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Crisis Intervention Research Project 1Content

70–53 points52–34 points33–16 points15–0 pointsThe student followed the scenario details and provided a clear, focused, and comprehensive crisis intervention plan to deal with the school shooting. The plan is very professional and addresses all of the following:

Assessment of the situation to determine the identity of the shooter

Stopping the violence before more people are hurt

Addressing the media professionally

Dealing with parents compassionatelyThe student followed most of the scenario details and provided a mostly clear, focused crisis intervention plan to deal with the school shooting, although some details may be missing. The plan is professional and addresses most of the following:

Assessment of the situation to determine the identity of the shooter

Stopping the violence before more people are hurt

Addressing the media professionally

Dealing with parents compassionatelyThe student followed some of the scenario details and provided a crisis intervention plan to deal with the school shooting, although it may not be clear, focused, or comprehensive. The plan lacks professionalism and addresses some of the following:

Assessment of the situation to determine the identity of the shooter

Stopping the violence before more people are hurt

Addressing the media professionally

Dealing with parents compassionatelyThe student didn’t follow the scenario details or provide a crisis intervention plan to deal with the school shooting. Any content present is unprofessional and doesn’t address the following:

Assessment of the situation to determine the identity of the shooter

Stopping the violence before more people are hurt

Addressing the media professionally

Penn Foster Inc. | 501304_01_CJS260_Crisis_Intervention_01_Project 1.mp4
Welcome to Crisis Intervention. CJS260. Project 1.
Most people believe that violence in school began with the Columbine shootings in 1991. But did you know that the very first
school shooting recorded in the United States was on March 15 in 1884 in Gainesville, Georgia. When a very drunk Jackson County
farmer shot several fires in a school. No one was hurt in that shooting.
In 1887 however, on June 12 in Cleveland, Tennessee, Will Guess went directly into a school and fatally shot the school teacher of
his little sister for whipping his sister the day before.
In 1889, in Washington, DC, a third grade teacher at Jefferson school was shot to death by her estranged husband– who then
committed suicide.
In 1889, Charles Crawford was upset over an argument with the school trustee, went up to the window and fired the pistol in the
crowded school room. The bullet lodged in the wall just above the teacher’s head.
All of these school shootings were done by people who knew the teachers. These were all done by adults. It’s not until we go into
1903 that a 17 year old in South Carolina– no, no that’s [INAUDIBLE] a teacher ruins himself.
So it’s really not until we get into the 1900s though, that students start shooting. In 1905 Pearl Cruse a 17-year-old non-student
attended a meeting and shot a teacher at the request of her friend. So it isn’t until the early 1900s that students start [INAUDIBLE]
Now however, we have a timeline, and all that information came from Wikipedia encyclopedia. If you look at a timeline of school
shootings in the United States between 1990 and 2014, you’ll see that including Columbine, 173 people were killed and 87 were
injured.
In 2013, they took a sample of youths grades nine through 12. 7.1% say that they don’t go to school on one or more days because
they feel unsafe. 5.2% say they carry some kind of weapon– whether it’s a gun, a knife, or club– because they either feel the need
to protect themselves, or they want to do violence to others. 6.9% of all those surveyed, report that they were threatened or
injured with a weapon while on school property one or more times during the twelve months. And 19.6% reported being bullied on
school property. That’s a heck of a lot of kids in this 2013 national survey.
Now why did I bring up all these? Because none of these statistics– even though the ones that show you how many people die,
how many people report carrying weapons, how many people are bullied– they don’t take into account the mental stress that the
victims and their family are going to face before the shootings, during the shootings, after the shootings. And that’s what we’re
going to talk about in this project.
Here’s the scenario for your project. Your day starts off like any other until you get the call you’ve always dreaded. There’s a report
that shots are being fired at your local middle school. The first news is that there is definitely fatalities, and panicked children are
calling their parents, who are now showing up at the school. Of course, the local media hounds are there too. So here’s your job.
You’re going to have to be the first responders to enter the school, deal with the kids, the parents, and the media.
Your task as the first responder is to develop a crisis intervention plan to determine the cause of the shooting, deal with the media,
and deal with the parents. But first and foremost, your first job is to stop the violence before more students get killed and injured.
So you’re going to create a plan. Now this is the plan that I found online for the Anne Arundel school district. I don’t want a plan
like this. You’re writing an essay. You’re writing paragraphs. But this is kind of the steps you’re going to take into account.
You are going to have to take into account what do you do in an emergency situation. Your first goal is to lock down that school to
enter that school and get the kids and the staff safe. Find that shooter, disarm that shooter or shooters. Cause you don’t know at
this point if it’s one student, you don’t know if it’s a teacher. You don’t know if it’s an adult from the outside world. You have no idea
who’s shooting who.
Get all the kiddos safe, all the staff safe. Find the shooter. Stop the shooter. Secure the building. Shelter in place. Have outside
things set up so that as you can get people out of the building, they have a safe place to go. You also have to have a secure place
for the parents who are now showing up at the school, a triage area for any of those who could be treated there before they go to
the local hospital, and a place for media to gather safely.
So your job is to lock down the school, secure the building, shelter in place, evacuate as you can, but keep all those kiddos there
so that you can possibly talk to them and find out what they know and most importantly council them. That’s your job. And you’re
going to do this– not in graph form like what I have here– but you’re going to do that in an essay format.
So what are your references? Your textbook of course, is a great reference. And your study guide, on pages 25 and 26, shows a
huge list of references. Plus you may of course, use different references on top of that. I have no issue if you go beyond the
references I gave you for this project.
So how do I format this? I already said you’re not writing a graph sheet like what I showed you in that example. That’s just for you
to get the idea. You’re going to write a formal essay. And a formal essay requires a formal cover sheet that has your name,
complete mailing address, your student number– that’s your student ID– the course title and number, and that this is project one,
and the project number.
The organization of this paper is kind of simple. Standard font is always Times New Roman, 12 point font, one inch margins,
double-spaced. Double-spaced means you go into the formatting of your computer, and you set the double spacing. It doesn’t
mean that you go in there and you manually hit enter. The only time you should ever be hitting enter on your computer is when
you come to the end of a paragraph.
The way your paper should be set up is you should have an introduction that says kind of the scenario in recap, a body that
contains three to four paragraphs, and a conclusion. You are going to need a works cited page in APA format, and you are going to
need in-text citations. How do I do in-text citations, you say– right here. An in-text citation should be introduced properly. You’re
already pretty far along in your courses. You’ve all had English Comp, so you have your little brown handbook, it is an absolute
gem. In the back there’s a whole section on APA formatting, so please don’t say that you don’t have any resources. Secondly,
many of you have already had English Comp 2 at this point in time. So again, you know how to do this. If you haven’t had English
Comp 2, there is other great resources we’re going to get into as well, in a few minutes.
This is a sample of some in-text citations. Now I have to tell you right off the bat, the reference list here does not go on the same
page. Absolutely doesn’t. I found this example and I love it, except for it gives you the idea that the reference list goes on the
same page. It doesn’t. But in APA formatting– and if you look at this, this is something that I just found as an example– it says,
popular in the essay are as, or according to Lou– that’s the author– the date of publication, just the year of publication as Lou
points out. Locally films have– and then start the quote, and we end the quote– notice there’s no punctuation. Everything that was
directly taken from the author is inside the quotes.
And then we have parentheses, page with a period, p period, with page that it came from. If its from an internet article, you would
use para for paragraph. And you would count down, say it was the eighth paragraph the fifteenth paragraph, whatever. Para 68, in
this case it [? resembled ?] a page number. If it was paragraph 15, you would say para period 15, close your parenthesis, then you
would use your end punctuation.
That’s a direct quotation. You used the original words of the author. This is a paraphrase. You’ve read what the author said. You
understand it but you’re expressing it in your own words. So you want us to know that even though you’re expressing it in your
own words, it’s still kind of close to what the author said. So you’re saying undergone a number of changes in style and content
over the past four years. Whenever you’re using numbers like this, a time frame, You have to give some kind of credit. That’s not
common knowledge. You’re using time frames, numbers. That’s a paraphrase summary that you have to say, I got this from
someplace. I’m just not making up these figures. So in this case you would use the author and the year of publication.
Now, in your reference list you’re giving the page numbers for it, so it doesn’t matter. But again, that’s on a separate page. I’m
really not happy with this example because it shouldn’t be on the same page. There are no footnotes. Absolutely no footnotes. I
know your Word Processor allows for footnotes. Footnotes are not used in MLA. And they’re definitely absolutely not used in APA.
So do not use that function. Absolutely do not use that function.
Here’s an example of some quotes. In the words of the textbook– and I see this all the time from students– our textbooks says. It’s
okay if you’re a very beginner student. But you are not beginner students. You are advanced students now. You’re in a Bachelor’s
degree program, so let’s do it right.
According to Feldman, that’s your author. 2010, that’s your date of publication, and then you end with p for page 170, end
punctuation. And again, notice there’s no end punctuation here in the first quote. There shouldn’t be.
Paraphrasing. This is the original quote. “The belief that emotions are determined jointly by a nonspecific kind of physiological
arousement and its interpretation based on environmental ques.” That’s the Schachter-Singer theory of emotion.
Okay, here’s the paraphrase. One theory known as the Schachter-Singer purposes that we feel emotions and become stimulated at
the same time as we receive environmental ques, sometimes based on past experience or on how those around us are behaving.
There’s not a lot you can change. It’s a definition. It really isn’t something that you can change. Actually, you could have probably
said, environmental influences, environmental something like that. This is where you click on it and you say thesaurus. You can
click on it. But it’s not one of those things you can really change cause it is still a definition. But you made some attempt.
If you use the exact words of a textbook and author, you are required to use quotation marks and provide proper citations, both in
the text, and in the properly formatted reference for website or page.
For additional information on the APA format, you do have the Penn Foster virtual library, you have your little brown handbook.
And another great source, it’s called the “Long Island University,” that’s what the L-I-U is for. The “Long Island University” APA. If
you can’t remember this very long link, you would type in google, Long Island University APA. Just type in. L-I-U space APA. [? And
you look at it right there. ?] And it’s a great source for students. But, again you have your little brown handbook. You have the
library. of Penn Foster. [? But the other great places ?] [INAUDIBLE].
This is an example of a good reference page. The only thing is, we don’t require that you use this header. But you should say
works cited or references. Notice everything’s in alphabetical order. You have the author’s last name, comma, the first initial of his
first– his or her first name– period. Parenthesis, date of publication, and this one happens to be a magazine, so we have the date
as well. Then we have the title of the magazine article, the article number, and then the page numbers.
Most of these are often magazines and things. And I’m trying to see if I can find a book. Here’s a book. This Greenfield. This is
actually two authors. 1990 is the year of publication, [? grammatical combination and ?] [INAUDIBLE]. Now this is because it’s a
foreign language, it has to be italicized. And these are the editors. So this one’s a great one cause it has editors. And then we have
this, the page numbers, and that’s the city of publication, and the publisher. And so you see all the different examples.
And it’s all double-spaced. Now, the way this is indented, this is called a hanging indent. And the could set up very easily. You do
the first line, and then when you hit the enter to get the second line, you go to the beginning of the second line and you do what’s
called a hanging indent for the paragraph. And once you set that up it’ll do that for all of them. So that’s what you need to do for a
hanging indent.
If at the time, you have any questions, my office hours are 9:00 AM to 4:30 Eastern time. And you can contact me at 888-4271000. Or you can send an email to me by clicking on Ask Your Instructor on your My Courses page of your Penn Foster website. So
you can either email or call me and I will be available.
Now, I have actually spent more time on this one than I think I should have, talking about how to set up the paper. My real concern
is that you understand how to do the body of the paper. So, if you have any concerns on how to do the body of the paper, please
give me a call.

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