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I’m working on a nutrition report and need a sample draft to help me learn.

I began to work on this research paper and could not finish it. On the outline I have multiple sources listed that I used or intended to use throughout the draft. The finished paper needs to be 10 pages minimum and apa 7th edition. All the guidelines are on the rubric attached.

there should be enough information in the outline I provided and the draft I began?

I added links to sources that I thought would be beneficial to add to the paper

HE 290 Health Research Methods
“My Way” Literature Review Scoring Rubric
Name: ___________________________________
Grade: _________/200
Introduction
Paragraph(s)
20
Research topic is clearly
stated, overall importance of
the topic is supported by at
least 1 source
10
Research topic is unclear,
and/or importance of topic is
not supported by 1 source
0
Research topic is not stated,
relevance is not described
from a cited source
Body Paragraphs
25
Organizes supporting
paragraphs by topic and
synthesizes information
across at least 8 sources
15
Organizes supporting
paragraphs by topic and
synthesizes information 8
sources
8
Organizes supporting
paragraphs by source and
does not synthesize info
across sources
Abstract
15
Tells the complete story in a
clear and concise manner.
Incorporates –into, methods,
findings and conclusion
0
Does not have an abstract
Conclusion Paragraph
20
Clear Summary of research
findings that builds an
argument for why the
current study is needed
10
All paragraphs are well
written (grammar, typos,
sentence structure, etc.) and
ideas flow together
8
Tells most of the story in a
clear and concise manner.
Incorporates some of the –
into, methods, findings and
conclusion
10
Summary of research findings
and/or connection to why the
current study is needed is
unclear
5
All paragraphs are well
written but ideas do not flow
together
10
Writing is uses a direct
technical writing style that
excludes “fluff”
40
All factual claims are cited
(excludes general
knowledge facts)
25
Grammar usage and writing
style comply with APA and
correct use of APA in-text
citations (< 5 errors) 5 Writing is mostly uses a direct technical writing style, but some “fluff” exists 25 1-2 factual claims are not cited (excludes general knowledge facts) 15 Between 6-10 APA grammar and/or writing style errors and/or APA in-text citation errors 0 Writing is uses a prosaic writing style that often includes “fluff” 10 3-4 factual claims are not cited (excludes general knowledge facts) 8 Between 11-15 APA grammar and/or writing style errors and/or APA intext citation errors 10 6 or more peer-reviewed journal articles/reports all published from 2012present included, all are well connected to overall topic 10 Corrected references attached 5 Follows APA format, title clearly states what the paper covers 10 Paper is 10 or more pages 8 6 or more peer-reviewed journal articles/reports all published from 2012-present included, but not all are connected to overall topic 4 3-5 peer-reviewed journal articles/reports and s published all published from 2012-present included, but not all are connected to overall topic 0 References missing Readability & Flow of Ideas Conciseness Citing Factual Claims APA Scientific Writing Proficiency Quality of Research Articles Attach Corrected References Title Page Page length 5 References attached, but not corrected 2 Only follows APA format OR title clearly states what the paper covers 5 Paper is 1-2 pages short of minimum page length 0 Organizes supporting paragraphs by source and does not synthesize info across sources, or body paragraphs missing entirely 0 Summary of research findings is not stated and no connection is made to why the current study is needed 0 All paragraphs are poorly written and ideas do not flow together 0 No title page 0 Paper is 3+ pages short of minimum page length 0 5+ factual claims are not cited (excludes general knowledge facts) 0 More than 15 APA grammar and/or writing style errors and/or APA intext citation errors 0 0-2 peer-reviewed journal articles/reports and 0 websites published all published from 2012present included 1 The Effects of a Gluten-Free Diet on Individuals without Celiac Disease Miranda Franco Department of Science, Monmouth University HE 290 02: Health Research Methods Dr. Mercx April 18, 2021 2 Gluten is a term for the prolamin storage proteins that are found in common cereal grains including, but not limited to, wheat, barley and rye (Hill, 2019, p. 1). Two of these proteins are gliadin, that allows bread to rise, and glutenins, which gives strength and elasticity to bread. Because of these properties, gluten is often used as a food additive in processed foods. Thus gluten is present in not only common grains, but also sauces and spices, such as soy sauce. The common presence of gluten in foods makes avoiding it a difficult process for individuals. For those with celiac disease and other non-celiac gluten sensitivities, following a gluten free diet is a medical necessity. However, as the GFD has gained more popularity, it has become a trend for people to follow to simply lose weight. While gluten can be harmful to specific individuals, the absence of it in the diet of others can be harmful as well. The consumption of foods containing gluten can have a variety of adverse effects on different people. Upon eating gluten, individuals with a sensitivity of any degree may experience both intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. The most well-known health condition related to gluten is celiac disease. Many people share a common perception that celiac disease is synonymous with any gastrointestinal issue that arises from the consumption of gluten. However, gluten consumption can affect celiac patients on a larger scale. Additionally, not all negative responses to the consumption of gluten are the result of celiac disease. Celiac disease is classified as a “chronic immune-mediated enteropathy driven by dietary gluten,” (Katri et al., 2019, p. 1). The immune response related to the ingestion of gluten in celiac individuals can manifest itself in more ways than one, which often leads to misdiagnosis of celiac disease. The most common response is malabsorption of foods containing gluten but the symptoms can extend beyond that to multiorgan responses. As for intestinal symptoms, celiac 3 patients can experience irregular bowel movements, gastralgia, emesis, and excessive flatulence (Katri et al., 2019, p. 6). ADD ADDTL INTESTINAL SYMPTOMS As aforementioned, celiac disease manifests itself in other organs outside of the gastrointestinal tract. A common extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease is dermatitis herpetiformis, which is a gluten-induced symptom. When triggered by gluten, this autoimmune reaction causes “itchy papules and vesicles on the elbows, knees and buttocks,” (Popp and Mäki, 2019, p. 4). In a similar fashion, neurological complications are immune mediated responses to gluten entering the bloodstream of celiac individuals. (Popp and Mäki, 2019, p. 5). Many patients with neurological conditions related to celiac disease do not also display the common gastrointestinal conditions of celiac disease (Mearns et. al., 2019, p. 2). Two of the most common neurological manifestations of celiac disease are gluten ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The onset of both of the mentioned conditions is typically insidious, thus a celiac patient may be unaware of his or her diagnosis until reaching the approximate age of 55. A celiac patient may spend the majority of his or her life consuming gluten, causing further detriment to his or her health unbeknownst to them. Gluten ataxia refers to the damage of the critical central nervous system structure, the cerebellum, by consumption of gluten. Symptoms include “difficulty with arm and leg control, gait instability, poor coordination, loss of fine motor skills such as writing, problems with talking, and visual issues” (Mearns et. al., 2019, p. 2). Celiac disease can not only affect the central nervous system but also can have an affect on the peripheral nervous system as well. Gluten-induced peripheral neuropathy, also known as gluten neuropathy, refers to the damage of 4 the nerves of the peripheral nervous system. The nerve damage causes numbness, tingling, and pain in the extremities of celiac patients with gluten neuropathy (Mearns et. al., 2019, p. 2). The sole cure for many manifestations of celiac disease is the adherence to a gluten free diet. Without the ingestion of gluten, an immune response will not be triggered. Thus all the symptoms that arise from the immune response will not occur. Over time, celiac patients can heal most or all of the intestinal mucosa (Itzlinger, 2018, p. 2). Miranda Franco Professor Mercx HE 290 02 Introduction: For those with celiac disease and other non-celiac gluten sensitivities, following a gluten free diet is a medical necessity. However, as the GFD has gained more popularity, it has become a trend for people to follow to simply lose weight. While gluten can be harmful to specific individuals, the absence of it in the diet of others can be harmful as well. Body: 1. How gluten affects those with celiac disease a. Individuals that have either celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity are instructed to follow a gluten free diet. (Bonder et. al, 2016) b. Gluten free diets have become trendy amongst health-conscious individuals but not all people need to follow this diet. 2. The benefits of non-celiac individuals following a GFD (gluten free diet) a. Many state that researchers find that following a GFD can affect the “enhancement of athletic performance and treatment of autism, rheumatoid arthritis, and psychiatric disorders” (Lerner et. al, 2019). 3. Negative effects of following a GFD in non-celiac individuals a. “There are potential negative consequences of hypervigilance to a strict glutenfree diet” (Wolf et. al 2018). b. “The study concluded that more gluten consumption is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, suggesting that those who do not suffer from celiac disease or non-celiac gluten/wheat sensitivity should not avoid gluten” (Lebwohl et. al 2017). Conclusion: Not all individuals should adapt a gluten free diet if they are not celiac. There are benefits to following a gluten free diet, however the negatives to those who are not celiac are far greater. References: Bonder, M. J., Tigchelaar, E. F., Cai, X., Trynka, G., Maria, C. C. H., Zhong, H., . . . Zhernakova, A. (2016). The influence of a short-term gluten-free diet on the human gut microbiome. Genome Medicine, 8doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.monmouth.edu/10.1186/s13073-016-0295-y Jericho, H. , Sansotta, N. & Guandalini, S. (2017). Extraintestinal Manifestations of Celiac Disease. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 65(1), 75–79. Doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001420. Kim, H., Demyen, M. F., Mathew, J., Kothari, N., Feurdean, M., & Ahlawat, S. K. (2017). Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular risk in gluten-free followers without celiac disease in the united states: Results from the national health and nutrition examination survey 2009-2014. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 62(9), 2440-2448. doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.monmouth.edu/10.1007/s10620-017-4583-1 Lerner, B. A., Green, P. H. R., & Lebwohl, B. (2019). Going against the grains: Gluten-free diets in patients without celiac Disease—Worthwhile or not?Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 64(7), 1740-1747. doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.monmouth.edu/10.1007/s10620-019-05663-x Margaret Boyd, G., Bigwood, C., & Prosad Paul, S. (2017). When gluten free is harmful. British Journal of Nursing, 26(15), 844. https://doiorg.ezproxy.monmouth.edu/10.12968/bjon.2017.26.15.844 Study finds a gluten-free diet in adults without celiac disease may increase risk of cardiovascular disease. (2017, May 04). Retrieved February 22, 2021, from https://celiac.org/about-thefoundation/featured-news/2017/05/study-finds-gluten-free-diet-adults-without-celiac-diseasemay-increase-risk-cardiovascular-disease/ Wall st. cheat sheet: Why you shouldn't follow a gluten-free diet (2016). . Chatham: Newstex. Retrieved from https://ezproxy.monmouth.edu/login?url=https://www-proquestcom.ezproxy.monmouth.edu/blogs,-podcasts,-websites/wall-st-cheat-sheet-why-you-shouldntfollow/docview/1797620094/se-2?accountid=12532 Wolf, R. L., Lebwohl, B., Lee, A. R., Zybert, P., Reilly, N. R., Cadenhead, J., . . . Green, P. H. R. (2018). Hypervigilance to a gluten-free diet and decreased quality of life in teenagers and adults with celiac disease. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 63(6), 1438-1448. doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.monmouth.edu/10.1007/s10620-018-4936-4 https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/05/what-s-really-behind-gluten-sensitivity - . People with celiac disease are genetically predisposed to launch a self-destructive immune response when a component of gluten called gliadin penetrates their intestinal lining and sets off inflammatory cells in the tissue below. People with a wheat allergy respond to wheat proteins by churning out a class of antibodies called immunoglobulin E that can set off vomiting, itching, and shortness of breath https://celiac.org/gluten-free-living/what-is-gluten/ https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/what-is-gluten#labeling https://search.proquest.com/docview/2466267883/fulltextPDF/D5D05F8625B047C0PQ/1?accou ntid=12532 https://search.proquest.com/docview/2166123327?pq-origsite=summon https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/2/320/htm Katri, L., Carolina, C., Kalle, K., Lundin Knut, E. A., Makharia, G. K., Luisa, M. M., Murray, J. A., Verdu, E. F., & Katri, K. (2019). Coeliac disease (Primer). Nature Reviews: Disease Primers, 5(1)http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41572-018-0054-z DOI:10.1016/j.nut.2020.110944 https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020380 https://journals.lww.com/ajg/Fulltext/2018/10001/Extraintestinal_Manifestation_of_Celiac_Disease_.2569.aspx She was recommended to follow a strict gluten free diet. At her 3 month follow up, MRI head showed improvement in T2 hyperintensities and IgA tissue transglutaminase was Purchase answer to see full attachment

  
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