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The following outline is intended to give you a general idea of the format, content and style that you should aim for in your dramatic analysis paper.

**Remember the general rule: do not assume that I will know what you are speaking about, be clear with your examples and make sure to fully support your argument.**

For your dramatic response paper, you will choose one of the plays you have chosen to write an exploration paper for and write an in-depth analysis on the idea or theme you chose to explore.

Paragraph One: The Introduction

Introduce to your reader exactly what this paper is about, i.e. – “In August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize winning play

Fences,

Troy struggles to release the past and accept a world that is rapidly changing around him.”

Make sure you give some major facts about the piece:

oWho was it written by?

oDid it win any prizes?

oGive us a lead up to the thesis – just a couple sentences.

State your thesis:

Example (you cannot use this):

o“Troy’s failure to leave the past behind him ultimately destroys the family he has worked so hard to maintain and forces them all to confront the growing pains of a family that is required to exist on the underbelly of the American Dream.”

Paragraphs:

The Story

Very brief synopsis of the play. No opinions, just important plots points (no more than 2-3 sentences).

What is the importance of this piece in the theatrical canon?

What things need to be introduced or explained here to help support your argument:

oConcept of the American Dream

oTime period of the play – race relations in America

oAnything else you need to build a foundation for your argument.

Body

Breakdown your argument into a few paragraphs.

oFirst paragraph should start to dig into your thesis.

§Troy’s Past/ What’s holding him back?

oSecond paragraph builds on your first.

§Baseball (Images of racism used to describe past moments)

oThird paragraph builds on your first and second.

§The father/ son relationship.

oFourth paragraph builds on the previous.

§The breaking of the family.

oAnd so on…

The Conclusion

Reiterate your thesis.

Find a new way to show how your examples all support your thesis. Wrap your argument in a bow! Look at what I just proved!

o “It is the death of the patriarch that releases the next generation and allows Cory to pave his own way, free of the trappings and misguided beliefs of the past. ‘Death is indeed the breaking of the generational fever’ (Turner 335). It isn’t that Troy went about teaching their children the wrong way, or that he had the wrong dreams, but that he could not see beyond his past to believe that his sons could achieve something outside of his own misguided perceptions. For Troy, the fallacy of the American Dream is just a representation of its exclusive and ephemeral quality revealing nothing more than the unrealistic expectations we place on ourselves to find happiness in the idea of success that we adamantly pursue.”

Format

Proper heading (first page only, upper left,

do not double space this

)

5-6 pages

Double spaced

12 point font, 1” margins

Make sure to either underline or italicize the title of the play.

Header (starting on second page) right tabbed, “Last name Page #”.

Use three to four sources for your paper. CITE YOUR WORK!

See Purdue Owl MLA Link for further formatting questions.

Final Thoughts

Proofread (Remember 4 or more easily spotted errors will result in a loss 20 points).

Be specific in your observations. Use specific moments from the beginning and end of the performance to support your answers.

Make it your own!

Be interesting, unique, excited, angry, poetic… be yourself!

Avoid any phrases such as “I think” or “Could be” – it undermines your scholarly voice and casts doubt over the validity of your argument.

Readings For Exploration Paper 1:

1.

Medea:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1deyk2kUhV6ozG2w4c…

2.

Twelfth Night:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1bRAyWfdIYxZSMZaV2..

3.

A Doll House:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1It9uIjCJ4nmXm08Rq…

Readings For Exploration Paper 2:

1.Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/18HwkncwROjqbbtfR_…

2. Fences by August Wilson:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/135kFBzIaEUimJQmI3…

3. Notes from the Field:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/130x-nFBimGhR7Qhsa…

4. Mojada by Luis Alfaro:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yGFR42aZpjqoQD8E7…

Estfanous
1
Michil Estfanous
EL-207: Drama
Dr. Prugh
July 20, 2022
Love/Revenge in Euripides’ Medea
Love and revenge are primary themes that Euripides integrates into the play to grab the
audience’s attention. The play begins by providing a background contest of Jason and Medea’s
love and prosperity to fame which progresses into vengeful acts from both parties. Love is a
strong emotion intertwined with every society’s social norm. The playwright uses imaginative
writing to indicate how love and revenge co-existed in Corinth. In this view, it is essential to
understand how the author integrated the theme of love/revenge into Medea using specific
quotes from the play leveraging support from an outside source.
Love and revenge are evident in divergent scenes in the play. Despite Medea’s sacrifice
and commitment to building a family with Jason after moving to Corinth, it is annoying how
Jason decides to remarry. This aspect is evident in the scene where the nurse laments, indicating
how Medea sacrificed a lot because of her love for Jason, “…but that marriage changed, now
they’re enemies” (Euripides, n.d. p 2). The quote matters since it indicates the sudden change in
Jason’s feelings despite their body with Medea fueled her quest for revenge. Jason’s selfishness
and ambition clouded his mind and prevented him from realizing that Medea was willing to do
anything to support their unified growth. Unlike other social unions in Greece, their marriage
“…was not a mere social contract like most Greek marriages” (Manzoor, 2019, p 87). The quote
Estfanous
2
reveals that Medea was willing to help Jason at all costs, while Jason viewed Medea’s presence
in his life as a hindrance to achieving his quest for power, accounting for the ungrateful acts.
Jason’s actions caused her immense pain and suffering, encouraging her to entertain
vengeful thoughts. This is evident when Medea states that she was hurt and lost all respect when
Jason left her. She indicates that any woman in her position would have similar reactions if her
marriage were violated, turning her into a vengeful beast with “…no heart more desperate for
blood than hers” (Euripides, n.d., p 8). Love is what kept Jason and Medea together while they
suffered in exile. She created a life around her husband and children, which Jason ruthlessly tore
apart by abandoning them in a strange land. Manzoor (2019) indicates that Medea had to kill her
brother for safe passage to the Argonauts. Her love for Jason was so strong that familial relations
could not compare to the thickness.
Jason understood the repercussions of his actions. He knew Medea was deeply hurt and
destroyed by his decision to divorce and marry the King’s daughter. King Creon also had similar
fears since Medea had publicly displayed her desire for revenge against her former husband and
his new bride. This is evident when King Creon tells Medea, “I trust you even less than
previously” (Euripides, n.d., p 10). The quote is essential because it elucidates how the King did
not want to wait for Medea to exact his revenge on her daughter, Jason, thus exiling Medea and
her children from Corinth. Medea sought justice in her plea to the King to understand her
perspective. However, the King could not enforce justice since his involvement in the issue was
personal. His love for her daughter and kingdom surpassed his desire to ensure he addressed
Medea’s issues (Manzoor, 2019, p 89). Revenge was not Medea’s best alternative, but given that
society turned a blind eye to her concerns, it seemed like a justified approach.
Estfanous
3
Conclusion
Euripides’ Medea is a creative play that highlights the aspects of love and revenge, using
Jason and Medea as the main focus of the theme’s progression. The connection of three specific
quotes from the play and an outside source was effective in facilitating comprehension of how
love turns to revenge. Euripides reveals that betraying a spouse has divergent negative
repercussions, including vengeful acts since it’s the only remedy to a heart that hurts.
Estfanous
4
References
Euripides (n.d.) Medea
Manzoor, Sohana. “Translating Medea’s Infanticide: A Reading of Euripides’ Medea.” A Journal
of English Studies 10 (2019).
Estfanous
1
Michil Estfanous
Dr. Prugh
El-207: Drama
8/7/2022
Theater Question
The death of a salesman explores multiple themes, yet the most outstanding one is the
American Dream. This theme is significant in numerous literary pieces, including plays, novels,
and poems. The concept of the American Dream arose from the post-Depression era when
America was coming from a great depression, and the hope for a new America full of
opportunities permeated the nation. It refers to the belief that America contains enough
opportunities for anyone to benefit from as long as they work hard enough and are determined to
achieve the results of their sacrifices and work (Wolak & Peterson 969). Some of the attractions
of the American Dream include the achievement of financial success and wealth, a great family,
and other American comforts. The Death of a Salesman provides a unique interpretation of
the American Dream that encompasses the realities of the challenges that confront those
who spend their lives trying to achieve it through the persona of Willy, the protagonist.
One of the central components of the American Dream is owning a house and building a
home. As the reader experiences the stage directions in the book’s introduction, this quote stands
firm: “Before us is the Salesman’s house. We are aware of towering, angular shapes behind it,
surrounding it on all sides. Only the blue light of the sky falls upon the house and forestage; the
surrounding area shows an angry glow of orange.” (Miller 1). This quote gives a visual
description of the American Dream elements, namely home ownership and ambient
Estfanous
2
surroundings. Homeownership is a desirable goal that has provided wealth generation and
building for many American families as houses retain their value through recessions and
depressions and have a good track record of recovery once such dips end (Goodman and Mayer
35). In this case, the description highlights the central significance of Willy’s house to the
family’s wellbeing. However, by giving the contrast between the house and its surrounding, the
book also alerts the audience to the encroachment and threat that faces the house’s tranquil
existence.
The American Dream is liable to create unrealistic expectations in people that can derail
their progress in life. Willy Loman’s life was all about chasing the elusive Dream, which made
him forget the most important things, including his family. This pursuit led to Willy’s eventual
suicide, yet his unrealistic dreams seem to have rubbed off on his sons Biff and Happy, as seen in
this quote: “Sure, maybe we could buy a ranch. Raise cattle, use our muscles. Men built like we
are should be working out in the open.” (Miller 12). Biff is talking to his brother, and they share
their conviction about the American Dream, a fantasy shared in the West where owning a ranch
is a sign of success and living the Dream. While achievable, this version is far from the brothers’
reach, given their poor financial condition.
Dedicating one’s life to pursuing a dream that alienates a person from their family and
friends can be a fool’s errand. “I realized what a ridiculous lie my whole life has been.” (Miller
81). This quote is not necessarily made about the American Dream but signifies the folly of
following a man whose purpose took him away from his most values and the world. Biff says
these things about his initial impression of his father as a great father and Salesman to emulate.
When he realizes that his father was consumed with the American Dream and that it led to his
Estfanous
3
fall from grace, Biff is ready to accept the necessity of living one’s truth and avoiding the
trappings of the Dream that took his father’s life.
Conclusively, the American Dream provided an essential support system for people after
the Great Depression and generated motivation and hope that propelled the nation to the First
World status it currently occupies. Yet, as Willy Loman’s story proves, the Dream can be a
derailment when pursued blindly and in exclusion of all else that matters.
Estfanous
4
Works Cited
Goodman, Laurie S., and Christopher Mayer. “Homeownership and the American
Dream.” Journal of Economic Perspectives, vol. 32, no. 1, 2018, pp. 31-58.
Miller, A. Death of a salesman: Certain private conversations in two acts and a requiem.
Penguin UK, 2013.
Wolak, Jennifer, and David A. Peterson. “The Dynamic American Dream.” American Journal of
Political Science, vol. 64, no. 4, 2020, pp. 968-981.
Estfanous
5
Drama 1
Love/Revenge in Euripides’ Medea
Love and revenge are primary themes that Euripides integrates into the play to grab the
audience’s attention. The play begins by providing a background contest of Jason and Medea’s
love and prosperity to fame which progresses into vengeful acts from both parties. Love is a
strong emotion intertwined with every society’s social norm. The playwright uses imaginative
writing to indicate how love and revenge co-existed in Corinth. In this view, it is essential to
understand how the author integrated the theme of love/revenge into Medea using specific
quotes from the play leveraging support from an outside source.
Love and revenge are evident in divergent scenes in the play. Despite Medea’s sacrifice
and commitment to building a family with Jason after moving to Corinth, it is annoying how
Jason decides to remarry. This aspect is evident in the scene where the nurse laments, indicating
how Medea sacrificed a lot because of her love for Jason, “…but that marriage changed, now
they’re enemies” (Euripides, n.d. p 2). The quote matters since it indicates the sudden change in
Jason’s feelings despite their body with Medea fueled her quest for revenge. Jason’s selfishness
and ambition clouded his mind and prevented him from realizing that Medea was willing to do
anything to support their unified growth. Unlike other social unions in Greece, their marriage
“…was not a mere social contract like most Greek marriages” (Manzoor, 2019, p 87). The quote
reveals that Medea was willing to help Jason at all costs, while Jason viewed Medea’s presence
in his life as a hindrance to achieving his quest for power, accounting for the ungrateful acts.
Jason’s actions caused her immense pain and suffering, encouraging her to entertain
vengeful thoughts. This is evident when Medea states that she was hurt and lost all respect when
Jason left her. She indicates that any woman in her position would have similar reactions if her
Drama 2
marriage were violated, turning her into a vengeful beast with “…no heart more desperate for
blood than hers” (Euripides, n.d., p 8). Love is what kept Jason and Medea together while they
suffered in exile. She created a life around her husband and children, which Jason ruthlessly tore
apart by abandoning them in a strange land. Manzoor (2019) indicates that Medea had to kill her
brother for safe passage to the Argonauts. Her love for Jason was so strong that familial relations
could not compare to the thickness.
Jason understood the repercussions of his actions. He knew Medea was deeply hurt and
destroyed by his decision to divorce and marry the King’s daughter. King Creon also had similar
fears since Medea had publicly displayed her desire for revenge against her former husband and
his new bride. This is evident when King Creon tells Medea, “I trust you even less than
previously” (Euripides, n.d., p 10). The quote is essential because it elucidates how the King did
not want to wait for Medea to exact his revenge on her daughter, Jason, thus exiling Medea and
her children from Corinth. Medea sought justice in her plea to the King to understand her
perspective. However, the King could not enforce justice since his involvement in the issue was
personal. His love for her daughter and kingdom surpassed his desire to ensure he addressed
Medea’s issues (Manzoor, 2019, p 89). Revenge was not Medea’s best alternative, but given that
society turned a blind eye to her concerns, it seemed like a justified approach.
Conclusion
Euripides’ Medea is a creative play that highlights the aspects of love and revenge, using
Jason and Medea as the main focus of the theme’s progression. The connection of three specific
quotes from the play and an outside source was effective in facilitating comprehension of how
Drama 3
love turns to revenge. Euripides reveals that betraying a spouse has divergent negative
repercussions, including vengeful acts since it’s the only remedy to a heart that hurts.
Drama 4
References
Euripides (n.d.) Medea
Manzoor, Sohana. “Translating Medea’s Infanticide: A Reading of Euripides’ Medea.” A Journal
of English Studies 10 (2019).
Drama 1
Theater Question
The death of a salesman explores multiple themes, yet the most outstanding one is the
American Dream. This theme is significant in numerous literary pieces, including plays, novels,
and poems. The concept of the American Dream arose from the post-Depression era when
America was coming from a great depression, and the hope for a new America full of
opportunities permeated the nation. It refers to the belief that America contains enough
opportunities for anyone to benefit from as long as they work hard enough and are determined to
achieve the results of their sacrifices and work (Wolak & Peterson 969). Some of the attractions
of the American Dream include the achievement of financial success and wealth, a great family,
and other American comforts. The Death of a Salesman provides a unique interpretation of
the American Dream that encompasses the realities of the challenges that confront those
who spend their lives trying to achieve it through the persona of Willy, the protagonist.
One of the central components of the American Dream is owning a house and building a
home. As the reader experiences the stage directions in the book’s introduction, this quote stands
firm: “Before us is the Salesman’s house. We are aware of towering, angular shapes behind it,
surrounding it on all sides. Only the blue light of the sky falls upon the house and forestage; the
surrounding area shows an angry glow of orange.” (Miller 1). This quote gives a visual
description of the American Dream elements, namely home ownership and ambient
surroundings. Homeownership is a desirable goal that has provided wealth generation and
building for many American families as houses retain their value through recessions and
depressions and have a good track record of recovery once such dips end (Goodman and Mayer
35). In this case, the description highlights the central significance of Willy’s house to the
Drama 2
family’s wellbeing. However, by giving the contrast between the house and its surrounding, the
book also alerts the audience to the encroachment and threat that faces the house’s tranquil
existence.
The American Dream is liable to create unrealistic expectations in people that can derail
their progress in life. Willy Loman’s life was all about chasing the elusive Dream, which made
him forget the most important things, including his family. This pursuit led to Willy’s eventual
suicide, yet his unrealistic dreams seem to have rubbed off on his sons Biff and Happy, as seen in
this quote: “Sure, maybe we could buy a ranch. Raise cattle, use our muscles. Men built like we
are should be working out in the open.” (Miller 12). Biff is talking to his brother, and they share
their conviction about the American Dream, a fantasy shared in the West where owning a ranch
is a sign of success and living the Dream. While achievable, this version is far from the brothers’
reach, given their poor financial condition.
Dedicating one’s life to pursuing a dream that alienates a person from their family and
friends can be a fool’s errand. “I realized what a ridiculous lie my whole life has been.” (Miller
81). This quote is not necessarily made about the American Dream but signifies the folly of
following a man whose purpose took him away from his most values and the world. Biff says
these things about his initial impression of his father as a great father and Salesman to emulate.
When he realizes that his father was consumed with the American Dream and that it led to his
fall from grace, Biff is ready to accept the necessity of living one’s truth and avoiding the
trappings of the Dream that took his father’s life.
Conclusively, the American Dream provided an essential support system for people after
the Great Depression and generated motivation and hope that propelled the nation to the First
Drama 3
World status it currently occupies. Yet, as Willy Loman’s story proves, the Dream can be a
derailment when pursued blindly and in exclusion of all else that matters.
Works Cited
Goodman, Laurie S., and Christopher Mayer. “Homeownership and the American
Dream.” Journal of Economic Perspectives, vol. 32, no. 1, 2018, pp. 31-58.
Miller, A. Death of a salesman: Certain private conversations in two acts and a requiem.
Penguin UK, 2013.
Drama 4
Wolak, Jennifer, and David A. Peterson. “The Dynamic American Dream.” American Journal of
Political Science, vol. 64, no. 4, 2020, pp. 968-981.

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