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Stage 3 Chart ROUGH draft
(I cannot emphasize rough more)
Petra Perrault
Day One
Day Two
Day Three
Day Four
Day Five
Introduction to Unit
(P) (OE)
Prior Knowledge (P)
(SA)
Brain Pop! (Q) (OE)
(IT)
Manifest Destiny
(Q) (U)
Manifest Destiny
continued (Q) (U)
Students will
complete a KWL chart
for me to get an idea
as to where students’
understandings lie.
We will have a class
discussion about
student’s knowledge
and create a class
KWL chart where we
will use it throughout
the unit to track what
we have learned and
cross out what we
want to learn (if
applicable). Attached
to the KWL will be
pages for students to
keep notes during the
unit. I will also
introduce the final
topic presentation to
students so they can
understand what we
are working towards
during this unit
I will be explicitly
teaching concepts
including, the
geographical United
States prior to the
Louisiana Purchase
and Thomas
Jefferson’s
presidency and why
he wanted to buy
the Louisiana
Purchase from
France. At the close
of this lesson,
students will look
back at their KWL
and fill in the
learned column or
confirm their
knowledge column
if understanding
was already there.
The exit slip will give
me an idea as to the
confidence level
students have
leaving the lesson.
Questions: Why did
Americans want to
move west? How
did this movement
change the United
States?
Questions: Why
did Americans
want to move
west?
Exit Slip link
Differentiation:
Students can access
the quiz on paper
instead of virtually.
KWL link
Differentiation:
Students may utilize
speech to text to
create their KWL
virtually.
Differentiation:
Students can have
extra time to
complete the exit
Students will log
into Brain Pop and
watch the
Westward
Expansion video on
their Chromebooks.
They will take notes
on the video and
complete a
worksheet about
then submit the ten
question short quiz
to me when they
finish.
BrainPOP video
Brain Pop quiz
BrainPOP
worksheet
Students will
understand the
impact Manifest
Destiny had on
the beginning of
the Expansion
through direct
instruction, note
taking, and small
group activities.
Manifest links
Questions: Why
did Americans
want to move
west?
Students will
continue to work
in groups to
discuss Manifest
Destiny. We will
add and cross out
items on our class
KWL and have
students share
their
understandings.
slip and use myself
or another adult as
a scribe if
necessary.
Students can also
choose two
questions of the
worksheet to
complete to help
minimize
overwhelming.
Day Six
Day Seven
Day Eight
Day Nine
Day 10
Change of Region (K)
(U) (OE)
Change of Region
continued (K) (U)
(OE)
Problems! (U) (S)
(IT)
Formative
Assessment/
Topic Choice (K)
(S) (U) (Q) (OE)
Research YOUR
topic (S) (IT)
The focus of this
lesson is for students
to describe physical
and geographical
changes that occur to
the US as a result of
the Westward
Expansion.
Students will use
maps to track the
Oregon Trail and label
the creation of states
including dates and
any other significant
changes that occur
individually
Map to fill in
Differentiation:
Students can receive
larger fonts on their
map to fill in.
Students will work
in small groups to
create a larger scale
map of the Oregon
Trail showcasing the
different travel
methods across the
map (covered
wagons, horse back,
etc.)
Differentiation:
Embedded in the
creation of groups.
Varied skill levels
will work together
and will be
monitored for
participation and
cooperation.
Students will
understand that
many challenges
occurred for
travelers including
illness, relationships
with Natives,
weather, etc.
Students will
receive direct
instruction
supported by group
article work online.
Students will record
their notes and
sources in their
note packet.
Problems links
Students will
answer questions
and respond to
questions about
what they have
learned so far.
Then they will be
expected to
choose which
topic they would
like to present.
Assessment
Differentiation:
Low readers will
be encouraged to
choose covered
wagons or Pony
Express as their
topic to access
Students will
utilize their
Chromebooks and
the library
database to go
through sources
and take notes on
their topic.
Topic links
level appropriate
readings.
G/T encouraged
to dive into the
Gold Rush.
Day Eleven
Day Twelve
Day Thirteen
Day Fourteen
Day Fifteen
Research YOUR topic
continued (S) (IT)
Presentation
Creation (S) (U) (K)
(IT) (Q) (T)
Presentation
Creation continued
(S) (U) (K) (IT) (Q)
(T)
Presenting our
topic (S) (K) (IT)
(SA) (T)
Summative
Assessment (T)
(S) (K) (Q) (U) (IT)
Students will utilize
their Chromebooks
and the library
database to go
through sources and
take notes on their
topic.
Students will be
creating their
presentation based
on their personal
notes as well as any
additional
information that
was presented
They will be
during class time.
encouraged to think
Students can utilize
pair share with
Google Slides, Flip
students of the same Grid, Screencastify
topic area and we will or other
continue to add to
appropriate
our class KWL
presentation
platforms to create
and possibly record
their report.
Differentiation:
Embedded into the
choice of
presentation
format.
Students will
continue creating
their presentation
based on their
personal notes as
well as any
additional
information that
was presented
during class time.
Students will have
the opportunity to
conference with
myself and peers to
ask questions and
receive feedback
before presenting.
Students will
either project or
directly present
their reports and
fill out an exit
ticket about how
they felt they did
and what they
would do
differently if they
were to do this
same project
again.
Students will
complete an
assessment either
written or
virtually,
depending upon
accommodations
where they
answer questions
and respond to
the necessary
questions and
understandings of
the unit.
Assessment link
Differentiation:
Students can take
assessment
virtually or on
paper for ease of
typing if
interested.
Students can use
the read to
feature if taken
virtually or use a
staff member as a
reader and scribe.
EDU 615 Learner Profile Data
For the final project, you will design and differentiate instruction in your thematic unit based on
information you provide and data you select to include from the district demographics and the learner
profile baseline data provided in this document. This combined information will constitute your class
overview.
You will provide your educational setting, your selected grade level, and state subject-matter standards
(these standards should be available online) to create your classroom overview. If you are not currently
teaching, select an educational setting, grade level, and subject area in your state.
The data provided in this document can be used to design a thematic unit for these educational
scenarios:
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Traditional: This includes public and nonpublic schools.
Virtual schools: Assume you are designing a thematic unit for a virtual classroom of 15 learners
and you were provided the learner profile data in this document.
Other educational institutions (e.g., the YMCA, First Start): Assume you provided the school
district permission from parents to obtain the data you create and the data provided in this
document.
Homeschooling: If you select this option, then you must design with this scenario in mind. Your
school district has tasked you with creating a thematic unit for homeschooling in your school
district. This unit will be shared with the instructors for the 15 students eligible for
homeschooling in your district.
When you select information from the district demographics to include in your classroom overview, you
must create a diverse classroom that reflects the diversity of district demographics. Your diverse
classroom should include students diverse in terms of demographics as well as academic
performance/special programs. Your classroom overview must include the following:
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A total of 15 students (this will give you a good class sample size to work with throughout your
unit)
Overall student demographics that closely reflect the district’s student population
2 English-language learner (ELL) students
1 English as a second language (ESL) student
1 gifted and talented (GT) student
2 students with an individualized education program (IEP) or a 504, or 1 student with an IEP and
1 student with a 504
50% of your class should be reading on or above grade level/50% should be below
When writing your class overview, you do have some creative freedom to write a classroom overview
based on your course grade level and subject matter, as long as the above minimums are included. You
may also consider the data points below when describing your classroom. For example, for your one of
your ESL students, you might include your observations from a parent interview that notes that both
parents have limited ability to read English. (This is information that you would “create” about this
student.) Note which of the data points to be considered you would review for all or some of your
students.
Data Points to Be Considered
 Individualized education programs (IEP)—learning disability, behavior plan
 504—students not labeled but have modifications
 Personal demographics—student home life
ï‚· Standardized testing results
ï‚· Formative and summative classroom assessments
ï‚· Gifted and talented (GT)
ï‚· English-language learners (ELL)
ï‚· English as a second language (ESL)
ï‚· Anecdotal notes
*These standards should be available online.
District Demographics
Enrollment:
Secondary
Elementary
Head Start*
Special Programs**
Kindergarten
Total
13,107—about 46% of the district
11,453—about 40% of the district
1,355—about 4.7% of the district
478—about 1.6% of the district
1,985—about 6.9% of the district
28,378
*Head Start is a pre-K program for low-income families.
**Special programs may include alternative schools, autistic programs, and other special education
programs such as pull-out special education and gifted and talented.
Student Population:
Anglo/Other
Hispanic
African American
23.2%
44.4%
32.4%
Economically disadvantaged: 78.8%—all schools are Title I schools
Learner Profile Baseline Data
State Standard Codes:
1. Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS)
a. Applicable for Grades Pre-k through 3
2. Reading (RDG)
a. Applicable for Grades 3–12
3. Mathematics (M)
a. Applicable for Grades 3–12
4. Writing (W)
a. Applicable for Grades 4–12
5. SS/H (Social Studies/History)
a. Applicable for Grades 8–12
6. Science (S)
a. Applicable for Grades 5–12
Yes – Met standard
No – Did not meet standard
Student
RDG Score:
Below,
On, or Above
Level
Math Score:
Below,
On, or
Above Level
ELL/ESL
State
Standards:
PALS
RDG
M
W
SS/H
S
Special Education
(GT, IEP, and 504)
A
below
on
no
PALS – Yes
RDG – No
M – Yes
W – No
SS/H – No
S – Yes
504 – behavior Plan
B
on
below
No
PALS – Yes
RDG – Yes
M – Yes
W – Yes
SS/H – Yes
S – Yes
IEP – auditory
Other
(This is where you may
add your own anecdotal
notes.)
Student
RDG Score:
Below,
On, or Above
Level
Math Score:
Below,
On, or
Above Level
ELL/ESL
State
Standards:
PALS
RDG
M
W
SS/H
S
Special Education
(GT, IEP, and 504)
C
above
above
No
PALS – Yes
RDG – Yes
M – Yes
W – Yes
SS/H – Yes
S – Yes
GT
D
below
below
ELL
PALS – No
RDG – No
M – Yes
W – No
SS/H – No
S – No
504 – language/
vocabulary support
F
on
above
No
PALS – Yes
RDG – Yes
M – Yes
W – Yes
SS/H – Yes
S – Yes
No
G
below
below
no
PALS- No
RDG- No
M- No
W- No
SS/H- No
S- No
IEP – extra time, exams
read aloud, shortened
assignments
H
above
on
no
PALS – Yes
RDG – Yes
M – Yes
W – Yes
SS/H – Yes
S – Yes
none
Other
(This is where you may
add your own anecdotal
notes.)
Student
RDG Score:
Below,
On, or Above
Level
Math Score:
Below,
On, or
Above Level
ELL/ESL
State
Standards:
PALS
RDG
M
W
SS/H
S
Special Education
(GT, IEP, and 504)
I
on
on
ELL
PALS – Yes
RDG – Yes
M – Yes
W – Yes
SS/H – Yes
S – Yes
none
J
below
on
no
PALS – No
RDG – No
M – Yes
W – No
SS/H – No
S – Yes
504 -needs alt. forms
K
on
on
no
PALS – Yes
RDG – Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
None
L
on
below
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- No
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- No
none
M
on
on
ESL
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H – Yes
S – Yes
504-vocabulary
support as needed
Other
(This is where you may
add your own anecdotal
notes.)
Student
RDG Score:
Below,
On, or Above
Level
Math Score:
Below,
On, or
Above Level
ELL/ESL
State
Standards:
PALS
RDG
M
W
SS/H
S
Special Education
(GT, IEP, and 504)
N
above
above
no
PALS – Yes
RDG – Yes
M – Yes
W – Yes
SS/H – Yes
S – Yes
GT
O
below
below
no
PALS- No
RDG- No
M- No
W- No
SS/H- No
S- No
IEP
P
below
on
ELL
PALS- No
RDG- No
M- Yes
W- No
SS/H- No
S – No
IEP- language support,
extended time on
exams
Q
on
above
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
GT
R
below
below
no
PALS- No
RDG- No
M- No
W- No
SS/H- No
S- No
none
Other
(This is where you may
add your own anecdotal
notes.)
Student
RDG Score:
Below,
On, or Above
Level
Math Score:
Below,
On, or
Above Level
ELL/ESL
State
Standards:
PALS
RDG
M
W
SS/H
S
Special Education
(GT, IEP, and 504)
S
on
on
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
GT
T
above
on
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- No
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- No
504- behavior plan
U
on
on
ESL
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
none
V
on
above
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
none
W
below
below
ESL
PALS – No
RDG- No
M- No
W- No
SS/H- No
S- No
IEP- language support,
extended time,
shortened
assignments
Other
(This is where you may
add your own anecdotal
notes.)
Student
RDG Score:
Below,
On, or Above
Level
Math Score:
Below,
On, or
Above Level
ELL/ESL
State
Standards:
PALS
RDG
M
W
SS/H
S
Special Education
(GT, IEP, and 504)
X
above
below
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- No
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- No
none
Y
below
on
no
PALS- No
RDG- No
M- Yes
W- No
SS/H- No
S- No
none
Z
on
on
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
none
AA
above
on
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
504- behavior
modification plan,
social skills
BB
below
below
no
PALS- No
RDG- No
M- No
W- No
SS/H- No
S- No
no
Other
(This is where you may
add your own anecdotal
notes.)
Student
RDG Score:
Below,
On, or Above
Level
Math Score:
Below,
On, or
Above Level
ELL/ESL
State
Standards:
PALS
RDG
M
W
SS/H
S
Special Education
(GT, IEP, and 504)
CC
on
below
no
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- No
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
no
DD
above
on
ESL
PALS- Yes
RDG- Yes
M- Yes
W- Yes
SS/H- Yes
S- Yes
GT
Other
(This is where you may
add your own anecdotal
notes.)
Scenario Classroom Results
For each stage of the thematic unit you create, you are asked to reflect on how you may revise the stage
(1, 2, or 3) based on your classroom results. For the purpose of your reflection, use the results below
based on a classroom sample size of 15.
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Overall, 66% of students met the expectation (10 students)
14% of regular education students did not meet the expectation (2 students)
1 ELL student met the expectation
1 ELL student did not meet the expectation
1 IEP or 504 student did not meet the expectation
1
The World Around Us: Ocean Diversity and Caring for the Environment
Sabrina Howell
SNHU
2
The World Around Us: Ocean Diversity and Caring for the Environment
Performance Task (T): Create the performance tasks to assess key knowledge and skills.
• Create ocean zone jars to help students learn about the many ocean zones.
• Create ‘oceanic artwork’ (sea animal forms, for example) using recycled toilet
paper rolls, bottles and other materials.
• Examples: higher-order cognitive skills, projects, numerous intelligence instances
o The instructor poses questions about the ocean as a habitat for diverse living species and
allows pupils to respond.
o Showing a chart with illustrations of ocean species and asking students to name them.
Other Evidence (OE): Describe other evidence that needs to be collected based on completion of
Stage 1.
• Examples: quizzes, skill checks, writing prompt
• Exit slips- this technique has the students circle emojis that represent their degree
of knowledge. It is better than having students write or draw what they learned or
areas for growth. Students will circle any given emoji and comment on it, or the
instructor will ask why they chose that emoji.
• Dipsticks- This is a unique sort of formative assessment. This is a quick and
simple method to relax after a lesson. Students will be asked to create a sketch to
demonstrate any new information they have learned. Finally, they will think-pairshare with a classmate and discuss any new content.
Student self-assessment and reflection (SA)
• Example: Learners evaluate and remark on their own work and comprehension.
• Peer-review exercises are an excellent way for learners to gain experience
assessing work and using evaluation criteria. This aids in the development of
skills that will be valuable in appraising individual projects. This enables pupils to
seek out opposing viewpoints and respond to criticism.
What understandings or goals will be assessed throughout this task? (G)
• Students will get to understand the ocean’s vastness as well as the marine organisms that
live in each zone. Students will define, identify, and demonstrate pollution. This will
emphasize the need for recycling as well as how pollution may affect living beings and
pollution sources. Displays will be created at home with the assistance of parents.
With what criteria will student products and performances be evaluated?
• The students will be evaluated through an oral interview.
o Every learner will be questioned one-on-one in order to evaluate their speaking
and listening abilities. This is something that you can accomplish in class.
â–ª To determine what each student has learned, ask questions that use
grammatical structures and vocabulary from the lecture.
What student products and performances will provide evidence of desired understandings?
•
The oceanic zone jars will help you understand the enormity of the ocean. This will be a
3
•
•
•
good beginning place for learning about different aquatic creatures.
By starting with the most basic level, the student may dedicate the required time to
studying that zone and broadening their awareness of ocean life.
Using and recycling products raises awareness that harmful objects that we often use on a
daily basis may have an impact on the environment.
Pollution and its impact on the ocean will be discussed, and students will demonstrate
their knowledge of an ocean species or anything relevant to the ocean.
What are technology options acceptable to demonstrate evidence of desired understandings?
(IT)
• Show learners a video about ocean life and pollution.
o This will enable a variety of learning methodologies to be used while also
engaging children.
• On the boat, audiobooks will also be used (reading level and comprehension appropriate).
o This will greatly benefit the development of comprehension by allowing students
to hear the various terms and subjects discussed out loud and disputed.
o This, too, will cater to various learning styles.
• Students constructing an ocean display out of repurposed materials will be photographed
(with parental permission).
o Photographs will be printed and mailed to you.
EDU 615 Thematic Unit Template
Thematic Unit Cover Page
Note: You can use, improve, and build upon any previously created work from the SNHU design
courses as you work on this template.
Unit Title: The World Around Us: Ocean Diversity and Caring for the Environment
Grade Level: Grade 2
Topic Areas: Environmental Studies
Standards being used (general—state/grade/subject):
Time Frame: 3 weeks
Description of Classroom/Students:
Brief Summary of Unit (including curricular context, unit goals, and differentiation strategies):
Stage 1: Identify Desired Results (Milestone One)
WHERETO Codes (These codes are here for your easy reference.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Specific Standards (G)
Questions (Q)
Prior Knowledge (P)
Understanding (U)
Knowledge (K)
Skills (S)
Tasks (T)
Other Evidence (OE)
Self-Assessment (SA)
Instructional Technology (IT)
Preplanning: Based on your classroom profile, write an overview demonstrating your knowledge of the
spectrum and needs of your students. This will be the basis for your differentiation of your thematic unit
throughout this course. Provide a brief rationale for how you would utilize this data based on relevant
theory.
Grade two students in the regular classroom have access to a variety of materials and tools to help them
through the subject. Microsoft Stream will be used to display learning videos and photographs of
ecosystems and aquatic life. The use of iPads and audio books will substantially improve the students’
learning experience. Flashcards will be necessary and will enhance the social interaction. Students will
work both on their own and in in groups. According to the classroom profile, the educator’s capacity to
display understanding of the range and needs of the kids is crucial for their success. To begin, the
present classroom contains 15 pupils of varying abilities and accommodations.
Established Goals:
Specific Standards (G)
List the specific standards selected for your unit. (Remember that your unit is only covering three weeks,
so adjust the number of standards you select so that they can be met in a three-week time frame given
the nature of your class profile.)
Below are some of the standards to be included:
4.1.1. A- “Involves identifying as well as describing the basic needs of living things in a habitat”
(Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 2021). This criterion requires students to identify and learn
about factors within an environment that are required for creatures to live.
4.4.1. C- “Entails describing an animal’s life cycles of different animals in a habitat” (Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, 2021). This criterion requires students to identify and learn about factors within an
environment that are required for creatures to live.
4.5.1. A- “Entails Identifying resources that individuals use from the environment” (Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, 2021).
What essential questions will be considered (Q)?
• Based on standards
•
•
•
•
•
How well can you respect the environment?
What types of ocean life lives in the ocean?
what kind of living things live in the ocean?
What is the ocean made up of? (i.e., water?
Did you know there is salt? Do we utilize any of these resources in our everyday life?)
What understandings are desired (U)?
• Students will understand . . . (One understanding per essential question)
• The natural environment is beautiful and should be taken care of.
• The world generally is diverse and is not only home to humans.
• Humans should play a leading role in caring for environments.
• There are many natural resources that humans utilize.
• Other living creatures and aquatic life rely on people to keep the environment clean.
What prior knowledge is required (P)?
• How will student prior knowledge related to this thematic unit be assessed?
Students must have a basic knowledge of what animals/mammals reside in the water and what
noises they produce. Students will also need to be able to recognize these aquatic species. Learners
will already need to understand that the ocean is formed of water, but they will also learn about
ocean zones and that it is salt water. Students will be required to identify which species dwell in the
ocean and which do not in order to test past knowledge. Observational notes can be made.
Assessments can assess if a student understands the distinction between fresh and salt water. Also,
if the pupils are aware of any natural resources that they now use.
What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit? These should be directly
linked to the essential questions.
• Students will know . . . (K)
•
•
•
•
To connect with their environment and contribute to conservation.
Appreciation for their surroundings and the diversity that exists.
To relate with others and learn about diversity and respect.
To learn how to identify different species and to care for the environment and natural
resources.
•
Students will be able to . . . (S)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Determine the various ocean zones.
Identify several ocean creatures and environments.
Determine what conservation is and how it may assist.
How to protect the environment by reducing pollution.
Determine the natural resources that people rely on.
Determine the distinctions between fresh water and salt water.
List and define instructional technology to be used to support all learners. (IT)
Stage 1 Differentiated Desired Results
Using tools like Text Grabber to adjust the intended outcome to match the students’
needs is a handy approach to acquire translation services for ESL/ELL students. This in addition
to improving communication will also improve the learning of ESL/ELL students. A revolving
brainstorm will be used to retrieve past knowledge. Banners and posters featuring a phrase and
an idea will be displayed in each of the four classroom corners of the room. Learners’ opinions,
thoughts, and prior knowledge will be incorporated to the posters as they walk about. This
provides a useful starting point for the unit theme and aids in lesson/curriculum design. I plan to
make classes visually appealing for ESL/ELL and IEP students. Most significantly, I shall refrain
from just issuing commands in the air. When feasible, classroom procedures shall be written.
Any difficult topics will be diagrammed or assisted by visual aids (pictures or videos). It is also
necessary to model process stages, demonstrating to the learner what has to be done.
Stage 1 Reflection on Desired Results:
• At the moment, five learners have been determined to be reading below their grade level.
o It will be critical to guide such youngsters through the unit. Lower level ocean life books
will help these students build a knowledge of the lesson and with comprehension. In
addition, using closed captioning and audio books helps lay the groundwork for these
youngsters to begin experiencing words in motion.
• Students who read above their grade level still need to be challenged.
o The learners can go further into materials beyond their expected reading levels and
draw connections to better comprehend their surroundings. The students may be
expected to read books ranging from first to third grade levels for this group. Obviously,
notes will be taken to verify vocabulary and comprehension mastery. Learners will be
questioned about what they are reading.
Reflection on the desired results
Using the scenario classroom findings, it will be necessary to form four distinct groups. Let each
group focus on the needs of the children and will be able to assist each individual student’s progress.
Group activities will benefit not only the complete group, but also individual learning. Students can
demonstrate their expertise individually after completing a group exercise. Interviews with the learners
will be performed to identify the unit concept’s strengths and faults. Students will be required to
describe and grasp a topic. As previously stated, each learner will have an individual meeting in addition
to group meetings. This is critical for introspection and will reveal individual learners’ strengths and
faults. Learners will demonstrate what works for them and where I can improve. This will also help me
create any additional steps needed to prepare the students for success with the topic. I may also ask the
learner what interests them as well as what activities they think would help them learn.
Scenario Classroom Results
In each stage of the thematic unit you create, you are asked to reflect on how you may revise the stage
(1, 2, or 3) based on your classroom results. For the purpose of your reflection, use the results below
based on a classroom sample size of 15.
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•
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Overall, 66% of students met the expectation (10 students)
14% of regular education students did not meet the expectation (2 students)
1 ELL student met the expectation
1 ELL student did not meet the expectation
1 IEP or 504 student did not meet the expectation
I will continue to improve on the understanding of ocean life and the vocabulary associated for the
pupils who reached the requirement. I shall also continue to involve them in conservation discussions.
Two pupils did not satisfy the standard (13 percent). I will use the two pupils who did not fulfill the
expectations’ interests to teach topics and develop understanding of ocean life. They are both
passionate about music. The new objective will be to utilize music to help students learn and grasp new
concepts as well as to teach about ocean life. The expectation was met by all ELL pupils. The
continuance of language supports to teach new ideas and knowledge growth will be used for ELL
students who met the expectations. The ESL student did not satisfy the standard. I will continue to
provide services to the ELL kid who did not reach the expectations. I will consider looking for audio
assistance to help with translation of new phrases during one-on-one education to benefit this student.
For instance, a CD that discusses ocean life including both English and Spanish.
Stage 2: Determine Acceptable Evidence
WHERETO Codes (These codes are here for your easy reference.)
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•
•
•
•
•
•
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•
Specific Standards (G)
Questions (Q)
Prior Knowledge (P)
Understanding (U)
Knowledge (K)
Skills (S)
Tasks (T)
Other Evidence (OE)
Self-Assessment (SA)
Instructional Technology (IT)
What evidence will show that students understand?
Performance Task (T):
• Make ocean zone jars to aid learning about the different ocean zones.
• Make ‘oceanic artwork’ (ocean animal shapes, etc.) out of recycled bottles, toilet paper
rolls, and other materials.
• Examples: projects, higher-order thinking skills, multiple intelligences
• The teacher asks questions related to ocean as habitat to various living organisms and allow the
students to answer.
• Displaying a chart with drawings showing ocean animals and asking the learners to name the
animals.
What other evidence needs to be collected in light of Stage 1 (OE)? These are formative assessments.
• Examples: quizzes, skill check, writing prompt
• Dipsticks- This is a different type of formative evaluation. This is a quick and easy way to
unwind after a class. Students will be required to make a drawing to illustrate any new
knowledge they have gained. Finally, they will think-pair-share and discuss any new
material with a classmate.
•
Exit slips- instead of having students write or sketch what they understood or areas for
improvement, this method has students circle emojis that signify their level of
comprehension. Students will circle any given emoji and make a remark about it, or the
instructor will inquire why they picked that emoji.
Student self-assessment and reflection (SA)
• Example: Students assess and reflect on their own work and understanding
• Peer-assessment exercises are a great approach for students to experience examining
work and applying evaluation criteria. This helps to acquire abilities that will be useful
for evaluating individual projects. This allows students to seek out alternative points of
view and comment on criticism.
Stage 2 Assessment Task Blueprint
What understandings or goals will be assessed throughout this task? (G)
• Learners will get an understanding of the ocean’s immensity and the marine species that
dwells in each zone. Pollution will be defined, identified, and shown by students. This will
highlight the importance of recycling and how pollution may have an influence on living
organisms and pollution sources. Displays will be produced at home with the help of
parents.
With what criteria will student products and performances be evaluated?
• An oral interview will be used to assess the pupils.
o Each student will be interviewed one-on-one to assess their listening and speaking skills.
This is something that can be done during class.
â–ª In order to understand what each student has absorbed, ask questions that
employ grammatical structures and terminology that the class has learnt.
What student products and performances will provide evidence of desired understandings?
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•
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•
The ocean zone jars will aid with comprehending the vastness of the ocean. This will serve as a
starting point for learning about various water species.
By beginning with each level, the learner may devote the necessary time to learning about that
zone and expanding their understanding of ocean life.
Using and recycling products will increase awareness that bad items that we often use every day
may have an influence on the environment.
Pollution and its influence on the ocean will be discussed.
Students will also exhibit their understanding of an ocean animal or anything related to the
ocean.
What technology options are acceptable to demonstrate evidence of desired understandings? (IT)
• Play movies to learners themed on oceanic life and pollution.
o This will allow varied learning approaches to be met while also engaging kids.
• Audio books on the water will also be used (reading level and comprehension appropriate).
o This will considerably aid in the development of understanding by allowing pupils to
hear the various words and topics spoken out and debated.
o This, too, will cater to various learning styles.
• Students working on their ocean exhibit using recycled things will be photographed (with
parental permission).
o Photographs will be printed and mailed to you.
Stage 2 Differentiated Acceptable Evidence
• How will you modify the determined acceptable evidence to meet the needs of all students in
your classroom based on your classroom profile? This may mean adjusting the task, the
assessment, or the evaluation criteria to meet the needs for individual students. Use your Stage
2 draft and add the differentiated elements using the Track Changes function in Microsoft Word
so that your instructor knows what changes you have made based on instructor feedback and
added differentiation.
•
•
There is a need to provide a number of entrance locations to guarantee that students’
varying talents, capabilities, and needs are factored in.
o “Learners then require diverse chances to showcase their knowledge
dependent on the instruction, which is why differentiated evaluation is
necessary.”
The fundamentals of differentiated education and evaluation are that choice is essential
to the process. Selection of learning activity as well as selection of evaluation.
o Learning tasks always take into account the learners’ strengths and
shortcomings.
o Student groupings will differ; some students will work better solo, while others
will function better in varied group situations.
o Multidisciplinary intelligence is considered, as well as the pupils’ learning and
thinking methods.
o Lessons are real in order for pupils to develop connections.
o Project-based and problem-based learning are critical components of
differentiated instruction and evaluation.
Stage 2 Reflection on Acceptable Evidence
• How would you modify the determined acceptable evidence based on student achievement?
(Respond to the scenario classroom results below.)
•
All learning outcomes are identified through differentiated instruction and evaluation. This
indicates prior understanding of a subject. I will evaluate task completion, the capacity to
collaborate and listen to others, participation levels, self/other respect, the ability to talk,
explain, draw connections, dispute, support viewpoints, infer, reason, re-tell, describe, report,
forecast, and so on. Identifiers for both social and knowledge skills should be included in the
assessment.
Scenario Classroom Results
In each stage of the thematic unit you create, you are asked to reflect on how you may revise the stage
(1, 2, or 3) based on your classroom results. For the purpose of your reflection, use the results below
based on a classroom sample size of 15.
o In total, 10 pupils met the standard (66 percent).
o Two pupils did not satisfy the standard (13 percent).
o All ELL pupils met the standard.
o 1 ESL student did not satisfy the standard.
o All but one IEP kid meets the standard.
Stage 3: Plan Learning Experiences
What sequence of teaching and learning experiences will equip students to engage with, develop, and
demonstrate the desired understandings? Use the following Stage 3 Charted Elements table to list the
key teaching and learning activities in sequence. Incorporation of technology must be integrated into
your learning experiences plan to effectively differentiate instruction promoting inclusion of all learners
using relevant theory. Code each entry with the appropriate initials of the WHERETO elements. (L)
WHERETO Codes (These codes are here for your easy reference.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Specific Standards (G)
Questions (Q)
Prior Knowledge (P)
Understanding (U)
Knowledge (K)
Skills (S)
Tasks (T)
Other Evidence (OE)
Self-Assessment (SA)
Instructional Technology (IT)
Begin here: Use a numbered list to make charting below correlate with your plan for your
sequence of the three-week thematic unit.
Stage 3 Charted Elements
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Stage 3 Differentiated Learning Experiences—Incorporation of Technology:
• How will you modify the learning experiences to meet the needs of all students in your
classroom? This may mean adjusting some needs for individual students. Use your Stage 3 draft
and add the differentiated elements using the Track Changes function in Microsoft Word so that
your instructor knows what changes you have made based on instructor feedback and added
differentiation.
Stage 3 Reflection on Learning Experiences:
• How would you modify the learning experience plan based on student achievement? (Respond
to the scenario classroom results below.)
Scenario Classroom Results
In each stage of the thematic unit you create, you are asked to reflect on how you may revise the stage
(1, 2, or 3) based on your classroom results. For the purpose of your reflection, use the results below
based on a classroom sample size of 15.
•
•
•
•
•
Overall, 66% of students met the expectation (10 students)
14% of regular education students did not meet the expectation (2 students)
1 ELL student met the expectation
1 ELL student did not meet the expectation
1 IEP or 504 student did not meet the expectation

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