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Description

I’m working on a business case study and need support to help me understand better.

***MUST have access to the following textbook***

David, F. R., & David, F. R. (2017).

Strategic management: A competitive advantage approach, concepts and cases

(16th ed.). Pearson.

https://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/97801341679…

This is a 3-part assignment with 3 separate assignments that are a continuation project of one another.

Please follow instructions carefully and use the book listed above and attached study guides as resources.

Assignment #1: 2 page case study

Implementation Plan: Part 1

During
Unit IV, VI, and VIII, you will be working on an implementation plan
for a business. The components within these three units combined will
create this plan.

Please take a look at the 30 case studies
located in your textbook on pages 370–625. There are multiple
corporations that provide a large array of services and products. Please
select one of these 30 organizations that interests you. You will use
this company for the Unit VI and Unit VIII assignments, as well.

For
Part 1, describe the company that you selected, the products/services
they offer, and the history of the company. Next, analyze the company’s
strategy, mission, and organizational structure. In your analysis,
include the information below.

What does the strategy, mission, and organizational structure say about the company?

What are the positive aspects of the strategy, mission, and organizational structure?

What are the company’s short-term and long-term goals?

What are ways to improve the strategy, mission, and organizational structure?

You
will need to reference your textbook and at least one outside source
for this assignment. You are encouraged to utilize the CSU Online
Library, but you may also use external sources, as long as the source is
reliable.

Your project must be a minimum of two full pages in
length, not counting the title and reference pages. Include an
introduction paragraph.

Assignment #2: 3 page project

Implementation Plan: Part 2

In
Unit IV, you started to create an implementation plan. You selected a
company and analyzed their strategy and mission. In Unit VI, we will
continue your work with this company and develop a SWOT analysis.

Remember
that a SWOT analysis identifies strengths, weaknesses, opportunities,
and threats of an organization. This is an important analysis for any
organization as it can be used for strategic planning. Your SWOT
analysis must be a minimum of two pages in length. Once you have
completed your SWOT analysis, write a minimum of one page, explaining
how this information could be used by the company.

Please use the
template below to complete the SWOT analysis and explanation. Save the
template using your last name and student ID. For example, John Smith
whose student ID is 12345 would save his assignment as Smith12345. The
information you need to complete this analysis can be found in the case
studies located in your textbook on pages 370-625. You will need to
reference your textbook and at least one outside source for this
assignment. You are encouraged to utilize the CSU Online Library, but
you may also use external sources, as long as the source is reliable.

Click

here

to access the Unit VI Project Template.

(will attach in comments)

Assignment #3: 3 page project

Implementation Plan: Part 3

For
the final assignment of this course, you will continue your work with
the company you used in Unit IV and Unit VI. For the Unit VIII Project,
you will complete the final components of your implementation plan.

For Part 3, you will focus on the following points:

internal and external issues,

competition,

future outlook for the organization, and

implementation of tools for measuring business success.

Much
of the information you will need to complete this segment can be found
in the case study in the textbook. However, you will also need to
conduct some outside research. For the future of the organization, you
may be creative and add your own insight on where you see the company
going. You will need to reference your textbook and at least one outside
source for this assignment. You are encouraged to utilize the CSU
Online Library, but you may also use external sources, as long as the
source is reliable.

Your project must be a minimum of three full
pages in length, not counting the title and reference pages. Make
certain to include an introductory paragraph.

Attached are the class readings and assignment template

UNIT IV STUDY GUIDE
Strategy
Course Learning Outcomes for Unit IV
Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Analyze the nuances of strategic management.
2. Correlate the characteristics of vision and mission to business success.
5. Diagram the strategy analysis process.
5.1 Describe the strategy analysis process.
Reading Assignment
Chapter 5: Strategies in Action
Chapter 6: Strategy Analysis and Choice
Unit Lesson
Previously, we have discussed how to assess your internal and external factors. In this unit, we are going to
expand on that by discussing strategies.
Chapters 5 and 6 will really focus on past strategies that have been successful and effective. These will
include formulation and an introduction of the SWOT analysis. This unit will also begin laying the framework
for a successful strategic plan. The final project for this course will be initiated during this unit and will build
upon each section as we move forward in the term together.
Strategy Formulation
Every strategy also encompasses long-term and short-term objectives. We will begin with a discussion of
long-term objectives and how these impact the strategy. A long-term objective is defined as the results
expected from pursing specific strategies. These objectives generally take between two to five years to attain.
The objectives must be attainable and realistic for the organization to achieve. Common long-term objectives
include growth, profitability, earnings, and social responsibility. Each level within the organization can have
long-term objectives. This includes the levels of corporate (highest level), division (middle level), and function
(lowest level) within an organization. An example of a long-term oriented company could be your local taxi
company and its plans to remain competitive in the digital age. For example, Yellow Cab of Boston could
strive to have interactive apps that allow riders to request a ride, split fares, and even receive a digital receipt.
Financial Objectives
Financial objectives are similar to long-term objectives but are more specific to financial themes. Examples of
financial objectives include growth in revenues, profit margins, cash flow, and other financial considerations.
There is a delicate balance when considering financial objectives. An organization may create a short-term
objective that may be harmful or even detrimental to the organization in the long term. Let us use Kodak as an
example; their short-term objective led to their overall failure. Kodak has been around for several decades as
the lead photo developer. They produced an array of products to include the introduction of the digital
camera. What Kodak failed to do was to ensure they remained technologically savvy with their digital camera
production and trademarks. Ultimately, the digital camera (their own creation) put them out of business.
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
1
Because Kodak did not have the foresight to create a long-term (and financial)UNIT
objective,
they GUIDE
were not able
x STUDY
to remain relevant to consumers and ultimately failed.
Title
Strategic Model
There are many different models that can be incorporated into an organization’s strategy. Most organizations
incorporate one strategy to achieve their goals and expected outcomes. A few examples of different types of
strategies include: forward integration, market penetration, product development, and liquidation. Below are
examples of how these strategies could be applied:
ï‚·
ï‚·
ï‚·
ï‚·
ï‚·
Forward integration: Think of Apple Pay, which would enable the customer to be validated and pay for
physical merchandise from a brick and mortar retailer via his or her phone.
Market penetration: Coca Cola personalized cans and bottles with individual names and catch
phrases, which has increased the popularity of the brand and are an example of this strategy. This
personalization has increased Coca Cola’s bottom line and presence in the domestic and
international households.
Product development: Think of a drug manufacturer creating a vaccine to prevent Ebola. This product
would serve a specific purpose and, if successful, would benefit many.
Liquidation: An example would be Blockbuster Video selling all of their merchandise before closing all
of their stores. This is an opportunity to pay creditors and investors a portion of what is owed before
dissolving.
Bankruptcy: You may be asking yourself how bankruptcy is a strategy, but it is a potential strategy to
assist an organization restructure or dissolve itself. There are five varying types of bankruptcy in the
United States. The specific types are Chapter 7, Chapter 9, Chapter 11, Chapter 12, and Chapter 13.
The below chart outlines the different chapters of bankruptcy:
Bankruptcy Chapter
Chapter 7
Chapter 9
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Description
All of the organization’s assets are wiped out in
order to eliminate debt.
Municipalities or incorporated areas that file this
bankruptcy do not have to shut down vital
operations.
This type allows for reorganization and a
comeback. An example is an airline that
reorganized and comes back.
This provides special relief to family farmers.
Similar to Chapter 11, this provides relief to small
businesses.
The specific chapter a company may choose would depend on its size and goals. For example, Kodak would
not file for Chapter 12 bankruptcy as it applies to family farms. The company must also consider whether or
not they want to dissolve the business or try and start fresh. However, in looking to start fresh, the company
must determine how it will reorganize itself to avoid future issues.
Strategy Analysis
The SWOT matrix is a tool to assist managers and leaders identify strategies within and outside their
organization. The strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat (SWOT) model has four strategies used to
evaluate and compare the organization related to its strength and weaknesses. This analysis is often used to
compare and contrast an organization against other competing organizations. The analysis is also used to
evaluate its internal operations to determine where improvements can be made. The chart below outlines the
functions of a SWOT matrix:
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
2
Strategy
SO: Strength-opportunity
WO: Weakness-opportunities
ST: Strength-threats
WT: Weakness-threats
Description
Evaluation of the organization’s internal
strengths to identify external
opportunities
Improving internal weaknesses by taking
advantage of external opportunities
The reduction of external threats
Reducing internal weaknesses
UNIT x STUDY GUIDE
Title
The SWOT matrix and strategy go hand-in-hand.
Suggested Reading
The chapter presentations below will provide you with additional information on this unit’s concepts.
Click here to access the PowerPoint version of the Chapter 5 Presentation.
Click here to access the PDF version of the Chapter 5 Presentation.
Click here to access the PowerPoint version of the Chapter 6 Presentation.
Click here to access the PDF version of the Chapter 6 Presentation.
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
3
UNIT VI STUDY GUIDE
Evaluating Strategies
Course Learning Outcomes for Unit VI
Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:
7. Establish a strategic management follow-up process.
9. Assess the strategy evaluation process.
Reading Assignment
Chapter 9: Strategy Review, Evaluation, and Control
Unit Lesson
Chapter 9 describes how to effectively evaluate strategies and make timely changes as needed. In this
context, Chapter 9 explains how to develop a balanced scorecard and utilize contingency planning.
Every strategy must have the ability to be flexible and adaptable. Anytime an organization’s environment
changes, the existing strategy must be updated or replaced. In this unit, we will dive deeper into the strategy
evaluation phase. There are three main types of strategy evaluations, as described below:
1. understanding the foundation of the firm’s strategy,
2. analyzing and comparing expected and actual results, and
3. implementing actions to ensure the performance is consistent with the plan.
When you have an opportunity, please take a look at the case study on page 280 of the course textbook titled
Exemplary Company Showcase: Nike, Inc. (NKE). Personally reflect on how this organization has been
adaptable and successful for so many years.
Models
There are many different criterions and models for evaluating strategies. One example listed in your textbook
is Rumelt’s Criteria for Evaluating Strategies. This criteria is often used in the industry because it is proven
and vetted among many organizations. There are four main criterion that include consistency, consonance,
feasibility, and advantage (David & David, 2017). The chart below gives a brief description of each:
Rumelt’s
Criteria
Consistency
Description
Example
Organization must
present consistent goals
and policies.
Consonance
Organization must
evaluate strategies
according to societal
and/or individual trends.
Feasibility
Strategies must be
feasible and not over
burdensome
Have you noticed that CocaCola tastes the same in one
part of the U.S. as compared
to another part of the U.S.?
Look at the television trends
from the 1990s to present. In
an effort to remain relevant,
organizations must be able to
adapt.
Could you imagine if
Starbucks attempted to open
500 new stores in a onemonth period? This is not
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
1
Advantage
Strategies, in regard to 1)
resources, 2) skills, and
3) position, must be
assessed for competitive
advantage.
feasible and would create a UNIT x STUDY GUIDE
burden.
Title
The iPhone would be a great
example of having a
competitive advantage
among other phone
developers.
Measuring Organizational Performance
Measuring organizational performance can be accomplished by evaluating the expected results and
comparing that data to the actual results. Also, the long-term and short-term objectives are evaluated. If it is
noted that an organization did not achieve its expected outcomes related to goals and objectives, the
organization must implement corrective actions.
In an ideal situation, these corrective actions have already been developed; if not, the actions must be
developed and implemented. Time is critical in relation to corrective actions, and any corrections must be
implemented quickly. Both internal and external factors must be considered when developing any corrective
actions. Also, policies, trends, and other factors need to be considered in an effort to effectively resolve any
variable. An example is office supply stores in the United States. Organizations, such as Staples, Office Max,
and Office Depot, have noticed major trends in the industry and are making every attempt to remain relevant
and adaptable. They face great challenges as more and more office supplies become obsolete due to
technology, and the ability and ease of access of ordering supplies online becomes more and more available
versus having to shop in a physical store. It is often difficult for these organizations to make the online-only
switch because they would lose brand recognition, and they also face steep competition in the online
marketplace.
Effective Evaluation System
There are multiple requirements for a strategy to be successful. Strategies must be formed according to
economic factors, meaningfulness, and timeliness; strategies must also clearly articulate an overall image of
what is happening within the organization. It is also recommended that the strategy evaluation be simple and
to the point. When the evaluation becomes complex, it enhances confusion and frustration among the
participants. As stated earlier, it is imperative that the organization creates a contingency plan that identifies
alternative plans in the event that the strategy does not move forward in the direction that was expected.
Contingency plans include avoidance of profit losses, how to meet higher demand, and technology
advancements.
Reference
David, F. R., & David, F. R. (2017). Strategic management: A competitive advantage approach, concepts and
cases (16th ed.) [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from
https://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/9780134167947
Suggested Reading
The chapter presentations below will provide you with additional information on this unit’s concepts.
Click here to access the PowerPoint version of the Chapter 9 Presentation.
Click here to access the PDF version of the Chapter 9 Presentation.
In the Unit VI Paper Segment, you will be completing a SWOT analysis. The website below will give you
additional information on how to complete this task, including a helpful video and specific questions to answer
for each category of the SWOT analysis. Go to https://www.mindtools.com, click on the search icon, and
search “SWOT Analysis.”
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
2
UNIT IV STUDY GUIDE
Strategy
Course Learning Outcomes for Unit IV
Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Analyze the nuances of strategic management.
2. Correlate the characteristics of vision and mission to business success.
5. Diagram the strategy analysis process.
5.1 Describe the strategy analysis process.
Reading Assignment
Chapter 5: Strategies in Action
Chapter 6: Strategy Analysis and Choice
Unit Lesson
Previously, we have discussed how to assess your internal and external factors. In this unit, we are going to
expand on that by discussing strategies.
Chapters 5 and 6 will really focus on past strategies that have been successful and effective. These will
include formulation and an introduction of the SWOT analysis. This unit will also begin laying the framework
for a successful strategic plan. The final project for this course will be initiated during this unit and will build
upon each section as we move forward in the term together.
Strategy Formulation
Every strategy also encompasses long-term and short-term objectives. We will begin with a discussion of
long-term objectives and how these impact the strategy. A long-term objective is defined as the results
expected from pursing specific strategies. These objectives generally take between two to five years to attain.
The objectives must be attainable and realistic for the organization to achieve. Common long-term objectives
include growth, profitability, earnings, and social responsibility. Each level within the organization can have
long-term objectives. This includes the levels of corporate (highest level), division (middle level), and function
(lowest level) within an organization. An example of a long-term oriented company could be your local taxi
company and its plans to remain competitive in the digital age. For example, Yellow Cab of Boston could
strive to have interactive apps that allow riders to request a ride, split fares, and even receive a digital receipt.
Financial Objectives
Financial objectives are similar to long-term objectives but are more specific to financial themes. Examples of
financial objectives include growth in revenues, profit margins, cash flow, and other financial considerations.
There is a delicate balance when considering financial objectives. An organization may create a short-term
objective that may be harmful or even detrimental to the organization in the long term. Let us use Kodak as an
example; their short-term objective led to their overall failure. Kodak has been around for several decades as
the lead photo developer. They produced an array of products to include the introduction of the digital
camera. What Kodak failed to do was to ensure they remained technologically savvy with their digital camera
production and trademarks. Ultimately, the digital camera (their own creation) put them out of business.
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
1
Because Kodak did not have the foresight to create a long-term (and financial)UNIT
objective,
they GUIDE
were not able
x STUDY
to remain relevant to consumers and ultimately failed.
Title
Strategic Model
There are many different models that can be incorporated into an organization’s strategy. Most organizations
incorporate one strategy to achieve their goals and expected outcomes. A few examples of different types of
strategies include: forward integration, market penetration, product development, and liquidation. Below are
examples of how these strategies could be applied:
ï‚·
ï‚·
ï‚·
ï‚·
ï‚·
Forward integration: Think of Apple Pay, which would enable the customer to be validated and pay for
physical merchandise from a brick and mortar retailer via his or her phone.
Market penetration: Coca Cola personalized cans and bottles with individual names and catch
phrases, which has increased the popularity of the brand and are an example of this strategy. This
personalization has increased Coca Cola’s bottom line and presence in the domestic and
international households.
Product development: Think of a drug manufacturer creating a vaccine to prevent Ebola. This product
would serve a specific purpose and, if successful, would benefit many.
Liquidation: An example would be Blockbuster Video selling all of their merchandise before closing all
of their stores. This is an opportunity to pay creditors and investors a portion of what is owed before
dissolving.
Bankruptcy: You may be asking yourself how bankruptcy is a strategy, but it is a potential strategy to
assist an organization restructure or dissolve itself. There are five varying types of bankruptcy in the
United States. The specific types are Chapter 7, Chapter 9, Chapter 11, Chapter 12, and Chapter 13.
The below chart outlines the different chapters of bankruptcy:
Bankruptcy Chapter
Chapter 7
Chapter 9
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Description
All of the organization’s assets are wiped out in
order to eliminate debt.
Municipalities or incorporated areas that file this
bankruptcy do not have to shut down vital
operations.
This type allows for reorganization and a
comeback. An example is an airline that
reorganized and comes back.
This provides special relief to family farmers.
Similar to Chapter 11, this provides relief to small
businesses.
The specific chapter a company may choose would depend on its size and goals. For example, Kodak would
not file for Chapter 12 bankruptcy as it applies to family farms. The company must also consider whether or
not they want to dissolve the business or try and start fresh. However, in looking to start fresh, the company
must determine how it will reorganize itself to avoid future issues.
Strategy Analysis
The SWOT matrix is a tool to assist managers and leaders identify strategies within and outside their
organization. The strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat (SWOT) model has four strategies used to
evaluate and compare the organization related to its strength and weaknesses. This analysis is often used to
compare and contrast an organization against other competing organizations. The analysis is also used to
evaluate its internal operations to determine where improvements can be made. The chart below outlines the
functions of a SWOT matrix:
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
2
Strategy
SO: Strength-opportunity
WO: Weakness-opportunities
ST: Strength-threats
WT: Weakness-threats
Description
Evaluation of the organization’s internal
strengths to identify external
opportunities
Improving internal weaknesses by taking
advantage of external opportunities
The reduction of external threats
Reducing internal weaknesses
UNIT x STUDY GUIDE
Title
The SWOT matrix and strategy go hand-in-hand.
Suggested Reading
The chapter presentations below will provide you with additional information on this unit’s concepts.
Click here to access the PowerPoint version of the Chapter 5 Presentation.
Click here to access the PDF version of the Chapter 5 Presentation.
Click here to access the PowerPoint version of the Chapter 6 Presentation.
Click here to access the PDF version of the Chapter 6 Presentation.
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
3
UNIT VIII STUDY GUIDE
International Issues
Course Learning Outcomes for Unit VIII
Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:
8. Examine the process of implementing strategies across business operations.
Reading Assignment
Chapter 11: Global and International Issues
Unit Lesson
Overview
Welcome to our final unit for the course. During this unit, we will focus on the global impacts and issues
related to strategic management. As previously discussed, the overall health of the United States economy is
based on the global economy condition and outlook. Domino’s is a prime example of how a company can tap
into the global market to include areas that are still developing. If you do a quick Internet search, you will find
that Domino’s operates franchised pizza eateries in over 70 locations, grossing more sales internationally
than domestically in the United States. Previous to globalization of the markets, each nation or geographic
area had its distinct market areas and rarely interacted with other markets. This has drastically changed with
the increase of air travel, communication capabilities, and overall reliance of a global-based economy.
In 2005, Thomas L. Friedman released his book The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century.
In his book, Friedman tried to highlight the “flattening” of the world economy. His work attempts to help us
gain a greater understanding of the impact that the growing middle class is having on the worldwide economy;
Friedman discussed how the global supply/demand scenario we grew up with has changed, and he warned
about the struggles the western world will have to adjust to the changes (Friedman, 2005).
Made in Everywhere
Take a look around your house or apartment, and think about how many products are made in other countries
and shipped into the United States. Clothing is a great example of a product that is made all around the world.
Also, consider how many entities have developed, created, shipped, marketed, stored, and displayed the
product you purchased. Even though the product may have been made overseas, that product does create
and maintain jobs in the United States because of the distribution network. Take a look at the five largest
companies in each country. What would happen if these companies decided to only place their product or
service within their respective country? Would this cause severe economic losses and strategic challenges for
the companies? The consequences could be stagnant growth, overbearing competition from competing
entities, and a limited workforce.
Globalization
Many of the firms located around the world are not always considered as specific country based, but are
considered as international. Other corporations may be U.S.-based, or headquartered, entities but are
aggressively establishing themselves in the international marketplace. A recent example is Uber
Technologies based out of California, which is a company that provides a technological medium that connects
screened drivers with requesting riders. This service-based corporation has minimal overhead cost (services
only) and is rapidly expanding to other countries. Competitors, such as taxi services, describe Uber’s platform
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
1
as disruptive and not legitimate. Uber describes its service as an alternative customer
choice in
a market that
UNIT x STUDY
GUIDE
does not give its consumers the freedom to choose service with the ease and Title
reliability of a smartphone.
Corporate Taxes
Most counties have a set tax rate for doing business in their country. Existing and prospective corporations
consider these tax implications before setting up their entity in a country. The tax rates can vary throughout
the world. Rates range from 12% up to 35%. The United States has the highest corporate tax rate in the
world, currently set at 35%. This rate is considered very high for some corporations, thus limiting corporate
investment in the United States. Other entities see the United States as a must-have market for their portfolio
and are willing to pay the steep corporate tax rate.
Connecting the Dots
We have covered a great deal of content. Your previous coursework toward your degree has provided you
with skills and knowledge essential to future professional success. This class has asked you to begin to look
at your future and strategically implement what you have learned.
As you progress forward in your educational and professional endeavors, consider the strategy implications of
each choice and decision you make. For example, is it realistic to try to complete an undergraduate degree in
one year? A more realistic goal would allow four to five years to complete a program of this magnitude. Also,
consider incorporating some of the tools that we learned about during our time together. A great example is
the SWOT analysis and its practicality for major life choices. For example, if you are considering switching to
a new employer, consider the (S)trength, (W)eakness, (O)pportunities, and (T)hreats of transitioning.
In previous units, as well as in this unit, you have worked on an implementation plan for a company you
selected. Within this unit, you will gauge the outlook for your company and its prospects for the future. When
doing so, consider the previous investigation you have done for this course. If you were to combine the work
from the previous units along with what you will add from this unit, you will see the full implementation plan.
Consider how you would use plans such as this for your employer or your own business.
This is a great opportunity for you to demonstrate your understanding of the concepts of strategic
management and its application to organizations.
Reference
Friedman, T. L. (2005). The world is flat: A brief history of the twenty-first century. New York, NY: Farrar,
Straus, & Giroux.
Suggested Reading
The chapter presentation below will provide you with additional information on this unit’s concepts.
Click here to access the PowerPoint version of the Chapter 11 Presentation.
Click here to access the PDF version of the Chapter 11 Presentation.
BBA 4951, Business Policy and Strategy
2
Name: ____________________________________
Company Name: _____________________________
SWOT Analysis
Enablers
Challenges
WEAKENESS:
OPPORTUNITIES:
THREATS:
External
Internal
STRENGTHS:
How the above information will be used:

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