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Created Fall 2018
Prepared by: Ali Soleymani and Taral Patel; Adapted by Evelyn Glube
Formal Report (Part C) Instructions
Due Date: Week 12
Length: 3000 words (excludes References and Appendices)
OVERVIEW
Writing a formal report is the important, final step of completing a major project. The report needs to follow the Technology
Report Guideline of Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT, 2017). The
purpose of the Technology Report is to demonstrate the candidate’s technical problem solving abilities; specifically,
students must demonstrate their abilities to:
•
Identify and define a technical problem
•
Describe the problem accurately and in detail
•
Logically apply a technical methodology to attempt to solve the problem
•
Describe the results through the use of technology fundamentals, designs, data analysis and other appropriate
techniques
•
Draw conclusions about the results
•
Make recommendations, if applicable
The final report must demonstrate a level of engineering technology or applied science knowledge and application equal
to that required of an Engineering Technologist. The candidate must also demonstrate the ability to present information
and ideas in an integrated, cohesive document.
The Technology Report will be evaluated in three areas:
Created Fall 2018
Prepared by: Ali Soleymani and Taral Patel; Adapted by Evelyn Glube
A. Report Structure
B. Content Quality
C. Format
REPORT STRUCTURE
The Technology Report must communicate information in a standard, comprehensible way following acceptable structure,
style, and format. The following components should be included in the Technology Report:
1. Title Page
The title should be descriptive of the work completed, but also concise (typically less than 10 words). In some cases, the
technical report may include an appropriate title for the project. The title page should also include the date, the names of
the team members who contributed to the report (if applicable), the class/project section, student identification number
and the name of the Professor to whom the report is being submitted.
2. Declaration of Authorship
The candidate must clearly indicate which parts of the overall Technology Report he or she completed and which were
completed by other members of the group, the college and program name for which the report was completed and the
date of submission to the college. The Declaration of Sole Authorship, worded as follows:
I, ___________________________ confirm that this breakdown of authorship
represents my contribution to the work submitted for assessment and my
contribution is my own work and is expressed in my own words. Any uses made
within the Technology Report of the works of any other author, separate to the work
group, in any form (ideas, equations, figures, texts, tables, programs), are properly
Created Fall 2018
Prepared by: Ali Soleymani and Taral Patel; Adapted by Evelyn Glube
acknowledged at the point of use. A list of the references used is included.
All sources of information must be acknowledged in the Technology Report. Plagiarism is unethical and will result in a
grade of zero. Suspected cases of plagiarism will be addressed as described in the Centennial College Academic
Honesty and Plagiarism policy.
3. Abstract (or Executive Summary)
The abstract should provide a synopsis (approximately 75 to 100 words ) of what is contained in the report. This should
include a description of the project design (why and how), the data presented, and the main conclusions drawn from the
data. When you write a technical report or paper, the abstract is an invaluable tool to those who might subsequently be
interested in its contents (i.e. professors, instructors, managers, senior vice-presidents, colleagues, etc.). The abstract
allows someone to quickly assess whether or not it is critical to read your entire report, (i.e. is it important that they read
the report, and if so, should they read it immediately?).
4. Table of Contents
5. List of Illustrations
6. Introduction
The introduction should explain the importance and objectives of the design, and provide a rationale for the method used.
For a design project, explain (in introductory terms) the intended application and the engineering principles applied to the
design. For experiments, explain (in introductory terms) the physical or other principles that the experiment will illuminate
or demonstrate. Follow this with a simple description of the experiment chosen (or assigned in most cases). The
introduction should also place the design in context. You can provide this context by researching secondary sources on
related theories and/or engineering principles, and paraphrasing the information in your own words with citations. You can
provide further context by briefly describing any experimental methods that others have used to illuminate or test the
same physical principles.
7. Design Section (if applicable)
Some projects have a significant design component. For example, a design lab might ask you to design and build a circuit
to perform analog to digital conversion on an audio signal. For these types of design projects, a separate section can be
Created Fall 2018
Prepared by: Ali Soleymani and Taral Patel; Adapted by Evelyn Glube
used to outline the design methodology. This includes a description of the design constraints and the goals of the design.
What are the inputs you have to work with (input signals, equipment, resources, etc.)? What are the desired outputs
(output signals, tasks the design should perform, etc.)? Make sure to both describe and justify the chosen design.
8. Results/Data/Analysis
The results section is a record of key observations. Depending on the design, it may be appropriate to present results as
pictures, graphical data, tabular data, and/or written description. Each graph, figure, or table should be described in detail
and complete sentences. The data presented must be so that your purpose for including the data is clear. If a lot of raw
data is generated in a design (i.e., a table or graph that exceeds one page) it is better placed as an appendix.
9. Conclusion(s)
In the conclusion, concisely summarize what you learned as a result of conducting the design. This can include both
expected and unexpected observations and conclusions about the design method itself (e.g. “we concluded that the
chosen design method cannot provide a reliable estimate of the speed of sound in water, because….”). You can also use
this section to briefly describe suggestions for future work, including ideas for improving the design.
10. Recommendation(s)
In the recommendations, suggest a course of action to the reader. This may include revisions to a design, alternative
steps/process for an experiment, or additional areas for others to study.
11. References
List any literature sources (books, papers, articles, websites, etc.) that you used in researching your topic and writing the
report.
12. Appendices
Reserve appendices for anything that distracts from the straightforward reading of the report. Examples of appendices
include a long list of raw numerical data; long and involved theoretical calculations with numerous formulae; and
collections of images captured from scientific instruments. Each appendix should be referred to within the main body of
Created Fall 2018
Prepared by: Ali Soleymani and Taral Patel; Adapted by Evelyn Glube
the technical report. Often, the data from the appendix is summarized in some fashion in the results section. This might
involve some manipulation of the data, or it might simply be a case of choosing sample data from large collection of data
contained in an appendix.
REPORT FORMAT
The formal report must demonstrate appropriate format and effective style. The list below briefly describes the
expectations for format and style. Specific expectations are listed on the rubric.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The report should be typed, double-spaced using Arial, Univers, or a similar Sans Serif 12-point font
The lines should be justified left, with pages number and appropriate page breaks
Correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar must be used
Consistent voice, subject-verb agreement, and verb tenses must be used
Jargon should be avoided
Acronyms must be explained
References, citations and paraphrasing must be accurate, and follow APA conventions
TECHNOLOGY REPORT GUIDELINES
REVISED MARCH 2017
OACETT
404 – 10 Four Seasons Place
TORONTO ON M9B 6H7
Contents
1.
Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2
2.
Topic Selection …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
3.
Declaration of Authorship ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
4.
The Technology Report Preparation and Submission Process…………………………………………………………… 4
5.
The Technology Report Proposal ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
6.
The Technology Report ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6
7.
The Technology Report Structure and Mechanics …………………………………………………………………………… 6
8.
Technology Report Content Quality ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
9.
Sample Technology Report Titles………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8
10. Technology Report Evaluation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10
11. Ownership and Confidentiality of the Technology Report……………………………………………………………… 14
12. Sample Technology Reports ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15
13. Technology Report Writing Seminar …………………………………………………………………………………………… 15
14. Resources ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15
© Copyright Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT), 2017
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Technology Report Guidelines
1. Introduction
The Technology Report (TR) is a certification requirement by the Institute of Engineering
Technology of Ontario (IETO), the certification division of OACETT, to achieve the Certified
Engineering Technologist (C.E.T.) designation.
The purpose of the Technology Report is to demonstrate the candidate’s technical problemsolving abilities, specifically their abilities to:
•
Identify and define a technical problem.
•
Describe the problem accurately and in detail.
•
Logically apply a technical methodology to attempt to solve the problem.
•
Describe the results through the use of technology fundamentals, designs, data
analysis and other appropriate techniques.
•
Draw conclusions about the results.
•
Make recommendations if applicable. While recommendations are not required, they
are suggested as a way to demonstrate additional critical thinking about the problem
and solution.
The Technology Report must demonstrate a level of engineering technology or applied
science knowledge and application equal to that required of an Engineering Technologist.
Candidates who are missing technologist level academics must complete any outstanding
requirements first. The Technology Report does not need to have original concepts.
However, the candidate must demonstrate the application of current concepts to a unique
context or situation. The candidate must also demonstrate the ability to present information
and ideas in an integrated, cohesive document.
2. Topic Selection
The topic of the Technology Report should be within the discipline of engineering technology
or applied science of the candidate’s academic background and for which the candidate is
applying for certification. The candidate should not select a topic unless the candidate has
either sufficient interest to learn the area in detail or has sufficient experience in the area to
deal with it at more than an elementary level. The Technology Report should include in depth
discussion and supporting analysis based on the candidate’s academic background and
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experience gained in the workplace. The discussion and analysis should be beyond what is
available in college and university level textbooks.
A topic not within the candidate’s academic discipline, but in another engineering technology
or applied science discipline, may be considered if the candidate’s experience has migrated
into this new discipline. The topic must be at the same level expected from someone trained
in that discipline. If the topic is not within an engineering technology or applied science area,
or is not one in which C.E.T.s normally participate at a responsible level, it may be considered
if the candidate’s experience has migrated into this area. In this situation, the candidate must
demonstrate strong interest in the topic and must be able to discuss the topic in depth.
3. Declaration of Authorship
Sole Authorship
The Technology Report must be the candidate’s own work and a signed declaration
confirming that this is the case must be included as a separate page in the report. If the
candidate has a college report prepared as part of a group project, refer to Group Authorship
below.
A signed Declaration of Sole Authorship stating the Technology Report is the candidate’s
own work should be worded as follows:
I,
, confirm that this work submitted for assessment is my own
and is expressed in my own words. Any uses made within it of the works of any other author,
in any form (ideas, equations, figures, texts, tables, programs), are properly acknowledged
at the point of use. A list of the references used is included.
All sources of information must be acknowledged in the Technology Report. Plagiarism is
unethical. A candidate suspected of plagiarizing may be referred to the Complaints
Committee.
Group Authorship
A Technology Report prepared as a group activity will not normally be considered; however,
a recent, less than five years old, undergraduate final-year report, prepared as a requirement
of an engineering technology or applied science program of studies, will be considered if all
other requirements are met except actual work experience at the time the report was
prepared. In this case, at the proposal stage, the candidate must clearly indicate which parts
of the overall Technology Report he or she completed and which were completed by other
members of the group, the college and program name for which the report was completed
and the date of submission to the college. For parts that were jointly completed, a detailed,
percentage breakdown of each individual’s contribution is required. A Declaration of Group
Authorship with this breakdown must be included as a separate page in both the proposal
and the report instead of the Declaration of Sole Authorship, worded as follows:
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I,
, confirm that this breakdown of authorship represents my
contribution to the work submitted for assessment and my contribution is my own work and
is expressed in my own words. Any uses made within the Technology Report of the works of
any other author, separate to the work group, in any form (ideas, equations, figures, texts,
tables, programs), are properly acknowledged at the point of use. A list of the references
used is included.
All sources of information must be acknowledged in the Technology Report. Plagiarism is
unethical. A candidate suspected of plagiarizing may be referred to the Complaints
Committee.
4. The Technology Report Preparation and Submission Process
Two-Step Process
Successful completion of the Technology Report involves two separate steps, which must be
followed in order.
1. Candidates submit a Technology Report Proposal as a PDF attachment to OACETT
via e-mail to Audrey D’Souza at adsouza@oacett.org. This proposal must be
received and approved before the candidate proceeds to the second step.
Guidelines for the Technology Report Proposal are provided below. If the proposal is
for a college technology report completed as part of a group project, it must include
the required information and detailed breakdown described in Section 3: Group
Authorship.
2. Candidates complete their Technology Report and submit one hard copy to OACETT.
The hard copy should be spiral-bound with card stock front and back covers. It should
include a copy of the Technology Report Proposal (complete with the detailed
breakdown required if the report was completed as part of a college group project)
and proof of acceptance of the proposal. The Technology Report should be sent to:
Institute of Engineering Technology of Ontario
OACETT
10 Four Seasons Place
Suite 404
Toronto, ON M9B 6H7
Guidelines for the Technology Report are also provided below.
5. The Technology Report Proposal
The Technology Report Proposal informs the IETO Admissions Committee of the candidate’s
intent to submit a Technology Report. It gives the Committee an opportunity to determine
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whether the proposed topic, problem and methodology will potentially result in an acceptable
Technology Report. The candidate must receive approval on the Technology Report Proposal
before proceeding to the Technology Report.
The Technology Report Proposal should be approximately 500 words in length. The
Technology Report Proposal should contain:
1. A Title Page with the following information:
i.
Title: The title should be 10 words or less in length, but should be specific and
detailed. It should use standard terminology so that it is clear what the report is
about.
ii.
From: The candidate’s name, membership number and address.
iii.
Discipline: The discipline in which the candidate is seeking certification.
iv.
Date: The date of submission of the proposal.
2. An Introduction that includes a short background statement of what the proposal
covers and why this particular topic and problem are being tackled. The introduction
should be approximately 100 words long.
3. A Body that includes a statement of the problem which the Technology Report will
attempt to address, the methodology with which this will be done and a hypothesis.
i.
The problem statement should provide sufficient detail using specific
engineering technology or applied science concepts, techniques, or processes
to identify what is wrong. The problem statement should be an actual problem
not summary or overview. Proposals that are summaries of an industry or
situation that do not try to solve a problem will not be approved. The problem
statement should be approximately 50 words long.
ii.
The methodology describes the approach the candidate will use to solve the
problem. The methodology description should be about 300 words long.
iii.
The hypothesis that states what the candidate thinks the solution to the problem
is expected to be and why. The hypothesis should be strong and clear. It
should not contain any words of uncertainty such as “maybe”, “probably”, or
“might”. The hypothesis should be approximately 50 words long.
The TR Proposal will be evaluated using the following checklist.
1.
Does it appear that the report will be in an area which will be acceptable for
this candidate?
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2.
Is the report within the candidate’s discipline? If not, will it be acceptable
because of extenuating circumstances?
3.
Does the introduction provide a statement of what the proposal covers,
giving a short background explanation of why this particular report is being
prepared (other than to meet OACETT’s Technology Report requirement)?
4.
Does the body of the report outline the problem, content, and methodology?
5.
Does it include technology fundamentals, designs, experiments, processes,
improvements, solutions and/or data analysis?
6.
Is there an acceptable hypothesis statement that describes what the solution
to the problem is expected to be?
The results of the Technology Report Proposal evaluation will be communicated via e-mail
within four to six weeks of its submission.
6.
The Technology Report
Once the Technology Report Proposal has been approved, candidates can start work on the
actual Technology Report. The Technology Report must be submitted within one year of the
approval of the Technology Report Proposal.
The Technology Report will be evaluated in two areas: Report Structure and Mechanics, and
Technology Content Quality. Each area must be acceptable in order for a candidate to
achieve a final grade of “Satisfactory” on the Technology Report.
7. The Technology Report Structure and Mechanics
The Technology Report must communicate information in a standard, comprehensible way
following acceptable structure, style, formatting and language choices.
The following components should be included in the Technology Report:
1. Title Page including the Title, the candidate’s name, current OACETT designation (if
any), membership number and the date of submission.
2. Declaration of Authorship
3. Copy of the approved proposal and the approval email from OACETT
4. Abstract (or Executive Summary, not both) which is a brief summary (approximately
75 to 100 words) of the report’s introduction, problem statement, methodology,
hypothesis, results, conclusion(s), and if applicable, recommendation(s).
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5. Table of Contents
6. List of Illustrations
7. Introduction which answers the following questions:
a. What is the industry or organization or context?
b. What is included and/or omitted? What is the scope of the report and what
procedures are used?
c. Why was the work described in the Technology Report undertaken?
d. What is the problem?
8. Methodology which outlines the steps taken to solve the problem.
9. Results/Data/Analysis which includes diagrams, charts, tables and other visual
information as appropriate.
10. Conclusion(s) which interpret(s) the data found in the results section. Conclusions are
reasoned judgment and fact, not opinion. Conclusions consider all of the variables
and relate cause and effect. Conclusions analyze, evaluate, and make comparisons
and contrasts.
11. Recommendation(s) (if applicable) suggest a course of action and are provided when
there are additional areas for study, or if the reason for the Technology Report was to
determine the best action going forward.
12. Bibliography (Technical References)
13. Appendices can include detailed calculations, tables, drawings, specifications, and
technical literature.
In addition to a standard structure, each Technology Report should follow acceptable style
and language usage including:
1. The document should be typed, double-spaced using Arial, Univers, or a similar Sans
Serif 12-point font.
2. The lines should be justified left, with pages numbered and appropriate page breaks.
3. Correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar should be used.
4. Consistent voice, subject-verb agreement, and verb tenses should be used.
5. Jargon should be avoided if possible.
6. Acronyms should be explained.
7. References, footnotes, quotations, and paraphrasing should be used correctly.
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The body of the Technology Report, from the Introduction to the Recommendation(s), must
contain at least 3000 words not including the Abstract, Bibliography (References) and
Appendices.
8. Technology Report Content Quality
The Technology Report should be a logical, methodical investigation into an engineering
technology or applied science problem. Candidates should provide details of what was done
in the study including what materials, equipment and procedures were used and why they
were selected over other alternatives. If relevant, candidates should provide drawings,
photographs and diagrams to support their work visually. Calculations should also be
included if relevant. Additional calculations and references can be included in the Appendices
rather than the Body of the report.
When writing the report, candidates should assume their readers are from the same
engineering technology or applied science discipline but may not necessarily be from the
same specific area within that discipline.
Candidates should keep the following criteria in mind as they write their Technology Report:
•
The methodology should be scientifically sound and the engineering technology
principles should be appropriate to the subject area.
•
The data and results should be accurate and complete. They should follow sound
scientific and engineering technology principles. Results lead to meaningful
conclusions from the data whether it was determined from experiments, theories or
secondary sources.
•
The mathematical formulae should be applied appropriately.
• The illustrations/diagrams/charts should be technically correct.
•
The analysis should be complete.
• Candidates should summarize the results and illustrate the most significant ones.
• The Conclusion(s), and if applicable the Recommendation(s), should be logical and
relate to and reflect the Problem Statement.
9. Sample Technology Report Titles
A Technology Report should relate to the discipline in which the candidate wants certification.
It should describe an engineering technology or applied science problem and how it was
solved. The Technology Report title should clearly indicate what problem is being solved in
the report.
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Examples of technical problems that might be solved in a Technology Report include: design,
redesign or restoration; testing and analysis; selection, development or improvement of a
product, process or piece of equipment; improvement of efficiency or cost effectiveness;
meeting a specific set of standards; and investigation or assessment of a site.
The following are sample titles from actual Technology Reports in different disciplines:
Building/Architectural
•
Standardized Shear Testing of Structural Panels with Blocking
•
Investigation of Mold Amplification within an Institutional Building
•
Laboratory Assessment of Roller-Compacted Concrete
•
Restoration of Concrete Structures Damaged by Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel
•
Cost and Schedule Control for Daycare Renovations Where Asbestos Identified
Chemical
•
Effects of Filler Concentration and Shear Rate on Filled Polymer Compound Viscosity
•
Determining Heavy Water Properties in Nuclear Reactor Computer Blowdown Code
•
Analysis of Ethyl Carbonate in Wine
Electronics
•
Developing Three Position Elevator Model with Soft Start and Soft Stop
•
Designing Continuous Online Catalyst Loading
•
Audio Spectrum Analyzer Design
•
Implementing Subcarrier Multiplexing on Fiber Optic Networks
•
Evaluating Gas Monitoring Measurement Techniques
Civil
•
Traffic Calming: An Evaluation of Tools and Policies for Ontario
•
Lake Oxygen Restoration Project
•
Fuel Oil Tank Decommissioning and Impacted Soil Removal
•
The Design and Analysis of a Retaining Wall on an Irregular Slope
© Copyright Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT), 2017
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Environmental
•
An Environmental Health Assessment of Grenadier Pond
•
Laboratory Analysis Utilizing an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer
•
Quantifying Stormwater Pollutant Reduction Benefits of Public Works Maintenance
Practices
Mechanical
•
Design and Development of Coat Hook Assembly for Automotive Interior Application
•
How to Manufacture More Effectively Using Laser Technology
•
Improving Indoor Air Quality in a Residential Application
10. Technology Report Evaluation
Technology Reports are evaluated using three checklists: The Prescreening Checklist, the
Report Mechanics and Structure Checklist, and the Report Content Checklist. In order to
achieve a “Satisfactory” result on the Technology Report, candidates must achieve 100% on
the Prescreening Checklist, 60% on the Report Mechanics and Structure Checklist, and 60%
on the Report Content Checklist.
Prescreening Checklist
1.
Has a Proposal for a Technology Report been submitted and accepted and a copy
of the approved proposal included in the Technology Report?
2.
Has the Technology Report been submitted within one year since the proposal
was approved?
3.
Is the Technology Report consistent with the Proposal (as approved and with the
comments and suggestions made by the proposal reviewer)?
4.
Is the Technology Report typed, double-spaced and justified left?
5.
Has a 12 point Arial, Univers, or similar Sans Serif font been used?
6.
Is the body of the report a minimum of 3,000 words?
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7.
Are the components included and in the following order: Title Page; Declaration
of Authorship; Approved Proposal; Abstract/Executive Summary; Table of
Contents; Lists of Illustrations/Diagrams; Body of the TR; Conclusion(s), and if
applicable Recommendation(s); Bibliography/Technical References; and
Appendices?
8.
Is there a signed Declaration of Authorship?
9.
Is the report dated?
10.
Is the Technology Report current? (The Technology Report should be less than 5
years old.)
11.
Is there a Title Page?
12.
Is there a Table of Contents?
13.
Does the Table of Contents correctly reflect the Components: Headings,
Illustrations/Diagrams and Appendices?
14.
Are the pages numbered with appropriate page breaks?
15.
Is there an Abstract/Executive Summary and Introduction?
16.
Does the body of the report contain Section Headings?
17.
Are there Conclusion(s), and if applicable, Recommendation(s)?
18.
Is there a Bibliography with appropriately cited Technical References?
Report Mechanics and Structure Checklist
This section evaluates the structure, formatting and writing techniques used in the TR.
Fulfillment of this criteria leads to a TR that looks professional, is easy to read and is
representative of the formatting standards of the industry.
1.
Does the Title, in ten words or less, inform readers of the precise subject matter
contained in the TR?
A title should be concise and include key words for indexing.
2.
Does the Abstract or Executive Summary provide a brief overview of the report
in approximately 75 to 100 words?
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3.
Does the Abstract or Executive Summary summarize the Conclusion(s), and if
applicable, the Recommendation(s)?
4.
Does the Introduction state the reason the work was undertaken? What is the
industry, organization or context? What is the problem?
5.
Does the Introduction cover the scope of the report? What is included and /or
admitted, and what procedures are used?
6.
Do the headings and subheadings in the Body adequately and accurately
describe the section or subsection content?
7.
Does the Body include information regarding the methodology?
Does it indicate materials, equipment and procedures used and why they were
selected over alternatives? Is there sufficient detail so that that the
methodology can be duplicated by others?
8.
Does the Body include recent research findings?
9.
Does the Body include results/data from the study?
10.
Are illustrations, tables, diagrams and charts clearly drawn, labelled and
numbered?
11.
Is each Conclusion, and if applicable, each Recommendation, stated in a
separate paragraph and in a positive way?
Conclusions should not be qualified with “it seems”, “probably”, “it may be”, or
other words that dilute the strength of the conclusion.
12.
Are the References/Bibliography complete?
All materials referenced in the TR should be represented in the list of
References/Bibliography.
13.
Do the Appendices support the study?
Do the Appendices include substantiating data and calculations? Extraneous
material should not be included.
14.
Is the spelling correct?
Has either the Canadian or USA spelling system been used consistently
through the TR.
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15.
Is the language free of jargon?
Are acronyms properly introduced? Are abbreviations appropriate and correct?
Can someone without specific expertise in the field read and understand the
TR?
16.
Is the same voice (I, one, person, etc.) used consistently throughout the
Technology Report?
There should not be any switching from third person to first person or vice
versa.
17.
Do the grammar and punctuation follow normally accepted rules of use?
Use Ron Blicq’s text Technically Write or a similar grammar reference as a
guide.
18.
Are thoughts and illustrations/diagrams/charts that do not belong to the writer
properly identified and footnoted in the text?
Are quotations indicated correctly? Are the authors referenced in footnotes
and/or reference list? Do they include the author’s name, the title of the
article/book, the date of publication, and the publisher?
Report Content
This section evaluates the quality of the work completed when addressing the problem
statement/hypothesis. Fulfillment of these criteria leads to a TR that makes a contribution to
the field under study.
1.
Are the Problem Statement and Hypothesis significant to the current state of
the field/industry?
2.
Is the Methodology scientifically sound?
3.
Are the engineering technology and applied science principles used in the
Methodology and Analysis appropriate to the subject area?
4.
Are the Data and/or Results complete?
5.
Have the Mathematical formulae been applied appropriately?
6.
Are the Mathematical calculations done correctly and accurately?
7.
Are the Illustrations/Diagrams/Charts technically correct?
8.
Is the Analysis of the results correct?
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9.
Is the Analysis complete?
10.
Are the Conclusion(s), and if applicable the Recommendation(s), free of
discussion, explanation and opinion?
11.
Do the Conclusion(s), and if applicable the Recommendation(s), relate to and
resolve the Problem Statement and/or Hypothesis?
12.
Are the Conclusion(s), and if applicable the Recommendation(s), logical?
13.
Does the report make a contribution to the industry/field of study?
The results of the Technology Report evaluation will be communicated via e-mail within
approximately eight weeks of its submission.
If the candidate receives the required scores for each section, the Technology Report will
receive a grade of “Satisfactory”. If the candidate does not receive the required scores for
each section, the Technology Report will receive a grade of “Unsatisfactory”. All
unsatisfactory reports are automatically reviewed by an additional evaluator prior to the
candidate being informed of the results of the evaluation. If the grade is “Unsatisfactory”, the
Reviewers will provide comments to assist with rewriting the Technology Report. An
“Unsatisfactory” Technology Report may be resubmitted only once and only after appropriate
revisions have been made. This resubmission must be done within three (3) months of the
notification date of the results. If, after revisions, the Technology Report still does not meet
the OACETT standard, a new topic must be chosen and a new Proposal for a Technology
Report submitted.
11. Ownership and Confidentiality of the Technology Report
The Technology Report will remain the property of OACETT and may be used as samples to
assist other candidates in the preparation of their Technology Reports. Technology Reports
are safely disposed of after one year.
An OACETT member may wish to submit a Technology Report prepared on behalf of an
employer or a client which is proprietary to that employer or client. Special arrangements can
be made with the Registrar for confidential or proprietary Technology Reports, provided a
written request is made in advance. OACETT will issue a standard, signed, confidentiality
agreement for such requests. The Technology Report will not become the property of
OACETT and all copies will then be returned to the OACETT member upon completion of the
evaluation. Candidates must obtain their employer’s or client’s written permission prior to
submitting the Technology Report to OACETT.
© Copyright Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT), 2017
14
12. Sample Technology Reports
Sample Technology Reports are available on the OACETT
www.oacett.org/Membership/Technology-Report-and-Seminar/TR-Samples.
website
at
13. Technology Report Writing Seminar
OACETT offers a Technology Report Writing Seminar to assist candidates in preparing for
and completing their Technology Report. The seminar is offered on a continuous basis in an
online format and several times a year in a classroom-based format. For information on the
Technology Report Writing Seminar and how to register, please see the OACETT website at
www.oacett.org/Membership/Technology-Report-and-Seminar/TR-Seminar.
14. Resources
The following references may be useful in the preparation of a Technology Report:
Blicq, R. S. and Moretto, Lisa. (2011). Technically Write, Eighth Canadian Edition. Toronto:
Pearson Canada ISBN-13: 978-0132158855.
Rubens, P. (2000). Science and Technical Writing: A Manual of Style, 2nd Edition. New York:
Routledge ISBN-13: 978-0415925518
© Copyright Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT), 2017
15
To: Mahdi Zanganeh
From: Jaisil S. Patel, 301110173, English 250-008
Date: 02/23/21
Re: Proposal for evaluating the design of electronic shopping cart.
Summary
Having an interest in electronics engineering, I have chosen this topic, highlighting the design of
an electronic shopping cart which can be more advantageous for handicap and aged customers as
well as busier stores.
Background
The concepts related to electronics engineering and to evaluate for the formal report are as
follows:
• Design of electronic shopping cart.
• Applications of digital temperature sensor and control.
• Applications of cluster computing (Raspberry Pi).
The chosen topic is the Design of an electronic shopping cart. There are various purposes
behind choosing this topic which includes.
Easier and faster means of shopping for customers and also less work for the employees of the
store.
Facts
Proposed plan: The report will be based on different ideas of designing an e-cart that can match
the needs of effortless shopping for the customers and reduce their drudgery. The methods
gathered from other websites or company will be ensured that does not implement copyright
issues.
The subject lines that can be used for the formal report are as follows:
• E-cart: a different vision of quality shopping.
• Looking after the needs of customers for an easy shopping
• Saying no to labour shopping with the use of smart carts.
1. Feasibility:
The prime goal behind this design is to reduce the labour work for aged people by lifting the
products and waiting in a long queue for checking out. Also, it reduces the time of payment by
the technology of self-checkout provided inside the cart. Moreover, the wain will be turned into
an e- cart with different functions and various features whose aim will be to ease the shopping as
much as possible.
Outcome:
I believe that this is a proper topic for my formal report as it is of my interest and I can share my
views on it. As a result, I request your approval for this concept. You can feel free to contact me
at 437-243-9628 or just email me at jpate606@my.centennialcollege.ca. I will email you after a
week if I have not got any response from your side. Thank you.

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