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CSCI 1933 Project 3
List implementation: ArrayLists vs. LinkedLists
Due Date: July 18, 2022
Instructions
Please read and understand these expectations thoroughly. Failure to follow these instructions
could negatively impact your grade. Rules detailed in the course syllabus also apply but will not
necessarily be repeated here.
• Due: The project is due on Monday, July 18 by 11:59 PM.
• Identification: Place you and your partner’s x500 in a comment in all files you submit. For
example, //Written by shino012 and hoang159.
• Submission: Submit a zip archive on Canvas containing all your java files. You are allowed
to change or modify your submission, so submit early and often, and verify that all your .java
files are in the submission.
Failure to submit the correct files will result in a score of zero for all missing parts. Late
submissions and submissions in an abnormal format (such as .rar) will be penalized. Only
submissions made via Canvas are acceptable.
• Partners: You may work alone or with one partner. Failure to tell us who is your
partner is indistinguishable from cheating and you will both receive a zero. Ensure
all code shared with your partner is private.
• Code: You must use the EXACT class and method signatures we ask for. This
is because we use a program to evaluate your code (more on this later). Code that doesn’t
compile will receive a significant penalty. Code should be compatible with Java 11, which is
installed on the CSE Labs computers.
• README: You must include a README.txt in your submission that contains the following
information:
– Group member’s names and x500s
– Contributions of each partner (if applicable)
– How to compile and run your program
– Any assumptions
– Additional features that your project had (if applicable)
– Any known bugs or defects in the program
– Academic Integrity statement
There is a 10-point deduction if no README is included as one of your project
files.
• Questions: Questions related to the project can be discussed publicly on Discord in abstract.
This relates to programming in Java, understanding the writeup, and topics covered in lecture
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CSCI 1933 PROJECT 3
CODE STYLE
and labs. Do not post any code or solutions on any public channels. Do not e-mail
the TAs your questions when they can be asked on Discord. Individual questions can be
addressed on Discord via help tickets.
• Grading: Grading will be done by the TAs, so please address grading problems to them
privately.
IMPORTANT: You are only allowed to use import statements that are specified for
this project, plus common libraries such as Math, Scanner, etc. You are NOT permitted
to use Java’s built-in libraries for LinkedLists or ArrayLists. If you are unsure whether
an import statement will be allowed, ask a TA!
Code Style
Part of your grade will be decided based on the “code style” demonstrated by your programming.
In general, all projects will involve a style component. This should not be intimidating, but it is
fundamentally important. The following items represent “good” coding style:
• Use effective comments to document what important variables, functions, and sections of
the code are for. In general, the TA should be able to understand your logic through the
comments left in the code.
Try to leave comments as you program, rather than adding them all in at the end. Comments
should not feel like arbitrary busy work – they should be written assuming the reader is fluent
in Java, yet has no idea how your program works or why you chose certain solutions.
• Use effective and standard indentation.
• Use descriptive names for variables. Use standard Java style for your names: ClassName,
functionName, variableName for structures in your code, and ClassName.java for the file
names.
Try to avoid the following stylistic problems:
• Missing or highly redundant, useless comments. int a = 5; //Set a to be 5 is not helpful.
• Disorganized and messy files. Poor indentation of braces ({ and }).
• Incoherent variable names. Names such as m and numberOfIndicesToCount are not useful. The former is too short to be descriptive, while the latter is much too descriptive and
redundant.
• Slow functions. While some algorithms are more efficient than others, functions that are
aggressively inefficient could be penalized even if they are otherwise correct. In general,
functions ought to terminate in under 5 seconds for any reasonable input.
The programming exercises detailed in the following pages will both be evaluated for code style.
2
CSCI 1933 PROJECT 3
PROJECT STRUCTURE
This will not be strict – for example, one bad indent or one subjective variable name are hardly a
problem. However, if your code seems careless or confusing, or if no significant effort was made to
document the code, then points will be deducted.
Project Structure
Your project submission must adhere to the following rules. Failure to do so will impact your grade.
1. Your submission should be one ZIP file named
Project3.zip
2. The ZIP file should contain a single directory (folder) named
Project3
3. This directory should contain only these 4 files:
• ArrayList.java
• LinkedList.java
• README.txt
• analysis.txt or analysis.pdf
For example, the following would be a valid project structure:
• shino012 hoang159 Project3.zip
– shino012 hoang159 Project3
∗ ArrayList.java
∗ LinkedList.java
∗ README.txt
∗ analysis.txt or analysis.pdf
If you are working alone, just include your single x500 in the naming of the ZIP file and directory.
If you have any questions about this structure, ask a TA.
As always, make sure to include an academic honesty statement in your README. Failure to do
so will result in a 10 point deduction.
1
Introduction
IMPORTANT: This project utilizes interfaces and generics. For brevity, this write-up omits
discussions of such topics. For more information, please see a TA, review the lecture notes,
or review other related literature (e.g. official Java documentation).
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CSCI 1933 PROJECT 3
1. INTRODUCTION
In this project you will implement a list in two different ways: as an ArrayList and as a LinkedList.
You will then compare the time complexities of a select few List methods when implemented as an
ArrayList and as a LinkedList.
The List class contains descriptions of what each List methods should do. Following the instructions found in that interface file is just as important as following the instructions in this write-up.
1.1
LinkedList Implementation
The first part of this project will be to implement a linked list. Create a class LinkedList that
implements all the methods in List interface (found in List.java). Recall that to implement the
List interface and use the generic compatibility with your code, LinkedList should have following
structure:
public class LinkedList implements List {

}
The underlying structure of a linked list is a node. This means you will have an instance variable
that is the first node of the list. The provided Node.java contains a generic node class that you
should use for your linked list implementation.
You may implement your linked list as a headed list, i.e., the first node in the list is a ‘dummy’
node and the second node is the first element of the list, or a non-headed list, i.e., the first node
is the first element of the list. Depending on how you choose to implement your list, there will be
some small nuances.
Your LinkedList class should have a single constructor:
public LinkedList() {

}
that initializes the list to an empty list.
Implementation Details
• In addition to the methods described in the List interface, the LinkedList class should
contain a private class variable isSorted. This should be initialized to true in the constructor
(because it is sorted if it has no elements) and updated when the list is sorted, more elements
are added, the list is rotated, and more. For the purposes of this class, isSorted is only true
if the list is sorted in ascending order. More details about isSorted can be found in the
description of methods in the List interface.
• Initially and after a call to clear(), the size should be zero and your list should be empty.
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CSCI 1933 PROJECT 3
1. INTRODUCTION
• In sort(), do not use an array or ArrayList to sort the elements. You are required to
sort the values using only the linked list data structure. You can move nodes or swap values
but you cannot use an array to store values while sorting.
• Depending on your implementation, remember that after sorting, the former first node may
not be the current first node.
1.2
Array List Implementation
The second part of this project will be to implement an array list. Create a class ArrayList that
implements all the methods in List interface. Recall that to implement the List interface and use
the generic compatibility with your code, ArrayList should have following structure:
public class ArrayList implements List {

}
The underlying structure of an array list is (obviously) an array. This means you will have an
instance variable that is an array. Since our implementation is generic, the type of this array will
be T[]. Due to Java’s implementation of generics∗ , you CANNOT simply create a generic array
with:
T[] a = new T[size];
Rather, you have to create a Comparable (since T extends Comparable)† array and cast it to an
array of type T.
T[] a = (T[]) new Comparable[size];
Your ArrayList class should have a single constructor:
public ArrayList() {

}
that initializes the underlying array to a length of 2.
Implementation Details
• In addition to the methods described in the List interface, the ArrayList class should contain
a private class variable isSorted. This should be initialized to true in the constructor
(because it is sorted if it has no elements) and updated when the list is sorted, more elements
are added, the list is rotated, and more. For the purposes of this class, isSorted is only true
∗
†
specifically because of type erasure
had T not extended Comparable, you would say T[] a = (T[])new Object[size];
5
CSCI 1933 PROJECT 3
2. UNIT TESTS
if the list is sorted in ascending order. More details about isSorted can be found in the
description of methods in the List interface.
• When the underlying array becomes full, both add methods will automatically add more
space by creating a new array that is twice the length of the original array, copying over
everything from the original array to the new array, and finally setting the instance variable
to the new array. Hint: You may find it useful to write a separate private method that does
the growing and copying
• When calling the remove method, the underlying array should no longer have that spot. For
example, if the array was [“hi”, “bye”, “hello”, “okay”, …] and you called remove
with index 1, the array would be [“hi”, “hello”, “okay”, …]. Basically, the only null
elements of the array should be after all the data.
• Initially and after a call to clear(), the size method should return 0. The “size” refers to
the number of elements in the list , NOT the length of the array. After a call to clear(),
the underlying array should be reset to a length of 2 as in the constructor.
2
Unit Tests
As mentioned at the beginning of the project writeup we will be using a program to evaluate your
code. Specifically, we will be using JUnit (unit tests) to test each method that you implement. You
will be provided the same tests that will be used for grading so you can verify the accuracy of the
methods you write. Along with this project write-up, a document will be provided that discusses
how to run these JUnit tests (in IntelliJ).
Read the comments in the Junit test files carefully – when a test fails, you will see a line number
associated with an assertionError that caused that test to fail. Examine the comments associated
with the failed test, as they will indicate what specific case your method is failing, including edge
cases.
MAKE SURE TO TEST YOUR CODE USING THE GIVEN UNIT TESTS. A VERY
LARGE PORTION OF YOUR FINAL GRADE WILL DEPEND ON WHETHER
THE UNIT TESTS PASS OR FAIL.
NOTE: Unit tests files should NOT be included in submission
3
Analysis
Now that you have implemented and used both an array list and linked list, which one is better?
Which methods in List are more efficient for each implementation?
For a few of the methods (specified below) in List, compare the runtime (Big-O) for each method
and implementation. Ignore any increased efficiency caused by the flag isSorted. Include an
analysis.txt or analysis.pdf with your submission structured as follows:
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CSCI 1933 PROJECT 3
Method
boolean add(T element)
boolean rotate(int n)
..
.
4. GRADING RUBRIC
ArrayList Runtime
O(…)
O(…)
..
.
LinkedList Runtime
O(…)
O(…)
..
.
Explanation


..
.
Write an analysis of the complexity of these four methods:
• add(T element) method.
• rotate(int n) method.
• merge(ListotherList) method.
• reverse() method.
Your explanation for each method only needs to be a couple sentences briefly justifying your
runtimes.
NOTE: As stated in the List class, the initial calls to sort this list and other list for
the merge function should be ignored when determining the runtime of the method. Only
consider the merging portion of that function.
4
Grading Rubric
The following weight will be given to each category (NOTICE HOW MUCH OF YOUR
GRADE DEPENDS ON THE UNIT TESTS):
• Unit Tests: 80%
• Runtime Analysis: 16%
• Code Style: 4%
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