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REA 617 –Week 6: Final Project: Content Area Literacy Thematic Unit:
“Newton’s Laws of Motion”
April Mitchell
REA 617-1AO75: Content Area Literacy
Belhaven University-Jackson, MS
November 21, 2020
Dr. M. Kenyon
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REA 617 –Week 6: Final Project: Content Area Literacy Thematic Unit: “Newton’s Laws
of Motion”
Table of Contents
Content Area Literacy Thematic Unit Planning Guide……………………………………3
Content Area Literacy Thematic Unit Plan…………………………………………..……9
Materials, Equipment, and Supplemental Resources………………………………….…12
Daily Lesson Plans……………………………………………………………………..…..13
Teacher Reflection……………………………………………………………………….30
References………………………………………………………………………………..32
Appendices
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REA 617 –Week 6: Final Project: Content Area Literacy Thematic Unit:
“Newton’s Laws of Motion”
Name: April Mitchell
Subject/Course: Science
Grade Level: 9th – 10th Grade
UNIT TITLE: Oh, The Places You will Go
CENTRAL or BIG IDEA: All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think
analytically and systematically, using real-world connections, about how past and present
interactions of Newton’s Laws of Motion explain how things move, in terms of
acceleration, position, velocity, and time.
What is the specific objective for this content area unit?
•
Students will describe, understand, and explain the movement of objects
by applying Newton’s three laws of motion.
What is the essential question for the unit (real-world connection)?
•
What is needed for an object to accelerate?
•
How does net force impact acceleration?
•
How does things move and how can their movements change?
•
How does mass, speed, and force effect how an object moves?
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REA 617 –Week 6: Final Project: Content Area Literacy Thematic Unit:
“Newton’s Laws of Motion”
Name: April Mitchell
Subject/Course: Science
Grade Level: 9th – 10th Grade
UNIT TITLE: Oh, The Places You Will Go
Content Area Standards of Emphasis for Instructional Task:
➢ Mississippi College and Career Readiness Standards for Science (2018)MSCCRS PHS.5: Newton’s Laws of Motion.
MSCCRS PHS.5: Students will analyze the scientific principles of motion, force, and
work.
❖ PHS.5.1: Research the scientific contributions of Newton and use models
to communicate Newton’s principles.
❖ PHS 5.2: Design and conduct an investigation to study the motion of an
object using properties such as displacement, time of motion, velocity, and
acceleration.
❖ PHS 5.3: Collect, organize, and interpret graphical data using correct
metric units to determine the average speed of an object.
❖ PHS 5.4: Use mathematical and computational analyses to show the
relationships among force, mass, and acceleration (i.e., Newton’s second
law).
Literacy Standards of Emphasis for Instructional Task:
➢ Mississippi College and Career Readiness Standards for English Language Arts (2016)Reading Literature and Informational Text:
❖ RI.9.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of
what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
❖ RI.9.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a
text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze
the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g.,
how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
❖ RST.9-10.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science
and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or
descriptions.
❖ RST.9-10.3: Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when
carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical
tasks, attending to special cases or expectations defined in the text.
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❖ RST.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other
domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific
or technical context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
❖ RST.9-10.5: Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in
a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction,
reaction force, energy).
❖ RST.9-10.6: Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation,
describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, defining the
question the author seeks to address.
❖ RST.9-10.7: Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in
words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate
information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation)
into words.
❖ RST.9-10.8: Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a
text support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a
scientific or technical problem.
❖ RST.9-10.9: Compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those
from other sources (including their own experiments), noting when the
findings support or contradict previous explanations or accounts.
Writing:
❖ WHST.9-10.1: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
❖ WHST. 9-10. 1. a: Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s)
from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that
establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims,
reasons, and evidence.
❖ WHST.9-10.1. b: Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying
data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and
limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate
form and in a manner, that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and
concerns.
❖ WHST.9-10.1. c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major
sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between
claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between
claim(s) and counterclaims.
Speaking and Listening:
❖ SL.10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners
on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and
expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
❖ SL.10.1a: Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched
material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to
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evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a
thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
❖ SL.10.1b: Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and
decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues,
presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual
roles as needed.
❖ SL.10.1c: Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions
that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas;
actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or
challenge ideas and conclusions.
❖ SL.10.1d: Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points
of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify, or justify
their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of
the evidence and reasoning presented.
❖ SL.10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse
media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the
credibility and accuracy of each source.
❖ SL.10.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical,
audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance
understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Language:
❖ L.10.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiplemeaning words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content,
choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
❖ L.10.4a: Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph,
or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the
meaning of a word or phrase.
❖ L.10.4b: Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate
different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical;
advocate, advocacy).
TEXT SET:
ANCHOR TEXT
Isaac Newton and the Laws of the Universe:
Physical Science
Weir, J. (2007). Isaac Newton and the laws of
the universe. Huntington Beach, CA:
Teacher Created Materials Pub.
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Rationale: The anchor text will be used to
model reading comprehension skills
and strategies by demonstrating that
an object does not accelerate unless
an unbalanced force act upon it.
Fictional selection:
A Crash Course in Forces and Motion: With Max Axiom, Super Scientist
Sohn, E., Erwin, S., & Barnett, C. (2016). A crash course in forces and motion: With Max
Axiom, super scientist.S.l.: CAPSTONE PR.
Rationale: The fictional text set will be used to reinforce literacy skills. This text set will, also,
demonstrate that motion is a measurable quantity that depends on the observer’s frame
of reference.
Non-fiction selection [science-based OR historical-based text required]:
Isaac the Alchemist: Secrets of Isaac Newton, reveal’d
Losure, M. (2017). Isaac the alchemist: Secrets of Isaac Newton, reveal’d. Somerville, MA:
Candlewick Press.
Rationale: The nonfictional text set will be used to reinforce background knowledge, content
area information, and literacy skills. This text set will, also, explain the movement of objects by
applying Newton’s three laws of motion.
Visual Literacy (Text through pictures):
Isaac Newton And the Laws of Motion
Gianopoulos, A., Miller, P. L., & Barnett, C. (2010). Isaac Newton and the laws of motion.
Oxford: Raintree.
Rationale: The visual literacy text set will be used to gather and interpret information presented
visually. This text set will, also, visually, demonstrate the movement of objects by applying
Newton’s three laws of motion.
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Media text (audio/visual):
Bill Nye the Science Guy: Motion
C. (2017, March 10). Bill Nye the Science Guy: Motion.

Rationale: The media text set will be used to gather and interpret information presented through
audio and visual media features by describing the object’s motion in terms of position, velocity,
acceleration, and time.
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REA 617 –Week 6: Final Project: Content Area Literacy Thematic Unit:
“Newton’s Laws of Motion”
Instructional Time: 4 periods
PHS.5-Newton’s Laws of Motion Conceptual Understanding: Kinematics, or contact forces,
describe the motion of objects using words, diagrams, numbers, graphs, and equations. The goal
of any study of kinematics is to develop scientific models to describe and explain the motion of
real-world objects. Newton’s laws of motion are an example of a tool that can aid in the
explanation of motion.
Learner Outcomes:
Content Area Outcomes:
❖ I can analyze the scientific principles of motion, force, and work.
❖ I can research the scientific contributions of Newton and use models to
communicate Newton’s principles.
❖ I can design and investigate to study the motion of an object using
properties such as displacement, time of motion, velocity, and
acceleration.
❖ I can collect, organize, and interpret graphical data using correct metric
units to determine the average speed of an object.
❖ I can use mathematical and computational analyses to show the
relationships among force, mass, and acceleration (i.e., Newton’s second
law).
Literacy Outcomes:
Reading Literature and Informational Text Outcomes:
❖ I can cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what
the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
❖ I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a
text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze
the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g.,
how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
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❖ I can cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and
technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or
descriptions.
❖ I can follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out
experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks,
attending to special cases or expectations defined in the text.
❖ I can determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domainspecific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or
technical context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
❖ I can analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text,
including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction
force, energy).
❖ I can analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation,
describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, defining the
question the author seeks to address.
❖ I can translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in
a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information
expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
❖ I can assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text
support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a scientific or
technical problem.
❖ I can compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those from
other sources (including their own experiments), noting when the findings
support or contradict previous explanations or accounts.
Writing Outcomes:
❖ I can write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
❖ I can introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear
relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
❖ I can develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and
evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both
claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a
manner, that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
❖ I can use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and
reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
Speaking and Listening Outcomes:
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❖ I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners
on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and
expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
❖ I can come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material
under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence
from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a
thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
❖ I can work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decisionmaking (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation
of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as
needed.
❖ I can propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that
relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively
incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge
ideas and conclusions.
❖ I can respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their
own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the
evidence and reasoning presented.
❖ I can integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media
or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility
and accuracy of each source.
❖ I can make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio,
visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance
understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Language Outcomes:
❖ I can determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning
words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content, choosing
flexibly from a range of strategies.
❖ I can use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or
text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning
of a word or phrase.
❖ I can identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate
different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical;
advocate, advocacy).
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Materials, Equipment, and Supplemental Resources:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Student workbook
Anchor Text: Isaac Newton and the Laws of the Universe: Physical Science
A Crash Course in Forces and Motion: With Max Axiom, Super Scientist
Isaac the Alchemist: Secrets of Isaac Newton, Reveal’d
Isaac Newton And The Laws of Motion
Bill Nye the Science Guy Video: Motion
Appendices A-H
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Multi-Genre Thematic (Content Area & Literacy) Unit Plan
Daily Lesson Plan:
Content Area Literacy Unit Plan
Text set item(s) used in the
lesson
Content area and ELA
standards met in this lesson
DAY 1
Resources and description of lesson activities
The Anchor Text ( Isaac Newton and the Laws of the Universe:
Physical Science)
Standard of Emphasis for Instructional Task: Mississippi
College and Career Readiness Standards for Science (2018)MSCCRS PHS.5: Newton’s Laws of Motion.
MSCCRS PHS.5: Analyze the scientific principles of motion,
force, and work.
❖ PHS.5.1: Research the scientific contributions
of Newton, and use models to communicate
Newton’s principles.
❖ PHS 5.2: Design and conduct an investigation
to study the motion of an object using
properties such as displacement, time of
motion, velocity, and acceleration.
❖ PHS 5.3: Collect, organize, and interpret
graphical data using correct metric units to
determine the average speed of an object.
❖ PHS 5.4: Use mathematical and computational
analyses to show the relationships among
force, mass, and acceleration (i.e., Newton’s
second law).
Mississippi College and Career Readiness Standards for English
Language Arts (2016)❖ RST.9-10.1: Cite specific textual evidence to
support analysis of science and technical texts,
attending to the
precise details of
explanations or descriptions.
❖ RST.9-10.3: Follow precisely a complex
multistep procedure when carrying out
experiments, taking measurements, or
performing technical tasks, attending to special
cases or expectations defined in the text.
❖ RST.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of
symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific
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words and phrases as they are used in a
specific scientific or technical context relevant
to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
❖ RST.9-10.5: Analyze the structure of the
relationships among concepts in a text,
including relationships among key terms (e.g.,
force, friction, reaction force, energy).
❖ RST.9-10.6: Analyze the author’s purpose in
providing an explanation, describing a
procedure, or discussing an experiment in a
text, defining the question the author seeks to
address.
❖ RST.9-10.7: Translate quantitative or technical
information expressed in words in a text into
visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate
information expressed visually or
mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into
words.
❖ RST.9-10.8: Assess the extent to which the
reasoning and evidence in a text support the
author’s claim or a recommendation for
solving a scientific or technical problem.
❖ RST.9-10.9: Compare and contrast findings
presented in a text to those from other sources
(including their own experiments), noting
when the findings support or contradict
previous explanations or accounts.
❖ RST.WHST. 9-10. 1.A: Introduce precise
claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from
alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships
among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons,
and evidence.
❖ RST.WHST.9-10.1. B: Develop claim(s) and
counterclaims fairly, supplying data and
evidence for each while pointing out the
strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and
counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form
and in a manner, that anticipates the audience’s
knowledge level and concerns.
❖ WHST.9-10.1. C: Use words, phrases, and
clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships
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between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons
and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
Instructional goals for this
lesson
Statements that describe
what students will know or
be able to do at the end of
the lesson, as a result of
instruction. They must be
specific and measurable.
Students will be able to:
❖ Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the
major sections of the text, create cohesion, and
clarify the relationships between claim(s) and
reasons, between reasons and evidence, and
between claim(s) and counterclaims.
❖ Analyze the scientific principles of motion,
force, and work.
❖ Translate quantitative or technical information
expressed in words in a text into visual form
(e.g., a table or chart) and translate information
expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in
an equation) into words.
1. Before-Reading Activities •
Teacher will introduce the lesson topic by activating their prior
knowledge about Newton’s Laws of Motion.
Students will be asked to think about images that comes to mind
when they think of the word “motion”, and they will make a list
of examples.
Students will begin this unit with defining the vocabulary words
given in this unit.
Working in groups of four, students will compare examples and
use peer to peer teaching to assess it. This will give the teacher
the chance to see what may need to be retaught.
Teacher will present a PowerPoint on Newton’s Three Laws of
Motion.
Teacher and student will read the introductory chapter on Motion,
students will locate the key concepts with the help of the teacher.
Teacher will then break down the key concepts in ways that the
students can and will remember by using real world examples.
After the reading of the chapter in the textbook, students will get
in pairs and outline a particular section of the chapter given by the
teacher.
Once the timer goes off in 15 minutes, students will all share their
summaries and outlines for the others to write down.
•
•
•
•
2. During-Reading
Activities:
•
•
Teacher Facilitation
3. During-Reading
Activities:
•
Student Engagement and
Response
•
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4. After-Reading Activities
•
•
Accommodations or
differentiation strategies for
this lesson, to meet the
needs of all learners
Students will take a 3-2-1 Exit Ticket as a formative
assessment. (Appendix A)
Teacher will end class by clearing up any misconceptions.
Accommodations: For Day 1, students will be reading the text.
Teacher will group students with reading comprehension
problems and read aloud the definition of our vocabulary word.
Teacher will, also, give them time to write it down and then
model to them how they can compare their definition to the
book’s definition.
Daily Lesson Plan Template
Content Area Literacy Unit Plan
Text set item(s) used in the
lesson
Content area and ELA
standards met in this lesson
DAY 2
Resources and description of lesson activities
Issac Newton and the Laws of motion (text through pictures)
Standard of Emphasis for Instructional Task: Mississippi
College and Career Readiness Standards for Science (2018)MSCCRS PHS.5: Newton’s Laws of Motion.
MSCCRS PHS.5: Analyze the scientific principles of motion,
force, and work.
❖ PHS.5.1: Research the scientific contributions
of Newton, and use models to communicate
Newton’s principles.
❖ PHS 5.2: Design and conduct an investigation
to study the motion of an object
using
properties such as displacement, time of
motion, velocity, and acceleration.
❖ PHS 5.3: Collect, organize, and interpret
graphical data using correct metric units
to
determine the average speed of an object.
❖ PHS 5.4: Use mathematical and computational
analyses to show the relationships among
force, mass, and acceleration (i.e., Newton’s
second law).
Mississippi College and Career Readiness Standards for English
Language Arts (2016)-
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❖ RST.9-10.1: Cite specific textual evidence to
support analysis of science and technical texts,
attending to the
precise details of
explanations or descriptions.
❖ RST.9-10.3: Follow precisely a complex
multistep procedure when carrying out
experiments, taking measurements, or
performing technical tasks, attending to special
cases or expectations defined in the text.
❖ RST.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of
symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific
words and phrases as they are used in a
specific scientific or technical context relevant
to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
❖ RST.9-10.5: Analyze the structure of the
relationships among concepts in a text,
including relationships among key terms (e.g.,
force, friction, reaction force, energy).
❖ RST.9-10.6: Analyze the author’s purpose in
providing an explanation, describing a
procedure, or discussing an experiment in a
text, defining the question the author seeks to
address.
❖ RST.9-10.7: Translate quantitative or technical
information expressed in words in a text into
visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate
information expressed visually or
mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into
words.
❖ RST.9-10.8: Assess the extent to which the
reasoning and evidence in a text support the
author’s claim or a recommendation for
solving a scientific or technical problem.
❖ RST.9-10.9: Compare and contrast findings
presented in a text to those from other sources
(including their own experiments), noting
when the findings support or contradict
previous explanations or accounts.
❖ RST.WHST. 9-10. 1.A: Introduce precise
claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from
alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships
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among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons,
and evidence.
❖ RST.WHST.9-10.1. B: Develop claim(s) and
counterclaims fairly, supplying data and
evidence for each while pointing out the
strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and
counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form
and in a manner, that anticipates the audience’s
knowledge level and concerns.
❖ WHST.9-10.1. C: Use words, phrases, and
clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships
between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons
and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
Instructional goals for this
lesson
Statements that describe
what students will know or
be able to do at the end of
the lesson, as a result of
instruction. They must be
specific and measurable.
1. Before-Reading Activities
Students will be able to:
❖ Analyze the structure of the relationships
among concepts in a text, including
relationships among key terms (e.g., force,
friction, reaction force, energy).
❖ Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the
major sections of the text, create cohesion,
and clarify the relationships between
claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and
evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
•
•
•
•
•
•
The students will be given the opportunity to connect today’s
objectives by recalling yesterday’s activities and main points.
This will give the teacher the chance to see what may need to
be retaught.
A short PowerPoint will be shown on Newton’s Three Laws
of Motion.
Teacher will pair students in collaborative groups.
Activity 1: Catapult Basketball: Students will create their
own mini-basketball court with their groups, they will
construct a backboard with paper and tape. (Appendix B)
Teacher will provide catapults made from clothespins
mounted on a piece of cardboard with a two-liter soda bottle
top glued on top.
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•
2. During-Reading
Activities:
•
Teacher Facilitation
•
3. During-Reading
Activities:
Student Engagement and
Response
4. After-Reading Activities
Both the teacher and the students will popcorn read parts
from the anchor text.
There will be brief discussions to make connections with
what the author is saying and actual event and/or situations
from real life situations.
Activity 1: Students will diagram the game played and
answer questions provided by the teacher. Students will play
with a marble or a ball of rolled up paper to see how mass
changes the game.
•
The students will complete the RSQC2 activity as
formative assessment. (Appendix C)
• After the allotted time, volunteers will be given the chance to
share their thoughts.
• Students will work in groups to begin brainstorming about
upcoming project that uses a diagram to describe how force
and mass changed the game. This project will be due by the
end of the unit.
Accommodations or
Accommodations: Students with reading difficulties will be
differentiation strategies for paired to a student who does not have difficulties in reading.
this lesson, to meet the
Their peer will be able to help them research, comprehend what
needs of all learners
is read, and they can share and discuss different information.
Daily Lesson Plan Template
Content Area Literacy Unit Plan
Text set item(s) used in the
lesson
Content area and ELA
standards met in this lesson
DAY 3
Resources and description of lesson activities
A Crash Course in Forces and Motion: With Max Axiom, Super
Scientist
Standard of Emphasis for Instructional Task: Mississippi
College and Career Readiness Standards for Science (2018)MSCCRS PHS.5: Newton’s Laws of Motion.
MSCCRS PHS.5: Analyze the scientific principles of motion,
force, and work.
❖ PHS.5.1: Research the scientific contributions
of Newton, and use models to communicate
Newton’s principles.
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❖ PHS 5.2: Design and conduct an investigation
to study the motion of an object
using
properties such as displacement, time of
motion, velocity, and acceleration.
❖ PHS 5.3: Collect, organize, and interpret
graphical data using correct metric units
to
determine the average speed of an object.
❖ PHS 5.4: Use mathematical and computational
analyses to show the relationships among
force, mass, and acceleration (i.e., Newton’s
second law).
Mississippi College and Career Readiness Standards for English
Language Arts (2016)❖ RST.9-10.1: Cite specific textual evidence to
support analysis of science and technical texts,
attending to the
precise details of
explanations or descriptions.
❖ RST.9-10.3: Follow precisely a complex
multistep procedure when carrying out
experiments, taking measurements, or
performing technical tasks, attending to special
cases or expectations defined in the text.
❖ RST.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of
symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific
words and phrases as they are used in a
specific scientific or technical context relevant
to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
❖ RST.9-10.5: Analyze the structure of the
relationships among concepts in a text,
including relationships among key terms (e.g.,
force, friction, reaction force, energy).
❖ RST.9-10.6: Analyze the author’s purpose in
providing an explanation, describing a
procedure, or discussing an experiment in a
text, defining the question the author seeks to
address.
❖ RST.9-10.7: Translate quantitative or technical
information expressed in words in a text into
visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate
information expressed visually or
mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into
words.
FINAL PROJECT
21
❖ RST.9-10.8: Assess the extent to which the
reasoning and evidence in a text support the
author’s claim or a recommendation for
solving a scientific or technical problem.
❖ RST.9-10.9: Compare and contrast findings
presented in a text to those from other sources
(including their own experiments), noting
when the findings support or contradict
previous explanations or accounts.
❖ RST.WHST. 9-10. 1.A: Introduce precise
claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from
alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships
among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons,
and evidence.
❖ RST.WHST.9-10.1. B: Develop claim(s) and
counterclaims fairly, supplying data and
evidence for each while pointing out the
strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and
counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form
and in a manner, that anticipates the audience’s
knowledge level and concerns.
❖ WHST.9-10.1. C: Use words, phrases, and
clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships
between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons
and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
Instructional goals for this
lesson
Statements that describe
what students will know or
be able to do at the end of
the lesson, as a result of
instruction. They must be
specific and measurable.
Students will be able to:
❖ Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other
domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a
specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9-10
texts and topics.
❖ Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of
the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between
claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and
between claim(s) and counterclaims.
❖ Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in
words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and
translate information expressed visually or mathematically
(e.g., in an equation) into words.
FINAL PROJECT
22
•
1. Before-Reading Activities
•
•
2. During-Reading
Activities:
As we continue reading text, students will locate the key
concepts with the help of the teacher.
Teacher will break down the key concepts in ways that the
students can and will remember by using real world
examples.
Teacher will facilitate students as they Popcorn read the text.
Teacher Facilitation
3. During-Reading
Activities:
•
Activity 2: Vocabulary in Context: Vocabulary Knowledge
Scale. Students will complete the Vocabulary in Context
Student Engagement and
activity using the vocabulary words provided. (Appendix D)
Response
• Students will take notes by underlining or using sticky notes
to prepare them for their discussion.
• They can also write on their quadrant while reading and
working, but they are only to work on the quadrant they were
assigned in their group.
• Activity 3: K.L.M.: After that activity is complete, they will
use the K.L.M. Strategy activity. (Appendix E)
4. After-Reading Activities
• Students will then come to a stopping point and discuss the
main ideas of the reading.
• Teacher will reexamine students understanding of text for
Any unclear parts, Confusing information, Connections to
prior knowledge.
• Teacher will all answer questions that were posed and discuss
the confusing parts.
Accommodations or
Accommodation: For Day 3, students will be popcorn reading in
differentiation strategies for the beginning of class. Teacher will make sure that students do
this lesson, to meet the
not call upon ones with reading difficulties. Students will also be
needs of all learners
working in groups and reading an article. For the students with
reading comprehension difficulties, teacher will allow those
students to listen to the article on the computer. This will allow
them to stop it when they want to or rewind if they need to. They
will also receive every time to complete their quadrants.
Content Area Literacy Unit Plan
DAY 4
Resources and description of lesson activities
FINAL PROJECT
23
Text set item(s) used in the
lesson
Content area and ELA
standards met in this lesson
Bill Nye the Science Guy Video: Motion
Isaac the Alchemist: Secrets of Isaac Newton, Reveal’d
Standard of Emphasis for Instructional Task: Mississippi
College and Career Readiness Standards for Science (2018)MSCCRS PHS.5: Newton’s Laws of Motion.
MSCCRS PHS.5: Analyze the scientific principles of motion,
force, and work.
❖ PHS.5.1: Research the scientific contributions
of Newton, and use models to communicate
Newton’s principles.
❖ PHS 5.2: Design and conduct an investigation
to study the motion of an object
using
properties such as displacement, time of
motion, velocity, and acceleration.
❖ PHS 5.3: Collect, organize, and interpret
graphical data using correct metric units
to
determine the average speed of an object.
❖ PHS 5.4: Use mathematical and computational
analyses to show the relationships among
force, mass, and acceleration (i.e., Newton’s
second law).
Mississippi College and Career Readiness Standards for English
Language Arts (2016)❖ RST.9-10.1: Cite specific textual evidence to
support analysis of science and technical texts,
attending to the precise details of explanations
or descriptions.
❖ RST.9-10.3: Follow precisely a complex
multistep procedure when carrying out
experiments, taking measurements, or
performing technical tasks, attending to special
cases or expectations defined in the text.
❖ RST.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of
symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific
words and phrases as they are used in a
specific scientific or technical context relevant
to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
❖ RST.9-10.5: Analyze the structure of the
relationships among concepts in a text,
including relationships among key terms (e.g.,
force, friction, reaction force, energy).
FINAL PROJECT
24
❖ RST.9-10.6: Analyze the author’s purpose in
providing an explanation, describing a
procedure, or discussing an experiment in a
text, defining the question the author seeks to
address.
❖ RST.9-10.7: Translate quantitative or technical
information expressed in words in a text into
visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate
information expressed visually or
mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into
words.
❖ RST.9-10.8: Assess the extent to which the
reasoning and evidence in a text support the
author’s claim or a recommendation for
solving a scientific or technical problem.
❖ RST.9-10.9: Compare and contrast findings
presented in a text to those from other sources
(including their own experiments), noting
when the findings support or contradict
previous explanations or accounts.
❖ RST.WHST. 9-10. 1.A: Introduce precise
claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from
alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships
among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons,
and evidence.
❖ RST.WHST.9-10.1. B: Develop claim(s) and
counterclaims fairly, supplying data and
evidence for each while pointing out the
strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and
counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form
and in a manner, that anticipates the audience’s
knowledge level and concerns.
❖ WHST.9-10.1. C: Use words, phrases, and
clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships
between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons
and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
FINAL PROJECT
25
Instructional goals for this
lesson
Statements that describe
what students will know or
be able to do at the end of
the lesson, as a result of
instruction. They must be
specific and measurable.
1. Before-Reading Activities
Student will be able to:
❖ Design and conduct an investigation to
study the motion of an object using
properties such as displacement, time of
motion, velocity, and acceleration.
❖ Translate quantitative or technical
information expressed in words in a text
into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and
translate information expressed visually or
mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into
words.
❖ Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the
major sections of the text, create cohesion,
and clarify the relationships between
claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and
evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2. During-Reading
Activities:
•
•
Teacher Facilitation
•
The students will begin the class with answering the question,
“What is motion?”
Each student will provide their own answer with an example.
Teacher will ask students what they think science has to do
with sports.
Teacher will begin recording their answers on an anchor
chart headed “Sports & Science” that can be displayed in the
room throughout the unit.
Activity 4: How Much Force? Teacher will divide class into
four teams. (Appendix F)
Teacher will set up goals at four different distances away
from a set of cones.
Teacher will rotate groups through each set of cones so that
they must explore with the amount of force needed to shoot
the ball into each goal.
Activity 4: In their Science notebooks, students will draw a
diagram of the field with the cones and goals. (Appendix F)
Beneath their diagrams, students will write which goal
required the most amount of force to reach and which
required the least amount of force to reach.
Teacher will introduce the world friction to students.
FINAL PROJECT
26
•
Teacher will have a large poster made up ready to display to
them while outside so that visual learners can see what
friction means.
• Teacher will ask students to explain what friction has to do
with soccer.
• Teacher will move the goals to a blackboard or sidewalk
surface and repeat the activity.
• Teacher will ask students how force required changes on the
different surfaces.
• The teacher will present a YouTube video entitled, Bill Nye
the Science Guy: Motion.
• The students will follow along with a fill in the blanks
worksheet. (Appendix G)
3. During-Reading
• Teacher will have students come to the board one at a time
Activities:
labeling what they did on the worksheet on the smart board.
• Teacher will then discuss about the end of the unit project
Student Engagement and
with students and hand out instructions for project.
Response
(Appendix H)
4. After-Reading Activities
• The students will complete a Journal Entry as a formative
assessment. (Appendix I)
• Student will write a “rule” that describes how force applied to
an object is related to the distance traveled.
Accommodations or
Accommodations: Students with reading difficulties will be
differentiation strategies for paired to a student who does not have difficulties in reading.
this lesson, to meet the
Their peer will be able to help them research, comprehend what
needs of all learners
is read, and they can share and discuss different information.
Content Area Literacy Unit Plan
Text set item(s) used in the
lesson
Content area and ELA
standards met in this lesson
DAY 5
Resources and description of lesson activities
The Anchor Text ( Isaac Newton and the Laws of the Universe:
Physical Science)/ Project Requirements
Standard of Emphasis for Instructional Task: Mississippi
College and Career Readiness Standards for Science (2018)MSCCRS PHS.5: Newton’s Laws of Motion.
MSCCRS PHS.5: Analyze the scientific principles of motion,
force, and work.
FINAL PROJECT
27
❖ PHS.5.1: Research the scientific contributions
of Newton, and use models to communicate
Newton’s principles.
❖ PHS 5.2: Design and conduct an investigation
to study the motion of an object
using
properties such as displacement, time of
motion, velocity, and acceleration.
❖ PHS 5.3: Collect, organize, and interpret
graphical data using correct metric units
to
determine the average speed of an object.
❖ PHS 5.4: Use mathematical and computational
analyses to show the relationships among
force, mass, and acceleration (i.e., Newton’s
second law).
Mississippi College and Career Readiness Standards for English
Language Arts (2016)❖ RST.9-10.1: Cite specific textual evidence to
support analysis of science and technical texts,
attending to the
precise details of
explanations or descriptions.
❖ RST.9-10.3: Follow precisely a complex
multistep procedure when carrying out
experiments, taking measurements, or
performing technical tasks, attending to special
cases or expectations defined in the text.
❖ RST.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of
symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific
words and phrases as they are used in a
specific scientific or technical context relevant
to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
❖ RST.9-10.5: Analyze the structure of the
relationships among concepts in a text,
including relationships among key terms (e.g.,
force, friction, reaction force, energy).
❖ RST.9-10.6: Analyze the author’s purpose in
providing an explanation, describing a
procedure, or discussing an experiment in a
text, defining the question the author seeks to
address.
❖ RST.9-10.7: Translate quantitative or technical
information expressed in words in a text into
visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate
information expressed visually or
FINAL PROJECT
28
mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into
words.
❖ RST.9-10.8: Assess the extent to which the
reasoning and evidence in a text support the
author’s claim or a recommendation for
solving a scientific or technical problem.
❖ RST.9-10.9: Compare and contrast findings
presented in a text to those from other sources
(including their own experiments), noting
when the findings support or contradict
previous explanations or accounts.
❖ RST.WHST. 9-10. 1.A: Introduce precise
claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from
alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships
among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons,
and evidence.
❖ RST.WHST.9-10.1. B: Develop claim(s) and
counterclaims fairly, supplying data and
evidence for each while pointing out the
strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and
counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form
and in a manner, that anticipates the audience’s
knowledge level and concerns.
❖ WHST.9-10.1. C: Use words, phrases, and
clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships
between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons
and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
Instructional goals for this
lesson
Statements that describe
what students will know or
be able to do at the end of
the lesson, as a result of
instruction. They must be
specific and measurable.
Students will be able to:
❖ Research the scientific contributions of
Newton, and use models to communicate
Newton’s principles.
❖ Translate quantitative or technical
information expressed in words in a text
into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and
translate information expressed visually or
mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into
words.
❖ Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly,
supplying data and evidence for each while
FINAL PROJECT
29
pointing out the strengths and limitations of
both claim(s) and counterclaims in a
discipline-appropriate form and in a
manner, that anticipates the audience’s
knowledge level and concerns.
1. Before-Reading Activities
•
•
•
2. During-Reading
Activities:
•
•
Teacher Facilitation
3. During-Reading
Activities:
•
•
•
Student Engagement and
Response
4. After-Reading Activities
Accommodations or
differentiation strategies for
this lesson, to meet the
needs of all learners
•
Students will prepare their final projects.
Teacher will touch basis on all of the objectives and essential
questions that were a part of this unit.
Students will be allowed to ask questions about anything they
have misconstrued.
The teacher will facilitate the students as they come to the
front of the class and present their projects.
Teacher will use randomization to call students up to present
their projects.
Teacher will discuss rubric and scoring criteria.
The students will use computers to find any additional
information to use for their project.
Once they are done finding their needed material, students
will bring their findings to the teacher for approval.
Teacher will complete rubric to grade student’s work.
(Appendix J)
• Teacher will use Newton’s Laws of Motion Project as the
summative assessment. (Appendix H)
• Students will turn in their final and finished products to the
teacher for grading.
Accommodations: Students who have problems reading
will not have to read all the information in their research,
poster, brochure, or PowerPoint. They can have five facts
on a notecard and read those allowed.
FINAL PROJECT
30
Teacher Reflection
Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Many reading comprehension strategies and different text genres are used in my unit to
teach complex texts. We used our anchor text, “ Isaac Newton and the Laws of the
Universe: Physical Science” to get a better understanding and clear information about the
laws of motion. While reading, students will be working in groups and taking notes for a
better understanding of what they read.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
In this unit, the students will write everyday whether it is alone or with a group. On day
one students will record vocabulary definition from anchor text. On Day two, students
will complete an activity. The students will be put into groups of four. As they read
designated text set, they will stop at certain points and jot down information. At the end
FINAL PROJECT
31
they will discuss amongst themselves what they wrote down; they will then switch. I,
also, incorporated writing into the unit plan by using one of my formative assessments as
a writing prompt. It is better to write notes first to collect information; then it can be
organized as they please.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
In my unit I incorporated a lot of flexible communication and collaboration. With some
of the readings, students are to read aloud and popcorn another student so they can read
aloud. Almost every day of the unit students are working in groups to discuss their work.
On day two, students will get into groups to complete activity. After every discussion we
will have a class discussion by having students share information. At the end of the unit,
students will have a project presentation. The students will be speaking and listening
everyday of this unit.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
Vocabulary is underlined all through this unit plan by utilizing games, for example,
textbook readings, activities, and many discussions. Language conventions, language use,
and vocabulary are presented on the first day of the unit. The very beginning, students are
introduced to the main vocabulary words of the unit. Students also receive visual
representations of the vocabulary words. Numerous students are visual learners, so the
educator felt it would be a good idea to incorporate pictures. Discussions of the words are
also included in this unit. Having group discussions will help the students understand
information that is unclear to them. A student will listen to their peer before they listen to
their teacher. Sometimes a peer can explain and break down the information on an
FINAL PROJECT
32
understandable level. The teacher also incorporated a games and activities for the
students. Almost all students love games, and games help students retain information. If
students are learning in a fun way, they will not forget what they learned.
References
C. (2017, March 10). Bill Nye the Science Guy: Motion.

Connell, G. (2015) Make guided reading manageable. Scholastic.
https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/genia-connell/make-guided-readingmanageable/
Gianopoulos, A., Miller, P. L., & Barnett, C. (2010). Isaac Newton and the laws of motion.
Oxford: Raintree.
Hiebert, E.H., Pearson, P.D., Taylor, B.M., Richardson, V., & Paris, S.G. (1998). Every child a
reader. Ann Arbor, MI: Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement
(CIERA).
Mississippi Department of Education. (2018) Mississippi College and Career Readiness
Standards for Science.
FINAL PROJECT
33
https://www.mdek12.org/sites/default/files/Page_Docs/final_2018_mississippi_ccr_scien
ce_standards_0.pdf
Mississippi Department of Education. (2016). Mississippi College and Career Readiness
Standards for English Language Arts.
https://www.mdek12.org/sites/default/files/Offices/Secondary%20Ed/ELA/2016- MS
CCRS-ELA.pdf
Texas Education Agency. (2002). Research-Based Content Area Reading Instruction.
https://buildingrti.utexas.org/sites/default/files/booklets/redbk4.pdf
Vacca, R. T., & Vacca, J. L. (1996). Content area reading (5th ed.). New York: HarperCollins
Publishers.
Weir, J. (2007). Isaac Newton and the laws of the universe. Huntington Beach, CA: Teacher
Created Materials Pub.
FINAL PROJECT
34
Appendix A:
3-2-1 Exit Ticket
Responses from the Students
3- Things
that you
learned
2- things
that were
interesting
1-Question
that you still
have
FINAL PROJECT
35
Appendix B:
Catapult Basketball
Activity 2: Catapult Basketball Length of Time: one 45-minute science block
Vocabulary: force, motion, speed
Materials: marbles, double sided tape
Engage & Explore: Students will create their own mini-basketball court with their
groups, they will construct a backboard with paper and tape. The teacher will provide
catapults made from clothespins mounted on a piece of cardboard with a two-liter soda
bottle top glued on top. Discuss the rules of table-top basketball. Player 1 will shoot their
“basketball” – a ping-pong ball – into the hoop from a spot of their choice. If they miss,
they will earn a letter (“F-O-R-C-E”) and it will be player 2’s turn to pick a starting point.
If player 1 makes their shot, player 2 must make their shot from the same place. Next it
will be player two’s turn to pick the starting point with the same rules. The first player to
spell out the word “FORCE” loses. Explain: In their science journals, students should
FINAL PROJECT
36
diagram the game played and answer the following questions. “What forces did you use
to play this game?” “How did the amount of force used change as the distance from the
goal changed?” “How do you think this would be different if you had an object with a
different mass?” Elaborate: Have students play with a marble or a ball of rolled up paper
to see how mass changes the game. Evaluate: Have students work in groups to create a
poster that uses diagrams to describe how force and mass changed the game.
Appendix C:
RSQC
Recall – recall and rank prior knowledge of the most interesting and important ideas so far during
this unit
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Summarize – make a summary of all things listed in to a small synopsis
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Question – one question that still needs to be answered
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Connect – make a connection between what we are reading and the objectives of the unit
FINAL PROJECT
37
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Appendix D:
Vocabulary Matching
Name___________________ Class______________ Date________
Match each definition with the correct term.
Definitions
_____ 1. combination of all the forces acting on an object
_____ 2. force that opposes the motion of any object
_____ 3. an object’s motion will not change unless an unbalanced force acts on it
_____ 4. factor that determines the inertia of an object
_____ 5. type of force needed to overcome inertia of an object
_____ 6. tendency of an object to resist a change in motion
FINAL PROJECT
38
Terms
a. inertia
b. unbalanced force
c. friction
d. law of inertia
e. mass
f. net force
Appendix E:
FINAL PROJECT
39
FINAL PROJECT
40
Appendix F:
Activity 1: How Much Force?
Length of Time: two 45-minute science blocks
Vocabulary: force, speed, friction
Materials: soccer balls, cones, soccer goals (or some alternative, such as hula hoops or cones)
Engage: Ask students what they think science has to do with sports. Begin recording their
answers on an anchor chart headed “Sports & Science” that can be displayed in the room
throughout the unit. Show students a short clip of a soccer game. Ask questions such as, “What
forces do you see?” or “What motion do you see?” Explore: Divide class into four teams. In a
field, set up goals at four different distances away from a set of cones. Rotate groups through
each set of cones so that they have to explore with the amount of force needed to shoot the ball
into each goal. Explain: In their notebooks, have students draw a diagram of the field with the
cones and goals. Beneath their diagrams, have students write which goal required the most
amount of force to reach and which required the least amount of force to reach. Elaborate:
Introduce the word friction to students. Have a large poster made up ready to display to them
while outside so that visual learners can see what friction means. Ask students to explain what
friction has to do with soccer. Move the goals to a blacktop or sidewalk surface and repeat the
activity. Ask students how force required changes on the different surfaces. Evaluate: Write a
“rule” that describes how force applied to an object is related to the distance traveled. (This can
be related back to Newton’s Laws of Motion during the Day 3 or Day 7 mini-lessons.)
FINAL PROJECT
41
Appendix G:
Bill Nye Critical Reading Worksheet
Name___________________ Class______________ Date__________
Read this passage from the text and answer the questions that follow.
Inertia is the tendency of an object to resist a change in its motion. If an object is already at rest,
inertia will keep it at rest. If the object is already moving, inertia will keep it moving. Think
about what happens when you are riding in a car that stops suddenly. Your body moves forward
on the seat. Why? The brakes stop the car but not your body, so your body keeps moving
forward because of inertia. That’s why it’s important to always wear a seat belt. The inertia of an
object depends on its mass. Objects with greater mass also have greater inertia. Think how hard
it would be to push a big cardboard box full of books. Then think how easy it would be to push
the box if it was empty. The full box is harder to move because it has greater mass and therefore
greater inertia.
Questions:
1. What is inertia?
2. Describe how inertia affects motion.
3. What is the relationship between mass and inertia?
FINAL PROJECT
42
Appendix H:
Newton’s Laws of Motion Project
Sir Isaac Newton lived during the 1600s. Like all scientists, he made observations about the
world around him. Some of his observations were about motion. His observations have been
supported by more data over time; and we now call these Newton’s Laws of Motion. His laws of
motion explain rest, constant motion, accelerated motion, and describe how balanced and
unbalanced forces act to cause these states of motion.
Newton’s three laws of motion:
❖ Newton’s first law of motion says that an object in motion will stay in motion and an object
at rest will stay at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force.
• An object will not change its motion unless a force acts on it.
• An object that is not moving remains at rest until something pushes or pulls it.
• An object that is moving remains moving until something pushes or pulls it.
• All objects resist having their motion changed.
• This tendency to resist a change in motion is called inertia.
• The more mass an object has, the greater its inertia.
❖ The second law of motion states that the force of an object is equal to its mass times its
acceleration.
• A change in motion occurs only if a net force is exerted on an object.
• A net force changes the velocity of the object, and causes it to accelerate.
• If an object is acted upon by a net force, the change in velocity will be in the
direction of the net force.
• The acceleration of an object depends on its mass.
• The more mass an object has or the more inertia it has, the harder it is to
accelerate.
• More mass means less acceleration if the force acting on the objects is the same.
❖ Newton’s third law of motion states that for every action there is an equal and opposite
reaction.
• When one object exerts a force on a second object, the second object exerts an
equal force in the opposite direction on the first object.
• The force exerted by the first object is the action force.
• The force exerted by the second object is the reaction force.
FINAL PROJECT
43
Appendix I:
Journal Entry
Journal Prompt: Who is Sir Isaac Newton and what is he most known for? List and define
Newton’s Three Laws of Motion. How could or would affect our lives if these laws were
nonexistent? Minimum of five sentences to explain your point of view.
FINAL PROJECT
44
Appendix J:
Rubric
Brochure
/
Poster/
PowerPo
int
Quality of
format
1st Law,
2nd Law
and 3rd
Law
(each law
graded
individual
ly)
Law Stated
10
Easy to read,
visually
pleasing,
powerful
images, logical
sequencing,
appropriate
for audience,
exhibits
originality, no
technical
problems
4
Law is stated
Accurately
7
Visually
organized, all
information is
presented in
professional
manner, fulfills
expectations
5
Missing some
information, a little
unorganized, little
creativity
2
Law is stated, but
inaccurate
2 Pictures
8
Both pictures
present and
appropriately
illustrate law
6
Both pictures
present, but 1 or
both may not
accurately
illustrate law
Paragraph
8
Complete
paragraph
with no
grammatical
errors or
spelling errors,
Accurately
describes how
both selected
pictures relate
to 1st Law
6
Complete
paragraph with no
grammatical errors
or spelling errors,
but accurately
describes how
only one selected
picture relate to
1st Law Or Only
minor spelling or
grammatical errors
0
Little to no
effort,
missing key
information
0
Law is not
stated
2
Only one picture
present, but it
appropriately
illustrates law
4
Minor
errors in
accuracy
Or Major
spelling
and
grammati
cal errors
2
Paragrap
h present,
but does
not
accuratel
y relate
pictures
to
Newton’s
law
0
Pictures not
present or
not
appropriatel
y
illustrating
law
0
Paragraph
not present
FINAL PROJECT
45
Appendix H:
Newton’s Law Project
Where can you find Newton’s three Laws? This project allows you to present your project in one
of three ways. Option A: Poster Option B: Brochure (any size paper at least 8½ x 11 inches,
folded into thirds) or Option 3: PowerPoint presentation (not to exceed 10 slides)
Procedure:
1. First, you will need to state each law as it is written in your notebook or other source.
2. Then find at least two pictures that illustrate each law. Pictures can be from magazines, real
photographs, and newspapers, and must be printed and cut out if from the internet. The pictures
from the internet must be photographs not diagrams or illustrations and cannot already be labeled
with forces.
3. Write a paragraph describing how the pictures you choose illustrates the law. The paragraphs
must be at least 5 sentences. Please make sure your references are school appropriate.

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