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HUM 200 Project Part One: Exploration Document Guidelines and Rubric
Overview
We all share common experiences that can be generally classified within the major themes of art. Examples of these themes include love, mortality, identity,
truth, and beauty. The representation of these themes through various media reveals central beliefs shared by a common people. The comparison of objects
from the humanities with similar themes helps to uncover not only the uniqueness of each respective cultural artifact, but also a shared human consciousness
that transcends time and place.
Your project for this course has two parts. In Project Part One, you will complete an exploration document examining two cultural artifacts that you select,
identifying a theme common to both of them and developing a thesis statement related to the theme and artifacts. You will also identify an audience who would
be interested in your artifacts, theme, and thesis statement. In Project Part Two, you will develop a presentation for your audience. In your presentation, you
will discuss the impact of the cultural artifacts, theme, and thesis statement on both individuals and society, supporting your claims with evidence. You will also
explain how study of the humanities has impacted you both personally and professionally.
In Project Part One, you will demonstrate your mastery of the following course outcomes:
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Illustrate the impact of the humanities on personal and professional experiences
Select appropriate and relevant resources in the humanities in investigating expressions of human creativity
Communicate effectively to specific audiences in examining fundamental aspects of human culture
Apply essential principles of the humanities in exploring major themes of human culture and creativity
Prompt
Choose two cultural artifacts to analyze. These artifacts may take the form of any artistic medium, such as literature, poetry, music, film, dance, painting, and
sculpture, and so on. Then, identify a common theme and compare your examples to one another as expressions of the same theme in different cultural
artifacts. Chapters 3 through 6 in the Soomo webtext will walk you through this process.
Specifically, the following critical elements must be addressed:
I.
Describe the cultural artifacts that you chose. Consider questions such as these in your response: What is the name or title of the artifact? Who is the
author or artist? What is the date or time period when the artifact was created? What is the cultural location or physical setting of the artifact? In
addition, you could consider including a photograph or image of each cultural artifact, if they are visual artifacts.
II.
Identify at least one common theme that will serve as the framework of your exploration document. How is the theme expressed in your artifacts?
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III.
Explain how the theme you identified is related to your personal experience. For instance, you could discuss how the expression of the theme in your
cultural artifacts is connected to you personally.
IV.
Discuss a profession that could be impacted by the theme you identified. In other words, how is the theme you identified related to professional
experiences? How could a working knowledge of the humanities be useful in this field?
V.
Describe at least three humanities resources that you could use to investigate your theme and artifacts. Your sources must be relevant to your theme
and of an appropriate academic nature. In your description, consider questions such as the following: What are the similarities and differences in the
content of your sources? What makes them appropriate and relevant for investigating your issue? What was your thought process when you were
searching for sources? How did you make choices? Did you encounter any obstacles and, if so, how did you overcome them? If you did not, why do you
think it was so easy to find what you needed?
VI.
Use the humanities resources that you selected to research your theme and cultural artifacts, making sure that you cite your sources. Based on your
research, do the following:
A. Discuss the relationship between each cultural artifact and its historical context. In other words, what were the circumstances under which each
artifact was created?
B. Explain the similarities and differences that you observe in the cultural artifacts you selected, in relation to the theme. For instance, do the
artifacts contain any symbolism? If so, how are the symbols both similar and different? What do the symbols tell you about each artifact?
C. Discuss the medium—such as literature, music, or sculpture—through which your cultural artifacts were created. For instance, how did the
creator or creators of each artifact use the medium to convey something about the meaning of the artifact?
VII.
Based on your research, develop a thesis statement that conveys the claim you plan to make about your theme and artifacts. Your thesis statement
should be clear, specific, and arguable.
VIII.
Based on your research, identify an audience that would be interested in your theme and thesis statement. For example, who would benefit most from
hearing your message?
IX.
Describe how and why you can tailor your message to your audience, providing specific examples based on your research. For example, will your
audience understand the terminology and principles used by humanities scholars, or will you need to explain these? How will you communicate
effectively with your audience?
X.
Provide a reference list that includes all of the humanities resources you used to research your artifacts, theme, and thesis statement. Ensure that your
list is formatted according to current APA guidelines (or another format with instructor permission).
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Project Part One Rubric
Guidelines for Submission: You will upload the polished version of the Word document you downloaded from Soomo to the submission link for instructor
grading and feedback. Please see the feedback provided by your instructor in your SNHU course. Your exploration document should adhere to the following
formatting requirements: 3 to 5 pages in length, double-spaced, using 12-point Times New Roman font and one-inch margins. You should use current APA style
guidelines (or another format approved by your instructor) for your citations and reference list.
Critical Elements
Cultural Artifacts
Common Theme
Personal Experience
Profession
Humanities Resources
Exemplary
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
description is exceptionally
clear and contextualized
(100%)
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
identified theme is especially
well-aligned with artifacts
(100%)
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
explanation demonstrates
keen insight into impact of
humanities on personal
experiences (100%)
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
explanation demonstrates
keen insight into impact of
humanities on professional
experiences (100%)
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
description of resources
demonstrates strong
understanding of information
needed to investigate
expressions of human
creativity (100%)
Proficient
Describes selected cultural
artifacts (85%)
Needs Improvement
Describes selected cultural
artifacts but with gaps in detail
or clarity (55%)
Not Evident
Does not describe selected
cultural artifacts (0%)
Identifies at least one common
theme to serve as framework
of exploration document and
explains how theme is
expressed in artifacts (85%)
Identifies at least one common
theme to serve as framework
of exploration document and
explains how theme is
expressed in artifacts but with
gaps in clarity or detail (55%)
Explains how identified theme
is related to personal
experience but with gaps in
clarity or detail (55%)
Does not identify at least one
common theme to serve as
framework of exploration
document and does not explain
how theme is expressed in
artifacts (0%)
Does not explain how identified
theme is related to personal
experience (0%)
8
Discusses a profession that
could be impacted by identified
theme (85%)
Discusses a profession that
could be impacted by
identified theme but with gaps
in clarity or detail (55%)
Does not discuss a profession
that could be impacted by
identified theme (0%)
8
Describes at least three
relevant and appropriate
humanities resources that
could be used to investigate
theme and artifacts (85%)
Describes at least three
humanities resources that
could be used to investigate
theme and artifacts but with
gaps in appropriateness,
relevance, or detail (55%)
Does not describe humanities
resources that could be used to
investigate theme and artifacts
(0%)
8
Explains how identified theme
is related to personal
experience (85%)
3
Value
8
8
Critical Elements
Research: Historical
Context
Exemplary
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
response demonstrates insight
into essential humanities
principles (100%)
Proficient
Discusses relationship between
each cultural artifact and its
historical context, citing
sources (85%)
Research: Similarities
and Differences
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
response demonstrates insight
into essential humanities
principles (100%)
Explains similarities and
differences observed in cultural
artifacts in relation to theme,
citing sources (85%)
Research: Medium
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
response demonstrates insight
into essential humanities
principles (100%)
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
claim demonstrates insight into
connection between theme
and artifacts (100%)
Discusses the medium through
which the cultural artifacts
were created, citing sources
(85%)
Develops clear, specific, and
arguable thesis statement that
conveys claim about theme
and artifacts, based on
research (85%)
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
identification of audience
demonstrates insight into
theme and thesis statement
(100%)
Meets “Proficient” criteria and
response demonstrates
sophisticated understanding of
how to effectively
communicate with specific
audience (100%)
Identifies an audience that
would be interested in theme
and thesis statement, based on
research (85%)
Needs Improvement
Discusses relationship between
each cultural artifact and its
historical context but with gaps
in detail, clarity, or citation
(55%)
Explains similarities and
differences observed in
cultural artifacts but not in
relation to theme or with gaps
in detail, clarity, or citation
(55%)
Discusses the medium through
which cultural artifacts were
created but with gaps in detail,
clarity, or citation (55%)
Develops thesis statement that
conveys claim about theme
and artifacts but thesis
statement is not based on
research, lacks clarity or
specificity, or is not arguable
(55%)
Identifies an audience but
audience is not appropriate for
theme and thesis statement or
is not based on research (55%)
Describes how and why
message can be tailored to
audience, providing specific
examples based on research
(85%)
Describes how and why
message can be tailored to
audience but with gaps in
examples or research support
(55%)
Thesis Statement
Audience
Message
4
Not Evident
Does not discuss relationship
between each cultural artifact
and its historical context (0%)
Value
8
Does not explain similarities and
differences observed in cultural
artifacts (0%)
8
Does not discuss the medium
through which the cultural
artifacts were created (0%)
8
Does not develop thesis
statement that conveys claim
about theme and artifacts (0%)
8
Does not identify an audience
(0%)
8
Does not describe how and why
message can be tailored to
audience (0%)
8
Critical Elements
Reference List
Exemplary
Articulation of
Response
Submission is free of errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, and
organization and is presented
in a professional and easy-toread format (100%)
Proficient
Provides reference list that
includes all humanities
resources used to research
artifacts, theme, and thesis
statement, ensuring that list is
formatted according to current
APA guidelines (100%)
Submission has no major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization
(85%)
Needs Improvement
Provides reference list that
includes all humanities
resources used to research
artifacts, theme, and thesis
statement, but list has gaps in
adherence to current APA
formatting guidelines (55%)
Submission has major errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or
organization that negatively
impact readability and
articulation of main ideas
(55%)
Not Evident
Does not provide reference list
that includes all humanities
resources used to research
artifacts, theme, and thesis
statement (0%)
Value
8
Submission has critical errors
related to citations, grammar,
spelling, syntax, or organization
that prevent understanding of
ideas (0%)
4
Total
5
100%
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Southern New Hampshire University
Loretta Johns
HUM-200-R6260 Applied Humanities 22EW6
July 20, 2022
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Hum 200 Project Part One Rough Draft
Cultural artifacts
Washington Crossing Delaware. Created in 1851 by Emanuel Leutze. The location of this
artifact is The Delaware River, the area where the soldiers entered is less than 300 yards wide
(Manfredi, 2021). Notwithstanding how the Delaware River is frequently shown in art, the
location where General Washington and his soldiers traversed the river was somewhat
constrained. There were flat ships and Durham boats for crossing.
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JFK’s Handwritten Inaugural Address. Created on 20th January 1961. The venue was in the U.s.
The Joint Congressional Hearing coordinated Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., and it on
Inauguration ceremony Ceremonies
Historical context.
Leutze and Kennedy’s paintings are about independence. Robbins says Leutze designed
the footbridge to inspire European rebels by highlighting American sovereignty. The painter
“hoped American Independence would inspire European rebels” (Boianovsky, 2018). The
painting depicted General Washington’s attempts to defend our country’s sovereignty and inspire
Europeans. Kennedy’s speech was a declaration on contemporary topics.
Kennedy “appealed to American men to support their nation and the world and to
struggle for democratic” (White, 2018), keeping the speech’s theme of freedom. “Ask not what
America does for you, but what we can do for man’s sovereignty,” Wolfarth said in 1961.
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Comparing the two illustrates that independence isn’t silent. Kennedy says that, like General
Washington, others shouldn’t rely on others to protect American liberty. Both were established
when independence was threatening, and their concepts are similar.
Similarities and differences
Both items symbolize patriotism and freedom. Leutze’s artwork conveys this visually
(metmuseum.org, n.d.), whereas Kennedy’s article does so literarily (National Archives, n.d.).
Even if the mediums are different, the concept is similar. Each presents the concept differently.
“Washington Crossing the Delaware” addresses a single historical event. Kennedy’s inauguration
speech mentions the cold war, totalitarianism, racism, and the worldwide cry for independence
(Harnish, 2019). “We dare not forget now that we are the heirs of that first movement,” Kennedy
declared (Harnish, 2019). Kennedy leverages the American revolutionary to communicate his
message.
Medium
General Washington bridging Delaware was shown by Leutze in oil painting, and it is an
enormous twelve feet five inches in height and twenty-one hands and feet three inches long.
Using heavier or lighter layers of pigment to achieve the intended effect, oil paints provide the
artist a great deal of flexibility when producing textured effects. When we look closely at
Leutze’s picture, we can see areas of juxtaposition, such as the sizable sheets of ice in the
riverbed compared to the generally drab appearance of the storm clouds. Kennedy used a short
pen and paper medium, and the crossed-out portions of sentences suggested that this was a draft
version. The format would have been broadly acknowledged because a second, third, or final
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draft should have been written on a typewriter. The artifacts examine the handwritten version
rather than the final draft, which would have been expertly transcribed and edited for faults.
Thesis Statement
Two renowned American historical items may not seem related. First, a painting by
German-American artist Emanuel Leutze from 1851 portrays Washington bridging the Delaware
River on December Day in 1776. The legendary crossing occurred during the American rebellion
when the U.S. was battling for sovereignty from Britain. Washington and his troops embarked on
a small boat from Philadelphia to confront the British in Trenton, New Jersey. The other relic is
John F. Kennedy’s written announcement speech, in which he urged Americans to struggle for
freedom in 1961. Ask not what your government can do for you but what you’re doing for your
community (Harnish, 2019). Investigating and investigating both objects can assist build their
common topic. The two objects have a theme of achieving freedom since each shows a concrete
action or the ambition to build a concrete action to safeguard American freedoms.
Audience
Students majoring in political sciences or American histories are the core demographic
for this seminar. Both of the chosen artifacts are representations of American history that may be
used to explore their development further, the intentional impact on a readership, and the
platform on which they have been produced. They both link to the courses that were chosen
because of this. Because it specifically addresses how a subject is generated in the literature
research and connects to times of American history, the readers would discover that the
dissertation comment at the end of the introduction can apply to their studies. The secondary
demographic for this lecture could be recognized as history instructors. The project might reveal
a relationship between the two relics that a researcher knowledgeable about the creative artwork
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had never noticed before. This would help the lecturer adapt their lessons to a larger and more
varied audience.
Message
The overarching idea will be personalized to my target using direct quotes from recent
research publications on each of the artifacts. Utilizing current and relevant materials would
improve the statement’s efficiency by retaining a close connection to the original study. For
instance, “Visions of a New Era” by Wolfarth dissects Kennedy’s inaugural address while
offering the advantage of upgrading the understanding to omit vocabulary that would be
regarded as archaic in today’s modern talks. Defined, the statement becomes current when
something has been said in a way that was not appropriate in the 1960s. Since the terms are
frequently used and comprehended in scholarly writing and the intellectuals, in particular, should
be comprehended in the presentation’s theme. The general message is expressed in a simple,
clear, and concise way. Thus the terminology shouldn’t need to be repeated. The key to
adequately communicating the assignment’s aim will be keeping things simple.
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References
Boianovsky, M. (2018). 2017 HES Presidential Address: Economists and their travels, or the time
when JFK sent Douglass North on a mission to Brazil. Journal of the History of Economic
Thought, 40(2), 149-177.
Harnish, K. B. (2019). Painting Ephemera in the Age of Mass Production: American Trompe l’Oeil
Painting and Visual Culture in the Late Nineteenth Century. Washington University in St.
Louis.
Manfredi, M. (2021). Washington Rallying the Troops at Monmouth (1857): A Window into
Nineteenth-Century Domestic Domains. The Coalition of Master’s Scholars on Material
Culture, June 11, 2.
White, J. K. (2018). Still Seeing Red: How the Cold War Shapes the New American Politics
Updated and Expanded. Routledge.
Wolfarth, D. L. (1961). John F. Kennedy in the tradition of inaugural speeches. Quarterly Journal
of Speech, 47(2), 124-132.

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