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You have completed several options of your adjacency matrix, bubble, block and schematic plans in week 3.

Now, revisit them and consider the following items based on feedback and readings in week 4:

Depending on selected entrance locations – where should your primary, secondary, public and service areas will be located?

Review your client and the hierarchy of internal operations. Associate this with the building staff and overall users of the space – consider if you need to assign an exclusive use, a supervised use, open access, limited access, etc.

Avoid placing functional rooms or areas that may not be safe or too visible to the public. Think of active shooting – ex: if integrating a children reading area / facility – make sure to have security measures.

Check your selected companies – some of you are totally lost in what you are doing in terms of branding or mission. Review your case studies (replace if ideas are too big). You are designing a publication office – so stay on point with requirements. Your building codes (safety, walls, doors, etc) will be affected by changes of entrance, vertical addition, interior space distribution, etc.

Note: If a small child minding area or daycare is allocated – it is for the employees’ children – not strangers.

Read the two PowerPoints in week 3 – Data collection for commercial spaces and Office spaces 11a and 12a. Review the Commercial Interior Spaces.pdf. This will give additional information on how behavior of staff, allocated space for each function: executive directors, regional supervisors, unit heads (accounting, marketing, operations, social work, etc), unit engineers, lawyers, publicists, editors, clerical staff, personal assistants, gallery sitter, receptionists, etc. with reference to your company’s hierarchy.

Review the hierarchy of operations and define their functions in your developing project proposal.

In developing the initial schematic plans for specific room layouts, it is important to have accurate square footage for each space, understanding flow of operations, door locations, primary and secondary hallways, etc. You will get this information from the readings and visuals in week 4. Use the textbook as reference.

In this task, using typical furniture sizes and dimensional relationships will help you generate prototypical furniture layouts and then test these layouts in the schematic plans. You may find it necessary to adjust some of the planning that you have already accomplished.

Step-by-Step Instructions:

If your diagrams are acceptable on dialogues – you can proceed with planning all levels.

Generate an organizational hierarchy. Clarify the logical operational flow. Present in visual form the hierarchy of management and staff.

Update the concept statement with better allusion to the goals and objectives you are supporting. Add your keywords. Use keywords to choose images of inspiration.

With reference to your final option or a mixture of your options 1 and 2; generate only one final schematic plan. Brainstorm with your learning buddy and choose the best ideas from all of your previous schematic plans. One final schematic plan is expected.

Make sure that you update your bubble and block diagrams with this final plan. Do not delete your old diagrams as you will submit them as process drawings in week 11.

With the chosen plan, generate prototypical furniture layouts for the closed office, conference room, ADA restroom, an open office (4-6 workstations to initially map your overall plan strategy, one collaborative enclosure. Include dimensions and square footage of the space. Refer back to week 2 for specific rooms and other rooms you have added in week 3.

Follow through with your overall conceptual focus – ex. plan for the break room/staff lounge; reception area; and all other spaces of your choice (with reference to your criteria matrix). You are free to expand your ideas. Ex; printing lab, audio lab recording, editors office, etc.

Start thinking if this prototypical furniture layouts can be applied to other areas. Support your plans with 1-2 images that you intend to draw inspiration from.

See sample image of schematic plan.

Diversify the prototypical furniture layouts as you review each level – so that each sheet will not be so crowded.

Start selecting materials that fits your concept statement and design style (commercial grade materials, light colored wood, metal and glass, retro modern furniture, etc..

Unit Head Office
Conference Room
Options 1 and 2
Shared Office Plan Options 1 and 2
Project and
Client
Information
By: Merna Khalil and Elizabeth
Hernandez
INTA242 Commercial Design 1
Week 2 Assignment 2
About Thames and Hudson Australia
Thames & Hudson Australia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the land on which we work.
We recognize the continuing connection to culture and story passed down through
generations of Indigenous Australians that unite people, environment and ways of
seeing, and we pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.
Thames & Hudson was founded in 1949 by Walter and Eva Neurath. Their passion
and mission were to create a ‘museum without walls’ and to make the world of art
and the research of top scholars accessible to a large reading public. To reflect its
international outlook, the name for the company linked the rivers flowing through
London and New York. The two dolphins in the company’s logo symbolize friendship
and intelligence, one facing east, one west, suggesting a connection between the old
world and the new.
Thames & Hudson Australia was established in Melbourne in 1970, to represent the
Thames & Hudson list in Australia & New Zealand and to make the books produced
in London more accessible to a local readership. Quickly establishing itself as one of
the region’s leading publishers of illustrated visual arts books, the Australian
company has grown to expand its local publishing program of books by Australian
and New Zealand authors for a domestic and international market.
In addition to its publishing activities, Thames & Hudson Australia is Australia’s
leading distributor of illustrated books produced by a growing number of independent
illustrated book publishers from around the world. Some of these brands include
Abrams, TASCHEN, Tate Publishing, Flammarion and over 30 others.
Named 2018 ABIA Small Publisher of the Year, Thames & Hudson Australia
publishes nearly 30 original Australian titles each year into subject areas including
art, the arts, architecture, interiors, design, photography, gardening, food and drink
and children’s books. As a distributor, Thames & Hudson Australia brings
approximately 2000 new books to Australia and New Zealand each year while
stocking over 7000 titles in an active backlist.
Internationally, still an independent, family-owned company, Thames & Hudson is
one of the world’s leading publishers of illustrated books, with their head office in
London and a sister company in New York. Thames & Hudson’s Australian
headquarters are based in Melbourne. In addition, Thames and Hudson has a new
Asian operation in Hong Kong and a distribution business in Paris, where a
subsidiary company, Interact, distributes English-language books in France.
Thames & Hudson: Inspiring, Innovative, International, Independent.
More about Themes
and Hudson
Thames & Hudson (often abbreviated T&H) publishes works in all of these fields: Publisher of illustrated
books in all visually creative fields, including the performing arts, fashion, cinema, and photography.
Additionally, it produces books on history, pop culture, and archaeology.
Its corporate headquarters are in London, while its subsidiaries are in Melbourne, Singapore, and Hong
Kong. It also has a sister firm in New York City. Éditions Thames & Hudson, a sister firm in Paris, and Interart,
a subsidiary, both distribute English-language publications. Currently, the Thames & Hudson group employs
about 150 people in London and another 65 people globally.
Walter and Eva Neurath started the publishing business in 1949 with the intention of opening up the world
of art and the work of leading academics to a larger audience. The name of the business symbolizes its
global reach, especially in London and New York. With over 2,000 volumes in print, it is one of the biggest
publishers of illustrated books and is still an independent, family-owned business.
History
Walter Neurath, who managed an art gallery and produced illustrated books in Vienna, was born there in
1903. He departed for London in 1938, where he originally served as the production director of Adprint, a
book-packaging business started by another emigrant from Vienna, Wolfgang Foges. While working for
Adprint, Neurath created the hardcover King Penguin Books and the Britain in Pictures book series, which
included text and photographs rather than dividing them into “plates” sections.
In its first year of publication in 1950, Thames & Hudson released 10 books, among them Albert Einstein’s
Out of My Later Years and English Cathedrals with images by Martin Hürlimann.
Five years later, in 1955, there were 144 volumes published annually, up from ten in 1950. When Thames &
Hudson outgrew its High Holborn premises, it relocated in 1956 to 30 Bloomsbury Street, a short distance
from Bedford Square, which was at the time London’s center for book publishing.
Other notable series include the large-format Great Civilizations series, released starting in 1961, containing
contributions by Alan Bullock, Asa Briggs, Hugh Trevor-Roper, A. J. P. Taylor, John Julius Norwich, and others,
edited by archaeologist Glyn Daniel and featuring over 100 titles in all.
When Walter Neurath passed away in 1967 at the age of 63, Eva Neurath took over as company chairman.
Thomas, Walter’s son, who had joined the business in 1961 along with his sister Constance, who
subsequently worked for many years as the company’s art director, rose to the position of managing
director. The company’s board of directors includes Thomas’s daughters Johanna and Susanna as well as
him and Constance.
BUILDING LOCATION
– Airport
– Building location
– Public transport
CLIENT AND GOALS
The goal for this building is to capture the client’s needs and provide a better use of the space for their business.
The vision for this space is a place where they feel like home where they can gather and make innovation things.
This building will reflect the beauty of art and will have the following spaces:
❑ Secured entry foyer leading to the main lobby
❑ Main lobby for 10-12 people
❑ Gallery / Media Room for special guests
❑ Executive offices
❑ Regular offices
❑ Shared enclosed spaces for 6-8 people
❑ Collaborative space for 8-10 people
❑ Creative Room
❑ Photography Room
❑ Media production Room
❑ Conference Room for 12-14 people
❑ Break Room
❑ ADA Restrooms
❑ Storage Room
❑ Archive Room
Inspiration Images
Case Study 1: Perkins and Will Company
•
Design Goal: There’s so much more to architecture than what meets the
eye. Every place has a story, and as we design, we help tell it. The work
enlivens neighborhoods, builds communities, energizes the citizenry, and
respects and protects the planet. Living design-designing for life
•
Location: Chicago Illinois
•
Interior Architecture Firm: Perkins & Will
•
Sq. Ft.: 26,000-square-foot building
•
Number of Employees: It has 2600 employees
•
Workspace Styles: At Perkins & Will, they have begun exploring what their
own re-entry into the workplace will look like and what modifications will
be required. Their studio in Toronto moved into a new collaborative space
in the heart of downtown in October 2018. They designed their studio by
utilizing a free address strategy coupled with varied areas for
collaboration and community. The design optimized their footprint,
embracing a more densified layout, while providing their employees with
the ability to choose where to work, to be curious, experiment and learn.
•
Meeting Space Styles: There are three schematic diagrams in the project,
Pop-Up Meeting Space, Fluid Work Experience and Small Group Teaming.
Areas are designed with details like privacy curtains that can open and
close off certain zone, furniture on wheels and screens for Zoom calls so
they can be easily adapted to different uses. Pop-up Meeting Space has a
series of small rooms for meetings, while Small Group Teaming comprises
curvilinear screens that wrap around desks to encourage “balanced
meeting and focus”.
•
Biggest Impact in the space: kitchen, espresso bar, food, two-part pop up
meeting space.
•
Unique Features: include doorless, airport-style washrooms with
individual stalls and anti-splash sinks. Sensor-activated Conference
phones and elevators.
Case Study 2: AECOM Company
•
Design Goal: Bring together the best people, ideas and technical expertise
and partner with clients to turn their ambitions into action. A world
where infrastructure creates opportunity for everyone – uplifting
communities, improving access and sustaining our planet.
•
Location: Los Angeles 300 South Grand Suite 900, CA 90071United States
•
Interior Architecture Firm: AECOM Designs
•
Sq. Ft.: 123, 700
•
Number of Employees: It has 51,000 employees
•
Workspace Styles: At AECOM, they are starting to consider how they will
return to the workforce and what adjustments will be necessary. They
used a free address method while designing their headquarters, along
with a variety of spaces for community interaction and collaboration. By
adopting a denser layout, the design minimized their environmental
impact while giving their staff more freedom to be creative, try new
things, and learn.
•
Meeting Space Styles: Three schematic diagrams—Pop-Up Meeting Space,
Fluid Work Experience, and Small Group Teaming—are included in the
design. It is easy to convert spaces to varied applications due to elements
like privacy curtains that can open and block off certain zones, furniture
on wheels, and screens for Zoom conversations. Tiny Group Teaming uses
curved displays that wrap around workstations to promote “balanced
meetings and attention” whereas Pop-up Meeting Space includes a
number of small meeting spaces.
•
Biggest Impact in the space: kitchen, warehouses outside, coffee bar,
food, two-part pop up meeting space, three schematic diagrams
•
Unique Features: Two glass volumes that sheer along the north/south axis
of the structure combine to produce a 10-meter cantilever that serves as
the building’s primary entrance. Moreover, include door less restrooms
with separate stalls and splash-proof sinks, similar to those seen in
airport. And elevators and conference phones with sensors.
Bubble Diagram
Office
Office
Media
Production
Room
Break
Room
Photography
Room
Gallery/Media
Room
Admin
Office
Accounting
Creative
Room
Conference
Room
Executive Office
Marketing
Storage Room
ADA Restroom
Main Lobby
Entry
Foyer
Block Diagram
Media
Production
Room
Office
Break Room
Office
Gallery/Media
Room
Photography
Room
Admin
Office
Accounting
Creative
Room
Conference
Room
Executive Office
Marketing
Storage Room
ADA Restroom
Main
Lobby
Entry
Foyer
References
• About Us. Thames & Hudson Australia & New Zealand. (n.d.). Retrieved July 20, 2022, from
https://thamesandhudson.com.au/about/ Wikimedia Foundation. (2022, July 3). Thames & Hudson. Wikipedia.
Retrieved July 20, 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thames_%26_Hudson
• Bookshop and Cafeteria Furniture in MAXXI from Lapalma (archdaily.com)
• https://aecom.com/
• https://perkinswill.com/
• YUE Art Gallery / BLACKhome | ArchDaily
BUILDING
DESIGN AND
INFORMATION
INDEX
By: Merna Khalil and Elizabeth
Hernandez
INTA242 Commercial Design 1
Week 3 Assignment 1
Programming Index
Room Name
# Of Space
SF
Description
Secured Entry
1
Foyer leading to the main lobby
Main Lobby
1
Space for 10 to 12 people
Gallery/ Media Room
1
For special guests
Executive Offices
4
Regular Offices
6-8
Marketing, account, design
offices
1
Space for 6 to 8 people
(workstations)
Collaborative space
1
Space for 8 to 10 people (open area
with the option to close)
Creative Room
1
For illustrators, copywriters, web
designers
Photography Room
1
Media Production Room
1
For audio, film and print
Conference Room
1
Space for 12 to 14 people
Breakroom
1
Kitchenette, wellness, lockers
ADA Restrooms
2
For male and female
Storage Room
1
Archive Room
1
Bubble Diagram 1
Regular
offices
Break
Room
Restroom
Media
Production
Room
Photography
Room
Gallery/Media
Room
Archive
Room
Creative
Room
Collaborative
offices
Conference
Room
Executive
Office
Marketing
Accounts
Design
Storage Room
ADA Restroom
Main Lobby
Entry
Foyer
Bubble Diagram 2
Creative
Room
Photography
Room
Marketing
Accounts
Design
Break
Room
Archive
Room
Storage Room
Media
Production
Room
Gallery/Media
Room
Collaborative
offices
ADA Restroom
Main Lobby
Entry
Foyer
Executive
Office
Conference
Room
Regular
offices
Restroom
Block Diagram 1
Regular
Offices
Break Room
Photography
Room
ARCHIVE
ROOM
RESTROOM
Gallery/Media
Room
ADA Restroom
Conference
Room
Executive
Office
Creative
Room
Main
Lobby
Storage Room
Entry
Foyer
Media
Production
Room
Collaborative
offices
Marketing
Accounts
Design
Block Diagram 2
Gallery/Media
Room
Creative
Room
ADA Restroom
Main
Lobby
Entry
Foyer
Photography
Room
Collaborative
offices
Marketing
Accounts
Design
Conference
Room
Break Room
Storage Room
Executive
Office
Archive
Room
Media
Production
Room
Regular
Offices
RESTROOM
Case Study 1: Perkins and Will
Company
•
Design Goal: There’s so much more to architecture than what meets the eye.
Every place has a story, and as we design, we help tell it. The work enlivens
neighborhoods, builds communities, energizes the citizenry, and respects and
protects the planet. Living design-designing for life
•
Location: Chicago Illinois
•
Interior Architecture Firm: Perkins & Will
•
Sq. Ft.: 26,000-square-foot building
•
Number of Employees: It has 2600 employees
•
Workspace Styles: At Perkins & Will, they have begun exploring what their
own re-entry into the workplace will look like and what modifications will be
required. Their studio in Toronto moved into a new collaborative space in the
heart of downtown in October 2018. They designed their studio by utilizing a
free address strategy coupled with varied areas for collaboration and
community. The design optimized their footprint, embracing a more densified
layout, while providing their employees with the ability to choose where to
work, to be curious, experiment and learn.
•
Meeting Space Styles: There are three schematic diagrams in the project, PopUp Meeting Space, Fluid Work Experience and Small Group Teaming. Areas
are designed with details like privacy curtains that can open and close off
certain zone, furniture on wheels and screens for Zoom calls so they can be
easily adapted to different uses. Pop-up Meeting Space has a series of small
rooms for meetings, while Small Group Teaming comprises curvilinear screens
that wrap around desks to encourage “balanced meeting and focus”.
•
Biggest Impact in the space: kitchen, espresso bar, food, two-part pop up
meeting space.
•
Unique Features: include doorless, airport-style washrooms with individual
stalls and anti-splash sinks. Sensor-activated Conference phones and
elevators.
Case Study 2: AECOM Company
•
Design Goal: Bring together the best people, ideas and technical expertise and
partner with clients to turn their ambitions into action. A world where
infrastructure creates opportunity for everyone – uplifting communities,
improving access and sustaining our planet.
•
Location: Los Angeles 300 South Grand Suite 900, CA 90071United States
•
Interior Architecture Firm: AECOM Designs
•
Sq. Ft.: 123, 700
•
Number of Employees: It has 51,000 employees
•
Workspace Styles: At AECOM, they are starting to consider how they will
return to the workforce and what adjustments will be necessary. They used a
free address method while designing their headquarters, along with a variety
of spaces for community interaction and collaboration. By adopting a denser
layout, the design minimized their environmental impact while giving their
staff more freedom to be creative, try new things, and learn.
•
Meeting Space Styles: Three schematic diagrams—Pop-Up Meeting Space,
Fluid Work Experience, and Small Group Teaming—are included in the design.
It is easy to convert spaces to varied applications due to elements like privacy
curtains that can open and block off certain zones, furniture on wheels, and
screens for Zoom conversations. Tiny Group Teaming uses curved displays
that wrap around workstations to promote “balanced meetings and attention”
whereas Pop-up Meeting Space includes a number of small meeting spaces.
•
Biggest Impact in the space: kitchen, warehouses outside, coffee bar, food,
two-part pop up meeting space, three schematic diagrams
•
Unique Features: Two glass volumes that sheer along the north/south axis of
the structure combine to produce a 10-meter cantilever that serves as the
building’s primary entrance. Moreover, include door less restrooms with
separate stalls and splash-proof sinks, similar to those seen in airport.
And elevators and conference phones with sensors.
References
• About Us. Thames & Hudson Australia & New Zealand. (n.d.). Retrieved July 20, 2022, from
https://thamesandhudson.com.au/about/ Wikimedia Foundation. (2022, July 3). Thames & Hudson. Wikipedia.
Retrieved July 20, 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thames_%26_Hudson
• Bookshop and Cafeteria Furniture in MAXXI from Lapalma (archdaily.com)
• https://aecom.com/
• https://perkinswill.com/
• YUE Art Gallery / BLACKhome | ArchDaily
STUDIO SAMPLES
INTA 242
INTA 342
INTA 352
ADJACENCY AND CRITERIA MATRIX
PROGRAMMING INDEX STUDY
CASE STUDY SAMPLE
FACADE VERSIONS

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