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dissertation titled Analysis and Research on Multinational Operation and Management Strategies of International Companies

Ethics Application Form for SECONDARY DATA ANALYSIS
Version September 2019
Please consult the guidance at the end of this form before completing and submitting your
application.
6.
Title of your research project / study:
Analysis and Research on Multinational Operation and Management Strategies of International
Companies
7.
Briefly describe the rationale, aims, design and research questions of your research
Please indicate clearly whether you are applying for ethics approval for a specific piece of
research, or for overarching ethics approval to use certain datasets for a range of research
activities. Approval for the latter will only cover the datasets specified here, for a maximum
of 3 years and then subject to renewal.
My research will focus on how multinational corporations achieve multinational and cross-cultural
management, and the various strategies that may be employed because different strategies and management
methods can seriously affect the positioning and benefits of a multinational company. I will gather information
on the strategy and management of multiple multinational companies, and examine how they impact the
company and the market, and why they succeed or fail.
8.
Describe the data you wish to analyse
Please give details of the title of the dataset, nature of data subjects (e.g. individuals or
organisations), thematic focus and country/countries covered. Indicate whether the data
are qualitative or quantitative, survey data, administrative data or other types of data.
Identify the source from where you will be obtaining the data (including a web address
where appropriate).
I will collect the management strategies and financial data of different MNCs and study how
different management strategies will affect MNCs. The data will include both quantitative and qualitative. I will
collect data from the Bloomberg site.
9.
What are the terms and conditions around the use of the data? Did data subjects give
consent for their data to be re-used? If not, on what basis is re-use of the data
justified?
Please state what (if any) conditions the data archive imposes (e.g. registration, signing of
confidentiality agreement, specific training etc.). In many cases the data controller will have
given explicit permission for data re-use. Please explain how you justify the use of data if
approval and consents for the original data collection and re-use are not in place. This may
be the case where, for example, the original data collection predated requirements for
ethics review or occurred in a jurisdiction where explicit consent and approval are not
required.
The data I am about to collect is publicly available online and used with permission.
10.
Do you intend to process personal data (https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-todata-protection/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/key-definitions/whatis-personal-data) that are sensitive (‘special category’) personal data as defined by the
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the Data Protection Act 2018 following the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
(https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/guide-to-the-general-dataprotection-regulation-gdpr/lawful-basis-for-processing/special-category-data/), or data
relating to a person’s criminal convictions, even if such data are publicly available
and/or have been pseudonymised (https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-dataprotection/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/what-is-personaldata/what-is-personal-data/)?
Yes
No
√
If YES, please specify what personal data will be processed and why.
11.
Do you intend to link two or more datasets?
Data linkage refers to merging of information from two or more sources of data to
consolidate facts concerning an individual or an event that are not available in any
separate record. Please note that for the purposes of research ethics we are not interested
in the merging of different waves of a particular survey, or the merging of data from
different countries for the same survey.
Yes
No
√
If YES, please give details of which datasets will be linked and for what purposes.
12.
How will you store and manage the data before and during the analysis? What will
happen with the data at the end of the project?
Please consult the University of Southampton’s Research Data Management Policy
(http://library.soton.ac.uk/researchdata/storage and
http://www.calendar.soton.ac.uk/sectionIV/research-data-management.html), and indicate
how you will abide by it.
I would have access to the collected data alone, and store in Network Home Directories.
I’ll delete them when I’m done researching them.
13.
How will you minimise the risk that data subjects (individuals or organisations) could
be identified in your presentation of results?
Please consider whether disclosive ID codes have been used (e.g. date of birth) and whether
it is theoretically possible to identify individuals by combining characteristics (e.g. widow in
Hampshire with 14 children) or by combining datasets. How will you protect individuals’
anonymity in your analysis and dissemination?
I will not show any individual or organizational ID codes.
14.
What other ethical risks are raised by your research, and how do you intend to
manage these?
Issues may arise due to the nature of the research you intend to undertake and/or the
subject matter of the data. Examples include: data or analysis that are culturally or socially
sensitive; data relating to criminal activity, including terrorism, and security sensitive
issues.
My research will not raise other ethical risks.
15.
Please outline any other information that you feel may be relevant to this submission.
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For example, will you be using the services or facilities of ONS, ADRN, or HSCIC and/or are
you obtaining ethical review from NRES (through IRAS) or other? Please confirm whether
the data being used are already in the public domain.
My data that will being used are already in the public domain.
16.
Please indicate if you, your supervisor or a member of the study team/research group
(including any institution that they act for, if different from the University) are a data
controller and/or data processor in relation to the personal data you intend to process
as defined by the Data Protection Act 2018 following the GDPR, and confirm that
you/they understand your/their respective responsibilities ( https://ico.org.uk/fororganisations/guide-to-data-protection/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulationgdpr/key-definitions/controllers-and-processors//)
Nobody is a data controller and/or data processor in relation to the personal data I
intend to process, I also do not intend to collect personal data.
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Guidance on applying for ethics approval for secondary data analysis
If your research PURELY involves the following, you do not need to apply for ethics
approval:
•
•
•
analysis of aggregated data on individuals or organisations (e.g. GDP, labour force
participation rates, fertility rates);
meta-analyses (i.e. the analysis of studies);
literature reviews or reviews/analyses of reports, policies, documents, meeting
minutes, newspaper articles, films.
Filling in the online submission form on ERGO II:
•
•
Please give your application a title that includes ‘SDA’ (Secondary Data Analysis).
Please refer to the “ERGO II Guidance for Applicants” document (downloadable
from the ERGO II site) on how to answer the submission questionnaire correctly..
Additional Forms:
If your study PURELY involves secondary analysis of data, you only need to fill in the
‘Ethics Application Form for Secondary Data Analysis’. You do not need a Risk Assessment
Form.
If your study is a mixed-method study involving secondary data analysis AND some
component of data collection (e.g. interviews, online survey), then you need to fill in
additional forms:
•
•
•
•
•
Ethics Application Form (for studies other than secondary data analysis)
Risk Assessment Form
Participant Information Sheet
Consent Form
Draft research instrument
Please note:
•
•
•
You must not begin data analysis until ethical approval has been obtained.
It is your responsibility to follow the University of Southampton’s Ethics Policy and
any relevant academic or professional guidelines in the conduct of your research.
This includes ensuring confidentiality in the storage and use of data.
It is your responsibility to provide full and accurate information in completing this
form.
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What is a dissertation?
• An extended, independent investigation of a topic that you have chosen relevant to your
programme of study
• the preparation of a 15,000 word dissertation describing their work
• Usually divided into chapters. (in which a problem, hypothesis or question of importance to the
author is subjected to analysis and illumination by an explicit method or methods)
• Contains a detailed exploration of evidence from data collection (interviews, surveys).
• Conclusions are drawn about the problem and also perhaps about methods chosen and the
contextual value of the findings
• Has to be presented in a professionally finished manner
1
What is a dissertation?
You are expected to:
• Draw attention to a novel research topic – define a gap through a critical
examination of the existing academic literature
• Develop an analytical framework (theory) based on the academic literature
• Collect empirical data (normally primary data) for analysis – to test or develop
theory
• Relate your specific findings (by linking data to theory) to more general
theoretical concerns
• Drawing conclusions through reasoned argument
2
The research process
1.Select topic

2. Develop initial research objective(s) and research question(s) /hypothesis

3. Review the literature

4. Develop theoretical and conceptual frameworks

5. Clarify research question(s)/hypothesis(es)

6. Research design (Methodology)

7. Data collection

8. Data analysis

9. Discuss implications

3
Structure of a dissertation
Thanking note… (Names and what help they have provided)
1. Introduction
2. Literature review
3. Methodology
4. Findings/Results and analysis
5. Discussion of findings
6. Conclusion
Reference list
Reflective statement
Appendix (if any)
4
Dissertation structure (1)
Introduction
•
The background to your research topic – what the topic is about? Why is it important? Provide
some background information or statistics
Literature review
•
Why you are studying it? – Why have you chosen to study this topic?
•
Objectives of your research (Approximately 3) (Examples: to understand, to explain, to..)
•
Outline your research method/approach
•
Outline the argument your dissertation is going to follow
•
Discusses who has already studied this topic and related aspects (History/mention earlier
research)
•
Explains which and how previous research is relevant to your topic, which are not (and why), and
any limitations (analyse your research with earlier research)
•
Finding and explaining connections between literature and how knowledge of your topic is
structured
Methodology
•
Describe the research method that you use
•
Pros and cons of your research method
•
Explain what questions you ask and why – for example, interview/survey
•
Explain who was involved, how and why they were selected (i.e. your sampling)
5
Dissertation structure (2)
Results & analysis
• Present and analyse results
• Comment critically on the quality of responses and the reliability and
limitations of the findings
Discussion of implications
• Relate your findings back to the literature review
• Discuss similarities and differences
• Explain the implications of your findings for managers and decision makers
Conclusion
• Summarise key points in the dissertation
• Include a ‘so what?’ section which discusses the implications of the
dissertation for a given organisation context, or organisations in general or
concept/theory/technique development.
• Explain limitations of the scope, quality, and validity of the analysis undertaken
• Suggestions for further research — these will usually emerge from the
limitations which you have identified
• Reflect on any challenges you have encountered in designing and carrying out
your research what you have learnt (Reflective statement)
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What do they mean
< 49 – Purpose & Objective 50-69 70 + Purpose & Objective Inappropriate study Poorly defined rationale Too big Too small No relevance Realistic research Relevance & justification Straightforward Clearly articulated rationale Interesting Original Innovative • This is about your focus – to what extent were you able to find an appropriate research question/objective • How realistic is your research? • Have you justified why it is important and/or interesting to look at this topic? 7 What do they mean < 49 – Literature 50-69 70 + Literature Not sufficient coverage of topic area No clear structure/purpose Unsystematic Not critical or analytical Doesn’t add to my understanding of topic Adequate coverage of topic area Some structure Helps to frame the research problem Extensive & inclusive Clear about why literature is included Enlightens the reader about the subject area Critical engagement ❑ Important chapter to demonstrate understanding of subject area • Have you selected the appropriate bodies of literature? – Tell us why they are appropriate! • Have you brought those literatures together in a coherent way? ❑ To what extent have you analysed and critically reviewed the literature ❑ Your literature review is the basis for understanding your research problem 8 What do they mean < 49 – Research Methodology 50-69 70 + Research Methodology No explanation of approach No theoretical base No evaluation of approach Evaluation of approach Clarity of why approach was chosen Theoretical foundations are apparent Clear theoretical base and justification Clarity and evaluation of approach • Focus on how you have conducted your research • Clarity of why approach (paradigm) was most suitable compared to alternative approaches • Needs to have a theoretical component (Saunders!!!!!) • Think of it as the description of a recipe BUT needs to be more than descriptive step-by-step guide to what you have done • Learn/Know the Method in detail which you are going to use 9 What do they mean < 49 – Primary Research 50-69 70 + Primary Research Irrelevant data Casual collection of data Poor or no analysis Standard approach Appropriate validity/reliability Acceptable analysis Complex & creative approaches to data collection Rigorous – both collection & analysis Advanced analysis techniques • How did you get your data and what did you do with it once you had it! • Rigorous processes are important here • How did you construct your data collection tool? • How did you administer data collection? • Have you used appropriate analyses (techniques and processes) • Validity and reliability 10 What do they mean < 49 – Secondary Research 50-69 70 + Secondary Research Irrelevant data Casual collection of data Inclusion/Exclusion criteria Poor or no analysis Standard approach Appropriate validity/reliability Acceptable analysis Complex & creative approaches to data collection Rigorous – both collection & analysis Advanced analysis techniques • How did you get your data and what did you do with it once you had it! • Rigorous processes are important here • How did you construct your data collection tool? • How did you administer data collection? • Have you used appropriate analyses (techniques and processes) • Inclusion and exclusion criteria 11 What do they mean < 49 – Discussion 50-69 70 + Discussion No relation to theory Links with theory apparent but not clear Clear link to theory & how research adds • Your opportunity to answer your question – explicitly • Need to situate/relate your findings to existing body of literature 12 What do they mean < 49 – Conclusion 50-69 70 + Conclusion Inconsistent conclusion No clear implications No appreciation of limitations No suggestions for further research Appreciation of limitations Some identification for further research Clear link to theory & how research adds Critical assessment of limitations Conclusions solidly build on findings • Your opportunity to answer your question – explicitly • Conclusions demonstrate what you have added to body of research – NOT a repeat of findings/dissertation • Appreciative of the limitations and further research 13 What do they mean < 49 – Presentation & English 50-69 70 + Presentation & English Poor English Spelling & Grammar mistakes Poorly referenced Reference list incomplete No or inconsistent use of graphics/illustrations Adequate referencing Very few or no spelling & grammar mistakes Some missing references Excellently written No missing references • Referencing • Use of graphics/tables/illustrations • English • Weighting likely to be lower BUT it is about overall impression and clarity of thought • Proof reading! 14 What do they mean < 49 – Structure / Flow 50-69 70 + Structure Illogical structure No clear headings/logic Logical flow between sections/chapters Follows accepted formats Good flow and clear structure • To what extent your structure is helpful and logical • Think about the reader • Clear headings 15 MANG 6550 Dissertation (DSIE) 2021/22 Module Handbook (Part 2) Updated May 2022 version 1.1 This handbook contains the key information that you need to study this module. This handbook will be updated as necessary - please make sure you use the most recent version from the Blackboard site MANG6550 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Table of Contents Section 1. How to use this handbook ..................................................................................... 1 Section 2. What is a dissertation? .......................................................................................... 2 Section 2.1 Choosing a topic ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Section 2.2. Structuring your dissertation......................................................................................................... 5 Section 2.3. Research proposal ............................................................................................................................... 6 Section 3. How will your dissertation be assessed? ............................................................. 7 Section 3.1. Specific marking criteria................................................................................................................... 7 Section 4. Planning your work ............................................................................................. 11 Section 5. Working with your supervisor ........................................................................... 12 Section 6. Ethical approval (ERGO) and Risk Assessment ................................................. 13 Section 6.1. What is ERGO ...................................................................................................................................... 13 Section 6.2. ERGO Amendments .......................................................................................................................... 16 Section 6.3. Risk Assessment Guidelines......................................................................................................... 17 Section 7. Presentation and Formatting ............................................................................. 19 Section 8. Academic Integrity............................................................................................... 21 Section 9. Submission guidance .......................................................................................... 24 Section 10. Additional resources and support links .......................................................... 25 Section 10.1. Recommended software, where needed............................................................................. 25 Section 10.2. Library support and databases................................................................................................ 26 Section 10.3. Study Skills and Language support ........................................................................................ 26 Section 10.4. One-to-one Data Analysis Support Sessions ..................................................................... 26 Appendices............................................................................................................................. 27 Appendix 1. Example of a typical Dissertation Structure........................................................................ 27 Appendix 2. Dissertation Writing Schedule ................................................................................................... 32 Appendix 3. Example of a Research Proposal............................................................................................... 33 Appendix 4. Supervision Meeting Notes.......................................................................................................... 35 Appendix 5. Risk Forms.......................................................................................................................................... 36 Appendix 6. Lists of Databases............................................................................................................................ 53 2 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Welcome to the MANG6550 Dissertation! Welcome to an exciting and important part of your degree – Dissertation. This dissertation represents your chance to apply the theoretical knowledge you have gained throughout your programme through a piece of independent study. You will be able to identify your own area of interest to explore in-depth using appropriate research tools. The dissertation will contribute significantly to your final grade. Please read this handbook carefully and let your supervisor know your questions. Section 1. How to use this handbook This handbook has been written to guide you through the key stages of the process of writing your dissertation. It gives you an idea of timings and deadlines so that you can plan your work. Importantly, it includes essential information on how to choose a research topic, how to work with your supervisors, how to structure your dissertation, and guidance on referencing and avoiding plagiarism etc. We encourage you to read the handbook thoughtfully and go back to it as a reference while working on your dissertation. You can get in touch with the module leader if you have any questions regarding this dissertation handbook. For any enquiries specific to your dissertation, please contact your supervisor. Dr Raymond Xiaoti Hu Email: xiaoti.hu@soton.ac.uk Office: B2/R3037 Feedback and Advice Hours: 1200 – 1400 Wednesday (by appointment only) 1 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Section 2. What is a dissertation? The dissertation is an extended 15,000-word (±10%) assignment based on an independent study of a topic of your own choice. Essentially, it is a test of your ability to create, on your own initiative, a text which demonstrates a Masters-level understanding of a particular issue. You will be assigned a supervisor to advise you on how to approach your work, and it is your responsibility to manage and undertake the necessary work independently. Your dissertation should draw on concepts, techniques and frameworks from your previous studies to: • critically analyse a situation, problem or issue on a theme broadly related to your programme. • critically review existing knowledge by making use of various sources of information. • design and undertake independent guided research using appropriate research strategies and methods for data collection and analysis. • plan and manage a research project under the guidance of your academic supervisor with appropriate ethics approval and risk assessment in place. • write a well-presented dissertation with a logical structure and suitable formatting. By completing the dissertation, you are expected to achieve the following learning outcomes: A. Knowledge and understanding. Having successfully completed the module, you will be able to: A1. the paradigm developed by business researchers. A2. how to scope a study in your subject area, stating clear objectives for your study and ensure that the dissertation addresses these objectives. A3. your chosen subject and related conceptual literature, making appropriate reference to relevant sources of literature. A4. how to use concepts/techniques/frameworks from one or more of your taught modules. A5. different methodologies for business research. 2 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) B. Subject Specific Intellectual and Research Skills. Having successfully completed the module, you will be able to: B1. formulate research aims, objectives and research questions. B2. critically identify and evaluate a body of literature. B3. evaluate and justify your chosen methodology for data collection and analysis. B4. present a clear, logical, and coherent line of argument throughout your dissertation. B5. ensure that your own ideas and analysis are a prominent part of your dissertation. B6. provide in-depth, critical reflection in your analysis and discussion of results. B7. demonstrate the ability to explore the research problem (or test new ideas, if appropriate) including a suitable research design, methodologies, measurements and techniques of analysis. B8. demonstrate the ability to synthesise and present ideas and research findings in a well-structured and convincing way. B9. demonstrate the ability to plan, execute and report a significant piece of research or creative work with at least some element of originality. C. Transferable and Generic Skills. Having successfully completed the module, you will be able to: C1. Critically assess the main types of business research methods. C2. demonstrate your ability to work independently, carry out and evaluate a research project relevant to a business context. C3. demonstrate the ability to interpret, conceptualise and critically evaluate the literature, and to relate it to practice as appropriate. C4. demonstrate independent judgement and critical thinking. Section 2.1 Choosing a topic Choosing a suitable brief for your research topic and then deciding on a more specific title for your dissertation can be a bit daunting, especially if you have not written a dissertation before. In general, more successful dissertations are those that attempt an in-depth study of a focused topic, rather than attempt a wideranging study, which can lack depth. 3 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Your dissertation topic should be clearly relevant to some aspect of your MSc studies and overall degree programme. If you are studying a more generic management programme (such as MSc International Management), your topic could be based on a particular organisational context or related to a generic ‘management’ or ‘business’ issue (for example, this could include Management, Accounting, Finance, Business Analytics, Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Marketing, Organisational Behaviour, etc.). It might also be relevant to your career plans, which can help to enhance your employability. When choosing the research topic, you may consider what kind of dissertation work you want to undertake. Dissertations can take different forms, such as an in-depth critical review of an area of literature, or an empirical work involving quantit ative and/or qualitative analysis of collected data, or a study of a particular problem in an organisation or research area using secondary data or existing databases. Each of these types of dissertation requires a slightly different approach and advice should be sought from your supervisor on the most appropriate way to proceed. You should consider a number of factors when deciding on your topic: • Is the topic original, or has it already been researched by somebody else? • Is the topic relevant to your field of study? • Does the topic have value to organisations, industries, or other researchers in your field? • Is the topic achievable with the time and resources you have available? • Does the topic require access to data (for example to company information) • and if so, do you have that access? You may find the following tips helpful when choosing your research topic: • Identify which broad topics you are interested in, then think about more specific questions within that topic • Think about particular modules which you found enjoyable • Think about topics that relate to your strengths • Think about topics that relate to your career plans 4 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) • Read review articles or quality news sources in the broad topic area that you want to study to find out what has already been researched and if there are any unknowns that might make good topics. The section of future research from your reviewed articles might provide some ideas • Read the section of future research from your reviewed articles that might provide some ideas • Think about access to potential sources of data. Section 2.2. Structuring your dissertation A key feature of any dissertation is the way in which it is structured or organised. Structure is important because it dictates the topics discussed and the order in which they are discussed. A good structure can considerably enhance the finished quality of a dissertation. Characteristics of a good dissertation structure include: • Chapters and sections that are ordered in a logical way • A contents page that clearly differentiates chapter titles and major sub-headings • Chapter and section headings that are informative, concise and accurate • Discussion and analysis that develops logically – from general principles or concepts to more specific or detailed analysis and discussion • Repetition of points is minimal. The structure of your dissertation will vary depending on whether it is primarily literature based (e.g. a systematic literature review), empirical research (e.g. a survey of company employees), or action research (e.g. an application of theory or concept in a real-world setting). Additional Resources: An example of the structure and format of a typical dissertation is provided in Appendix 1. 5 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Section 2.3. Research proposal You should have already written a dissertation proposal as part of this module and received your feedback. You may develop your ideas from that assignment into your dissertation, expanding these ideas as you read more about your topic and develop your research project. You are encouraged to use the proposal to form the basis of your discussions with your supervisor. Alternatively, if you intend to change your dissertation topic, you can draft a new research proposal using the template provided below. The main items to include in your research proposal are: • A topic and tentative title, its background and a justification for its choice • A question for the focus of the study and the main questions to be investigated • An explanation of how your study relates to, builds on, or differs from, previous work in the field (i.e., How do you identify your research gap?) • A description of how and what data will be collected, plus the means of collection • An explanation of how data will be analysed and interpreted and how this will relate back to the initial questions posed • Comments on the practical value of the study (a brief description of the value of your work to either yourself, managers, business or the wider academic community), and any problems that may be relevant to its conduct • A plan outlining your proposed timescale Please note: Your dissertation supervisor will not be able to provide summative feedback on your proposal that has been submitted or remark it. Additional Resources: please see Appendix 3 for an example research proposal template. 6 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Section 3. How will your dissertation be assessed? Masters Dissertations are assessed according to the indicative criteria set out below: 1. Purpose & objectives: Clarity and suitability of the research question, or problem definition, theoretical focus, or case study focus, and t he project /case study development 2. Literature Review: Is there evidence of appropriate selection and discussion of relevant literature? Is there evidence of understanding and critical engagement with what has been read? Does the literature add to the understanding of the problem/ planned development/ case study through effective evaluation and synthesis of a range of literature? 3. Research Methodology: Is the approach adequately explained, appropriate to the problem and data? Does the collected data avoid bias and is it carefully collected? 4. Analysis of Primary and/ or Secondary Data: Collection and analysis 5. Discussion & Findings: Does the discussion of findings reflect (personal) learning from analysis, and an understanding of the implications and limitations, the strengths and weaknesses of the research or development? 6. Conclusion: Do the conclusions do more than re-state the findings? Do they relate to the existing academic debates and /or current evidence? Are they effectively linked to the central theoretical themes/ story/ development? 7. Presentation, Structure & Language: Is it written in clear English? Is it presented using appropriate graphics, illustrations and accurate referencing? Is it well structured, logical and coherent, using appropriate chapter headings? Section 3.1. Specific marking criteria Your dissertation will be marked by two examiners, one of whom is normally your supervisor. Marking follows the University of Southampton Double-Blind Marking and Moderation Policy. 7 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Different weighting may be allocated to each criterion depending on the type of dissertation. Not all criteria may apply to all types of dissertations. Criteria 0 - 24% 25 - 34% 35 - 49% 50 - 59% Pass 60 – 69% Merit 70 - 79% Distinction 80 - 100% Distinction 1. Purpose & objectives Not stated, confusing, unrelated to title, difficult to understand, inappropriate study Very limited lacks effective focus and clear rational Too ambitious or too basic Poorly defined and presented, some confusion in rationale Clearly stated, some relevance, straightforward Well stated purpose, appropriate and realistic explanation of the context /problem/case Very clearly stated, feasible, innovative Exceptionally well stated, interesting, sophisticated, original, full and convincing justification Inadequate and/or irrelevant evidence, virtually no evidence of appropriate selection, no discussion of selection criteria, unsystematic or omitted referencing Rudimentary coverage, very limited evidence of understanding Lacks structure with clear gaps, no discussion of selection criteria, unsystematic referencing. Limited evidence of understanding and evaluation of the selected literature. A basic coverage of relevant literature. Inconsistent referencing, The literature offers some additional understanding of the problem/ project / development of project /case study Good coverage, awareness of relevant prior research, clear structure, stated selection criteria, consistent referencing, clarity of understanding, the literature, informs and adds to the development of the project /case study Comprehensive and inclusive use of highly relevant literature, good structure, clearly articulated discussion that relates to the topic of research Exceptional section that fully demonstrates a discerning, creative and critical engagement with what has been read No theoretical basis, no discussion or justification of Irrelevant, very limited explanation of the Irrelevant theoretical basis, poorly explained approach Some evidence of a theoretical basis, reasonably explained Clear and relevant theoretical basis, appropriate approach, useful Very clear and relevant theoretical basis, persuasive Provides excellent theoretical understanding, rigorously argued • Research question or • Problem definition or • Theoretical focus or • Case study focus • The project /case study development 2. Literature Review • Is there evidence of appropriate selection and discussion of relevant literature? • Is there evidence of understanding of, and critical engagement with what has been read? • Does the literature add to the understanding of the problem/ planned development/ case study through effective evaluation and synthesis of a range of literature? 3. Research Methodology 8 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Criteria 0 - 24% 25 - 34% • Is the approach adequately explained, appropriate to the problem and data? • Do the collected data avoid bias and are they carefully collected? approach, highly inadequate, no evidence of critical evaluation of sources and data approach to the study 4. Analysis of Primary and/ or Secondary Data None, totally inappropriate and unrelated Extremely limited collection of data, poorly identified data, no criteria for evaluation, no analysis Casual acquisition of data, lacks structure, limited evaluation against unclear or inappropriate criteria, mostly descriptive No attempt to relate findings to theory Findings are not effective, discussion shows no learning from the evidence presented Conclusions are not justified by evidence, they do Conclusions poorly justified by evidence, they • Collection and analysis 5. Discussion & Findings • Do the discussion of findings reflect (personal) learning from analysis, and an understanding of the implications and limitations, the strengths and weaknesses of the research or development? 6. Conclusion 35 - 49% 50 - 59% Pass 60 – 69% Merit 70 - 79% Distinction 80 - 100% Distinction and appropriate information. An awareness of strengths and weaknesses of the approach. rationale for research approach, or methods used for the development of a project/ case study, evidence of critical evaluation approach, evidence of exceptional understanding Standard approach to collection, limited validity, limited and basic, but acceptable evaluation or techniques Standard approach to collection, clear validity and reliability, critical analysis using appropriate techniques and appropriate criteria Advanced approaches of collection, clear validity, critical analysis using appropriate techniques and appropriate criteria, fully justified Outstanding analytical techniques and approaches, evidence of creation of new approaches (if appropriate), thorough and rigorous analysis, exceptionally well justified Discussion shows a very limited awareness of theory and attempt to link this to the findings. There is a very limited discussion of the implications, and limitations of the research or development Adequate level of critical analysis and reflection on personal learning. Adequate discussion of implications of the findings and reflection on the strengths and weaknesses of the research or development Some links with theory, discussion justified with appropriate evidence, good critical analysis of the implications of the findings, and reflection on the strengths and weaknesses of the research or development Comprehensive links with theory, complete justification with appropriate evidence, very good critical analysis of the implications of the findings, and reflection on the strengths and weaknesses of the research or development Sophisticated and critical discussion of the issues involved, outstanding reflection on the strengths and weaknesses of the research, offers fresh/new insights on the problem or development Conclusions have limited justification in the Adequate attempt to use evidence to reach appropriate Clear conclusions relating to the topic of the Clear conclusions with a very good relationship to the Exceptional conclusions that relate strongly to 9 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Criteria 0 - 24% 25 - 34% 35 - 49% 50 - 59% Pass 60 – 69% Merit 70 - 79% Distinction 80 - 100% Distinction • Do the conclusions do more than re-state the findings? Do they relate to the existing academic debates and /or current evidence? Are they effectively linked to the central theoretical themes/ story/ development? not relate to the topic of the dissertation, their development is unclear and incomplete, no recommendations / opportunities for further development have a poor relationship to the topic of the dissertation, their development is of poor quality, recommendations / opportunities for further development are not of practical use evidence, there is limited relationship to existing theory and the topic of the dissertation, very limited recommendations / opportunities for further development conclusions that relate to the topic of the dissertation, conclusions may be general and uncritical, adequate recommendations / opportunities for further development dissertation and justified by the evidence. topic of the dissertation and justified well by the evidence. the topic of the dissertation with excellent justification in the evidence. Conclusions add new insight to the topic of the dissertation and identify clear and practical recommendations / opportunities for further development 7. Presentation, Structure & Language Mostly inarticulate and incomprehensible, very hard to understand and follow, confused and unstructured Poor presentation, many spelling and grammatical errors, difficult to understand, inappropriately structured Basic layout, inconsistent flow, a few spelling and grammatical errors, poor citation and reference list, poor structure, confused. Adequate use of graphics and charts, good command of spelling and grammar, some typos, some omissions or inconsistencies in the reference list, most sections have a logical flow and structure Clear and effective use of graphics and charts, no spelling or grammatical errors, appropriate and consistent referencing, logical, clear and coherent structure • Is it written in good English? • Is it presented using appropriate graphics, illustrations and accurate referencing? • Is it well structured, logical and coherent, using appropriate chapter headings? Identifies clear recommendations / opportunities for further development Identifies clear and practical recommendations / opportunities for further development Very good logical flow and cohesion, Discerning use of graphics, charts and tables, no spelling or grammatical errors, appropriate and consistent referencing, well developed and appropriate structure Outstanding logical flow, excellent use of language, appealing and effective use of graphics, charts and tables, appropriate and consistent referencing, very skilfully developed structure, outstanding logical flow, most effective use of conventions appropriate for purpose 10 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Section 4. Planning your work Students following a full time MSc programme are expected to complete their dissertations for submission on the 15th September 2022. Give yourself as much time as possible to complete your dissertation by starting early. No two dissertations are the same and different projects will progress at different rates. Table 1 below therefore shows indicative key stages in a generic dissertation process with suggested dates for full-time students. The dates here are for guidance and you should plan target dates for your dissertation with your supervisor. For part-time students, key milestones should be adjusted in discussion with your supervisor. Table 1: The Key Stages in a generic dissertation process. Key Date/Time Key Events March Submit research proposal. April Research proposal feedback provided. April/May Submit proposed topic idea and methodology. Mid May Launch MANG6550 Dissertation Handbook (Part 2) First meeting with Discuss title and broad approach with supervisor. Also supervisor: End May/earlyensure ERGO and risk approval process considered. June Second meeting with Confirm dissertation topic with supervisor. Discuss plans for supervisor: Early-mid Junedata collection. Consider what ethics approval or risk assessment may be needed. Discuss with your supervisor and draft ERGO paperwork. Third meeting with Discuss the literature. Discuss/agree on a more detailed supervisor: Mid-end June data protocol/design. Finalise ERGO submission. Forth meeting with ERGO documentation should be completed and submitted supervisor: End June/early(ERGO deadline 1st July 2022). Progress update. Submit a July draft chapter (usually either literature review or methodology). Fifth meeting with Progress meeting. Feedback on first draft chapter. Submit supervisor: Early-mid July second draft chapter. Utilise data analysis tutorials. Sixth meeting with Feedback on second draft chapter. Discuss preliminary supervisor: End July findings if available. Final checks on dissertation structure. Supervision ends. th Thursday 15 Submission deadline September 2022 16:00 Additional Resources: you can use the template in Appendix 2 to plan a schedule for your dissertation. 11 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Section 5. Working with your supervisor After you have submitted your topic outline, you will be assigned a supervisor by the module leader. Please note: if your dissertation topic changes, we will not be able to change your supervisor. The role of your supervisor is to: • Advise on the suitability of the title and scope of your dissertation • Advise on an appropriate dissertation structure • Advise on the suitability of your methodology • Advise on your ethics and ERGO application • Advise you on your work timetable • Provide formative feedback on your proposal and two chapters of your dissertation (once only and providing these are submitted by the dates agreed with your supervisor) Supervisors will not normally provide specific advice or guidance on sources of information or literature for your particular topic. The time available for supervision is six hours in total. This time includes group and individual meetings, approving your ERGO application, risk review, email correspondence, and reading/ advising on chapters. Please understand that you should not expect your supervisor to be available during non-working hours. Please also don’t expect an instant response, or frequent and lengthy guidance. To get the most from meeting with your supervisor: • Be proactive about contacting your supervisor for meetings, it is up to you to drive the process. • Attend all meetings or reschedule them if you are not able to attend . • Prepare for your meetings by reading your notes from the previous meeting and completing any actions that you have agreed. • Send your draft chapter in advance if your meeting is going to discuss your writing. • You may send a list of your concerns or questions to your supervisor before 12 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) your meeting. • Use a range of communication methods (e.g., face-to-face meetings where if possible, email, phone, Teams etc.). Additional Resources: you are welcome to use the form in Appendix 4 to record your meetings with your supervisor. Section 6. Ethical approval (ERGO) and Risk Assessment Guidelines for ethical approval are based on the belief that all your work should be conducted within an ethic of respect for persons, respect for knowledge, respect for the quality of project, and respect for justice and within the law. In any study, participants will have to establish precise ethical principles of procedure taking the specific context into account. The University of Southampton Research Ethics Policy can be found at: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/about/governance/policies/ethics.page. Section 6.1. What is ERGO The University uses an online system called ERGO (Ethics and Research Governance Online) to ensure that you maintain the highest standard of ethics and risk management for your dissertation. ERGO ensures that you have considered ethics and assessed ethical and reputational risks related to your study. Please note, you must also carry out a separate risk review and possibly a risk assessment, which will mean that you are then covered by university Insurance. You MUST use ERGO to complete all of the relevant ethics forms for the type of research you are conducting and submit them online. You MUST obtain ERGO approval before collecting any data. Under no circumstances will ERGO approval be granted retrospectively. To create your ERGO application, please go to https://ergo2.soton.ac.uk/. For this application, you will need to use your University login and click ‘Create a new 13 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) submission’ to do this. Note that you will have an ERGO reference number from the ‘Submission Overview’ tab of your application. Please make a note of your ERGO number. You need to insert it in various documents and cite it if you have an enquiry. There are a range of forms in ERGO, which you will need to work through. You are recommended to approach your supervisor at a very early stage to discuss what you need to do, and which of the documents you need to use for your project. Complete the ‘Submission Questionnaire’ first, the system will then indicate which additional forms you will need to complete. Table 2 below indicates which forms are required for different types of dissertation: Table 2: Information of ERGO Application Forms. Type of Dissertation Secondary data: no individuals • Analysis of aggregated individual level data in existing databases (listed in Appendix 6) • Analysis of data not relating to individuals (e.g. data on firms or businesses; financial data) • Critical/systematic literature review or meta-analysis (i.e. the analysis of academic literature). Secondary data: incl. individuals • Secondary data sets (interviews or surveys) involving human participants Social media data Interviews and/or focus groups Questionnaire Additional Forms required None (just the ERGO Submission Questionnaire) Also include: • Ethics Application for Secondary Data Analysis Also include: Ethics Application Form for Social Media Analysis Also include: • Ethics Application Form • Consent Form for UG and PGT students • Participant Information Sheet for UG and PGT students • Debriefing Form (if deception used) • A list of your questions • Letter/email of invitation if researching in an organisation. (Organisational approval must be acquired before the research / recruitment begins) Also include: • Ethics Application Form • Combined PIS and Consent Form for Anonymous Online Surveys v1.1 (will be first page of your questionnaire) 14 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) • • • • Debriefing Form (will be last page of questionnaire if deception used) Invitation email (that you will send to respondents) A draft of your questionnaire Letter/email of invitation if researching in an organisation. (Organisational approval must be acquired before the research / recruitment begins). Failure to get ERGO approval before collecting or analysing data is a breach of academic integrity. You will not be able to use any data collected before ERGO approval in your final dissertation. You should therefore ensure that the stated dates for conducting research are consistent on all forms that are presented to ERGO. Ensure that you have allowed sufficient time to receive ERGO approval. You should be aware that approval may take up to 3 weeks. For example, if you submit your ERGO application on 1 st May, you may not receive approval until 21 st May. You should NOT therefore plan to collect data until at least three weeks after you submit your ERGO forms. If you are collecting primary data, the date that you enter on your ERGO application as the date you will start to collect your data should be after the date you expect to receive ERGO approval. Once you have completed the Submission Questionnaire and uploaded the necessary forms, click ‘Submit’. At this point you will be able to add any additional comments for the reviewers. You should then add a Supervisor to your submission (this will be your dissertation supervisor). Once you have added your supervisor, there are a few more questions to answer, and then you can click “Submit” to submit your application. You will both receive an email confirming your submission to the ethics system. It is good practice to contact your supervisor to let them know that your ERGO application is ready to review. PLEASE NOTE: If you are requested to revise your ethics application you will need to address all the corrections recommended and consequently should adjust your data collection dates accordingly. 15 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) If you are going to try a different way of collecting your data or recruiting participants, you must submit an amendment to your ethics application and wait for it to be approved. This may take a further three weeks. Section 6.2. ERGO Amendments Given that the ERGO process may take up to 3 weeks, please give yourself enough time for the process to go through and do not submit another ERGO application due to anxiety of waiting. This will actually slow down the process. There is considerable flexibility in your initial ERGO application. For example, you may change the title of your project after your application has been approved without needing to re-submit your ERGO form. If you think that you may need to re-apply to ERGO, because of any change to your original application, please CHECK WITH YOUR SUPERVISOR first. You DO NOT revise your ERGO application for any of the following: • If you are modifying a questionnaire by adding, deleting or changing some questions • If you are modifying the number of interviews you intend to complete • If you are transferring from a secondary financial database to another. For example, it is acceptable to change from CSMAR to Compustat without needing to change your ERGO application • If you are changing the sample size of secondary data • If you are changing your method of data analysis. For example, changing from using NVivo to a manual system • If you decide to omit something for which you already have approval. For example, you may decide that you will not have time to conduct a Focus Group that was part of your initial methods If you are modifying your dissertation title. • You DO need to revise your ERGO application for any of the following: • You are changing your research design. For example, from qualitative to quantitative research 16 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) • You are changing your data collection method. For example, from a secondary database to a primary data source; from administering a questionnaire electronically to conducting face-to-face interviews • If you are adding something to your original design or methods. For example, if you subsequently decide that you want to meet with a Focus Group • You change the subject or initial direction to a new topic for research. Section 6.3. Risk Assessment Guidelines Supervisors are responsible for ensuring risk reviews are completed for all dissertation research studies. In addition to obtaining ERGO approval you are required to complete a risk review for your planned dissertation research. This must be done BEFORE you begin collecting any data. This is to ensure that you consider fully all the risks to yourself and others for both on-site (e.g., interviews) and offsite research (e.g., surveys), including both domestic and international travel and research conducted outside the university or the UK. 17 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) The risk review will help you identify whether you require a full risk assessment. If a risk assessment is needed it will help you to assess the risks and think about how to reduce them. If travel is considered essential to your research, you and your supervisor must request permission from the Dean for international travel and Head of School for UK travel. Additional Resources: all Risk Assessment templates are available at Appendix 5. Stage One – Prepare for your meeting with your supervisor about the risk review 1. Read through the risk review form. 2. Agree the form with your supervisor and if you need to, complete a full risk assessment. 3. If you don’t need a full risk assessment, make sure that both you and your supervisor keep copies of the fully completed risk review. 4. If you do need to complete a risk assessment move on to stage two below. Stage Two – Risk Assessment (SBS ON- CAMPUS or SBS OFF-SITE) 5. Read through the risk assessment form to familiarise yourself with what information you will need to complete with your supervisor in your risk assessment meeting. 6. Read the basic guidance on how to assess and control risks. 7. Consider what potential hazards there are going to be (meeting students or visitors on campus, travel, working, living in a foreign country etc.), both regarding your health as well as your personal safety. 8. If there is anything you do not understand, or do not know, please speak to your supervisor in your risk assessment meeting. Stage Three – Risk Matrix 9. This is a general template only, so consider how it could apply to your own research. 10. For each risk you will need to estimate the inherent risk to yourself. You will discuss this with your supervisor. 11. If you know of a risk relevant to your research which is not mentioned on the form, please advise your supervisor. 18 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) 12. Through discussion with your supervisor, you will consider controls to reduce any risk. 13. The matrix includes suggested controls but you can add to this if you think of any further action you could take. Stage Four – Approval Confirmation 14. Make sure the risk assessment is signed by both yourself and your supervisor. 15. If there are any risks which may pose particular problems and cannot be mitigated, the risk assessment will need to be considered by the Head of School, and this may require a change of plans. 16. Once completed, ensure that you keep a copy for yourself and for your next of kin! It’s important to keep all your contact details safe and remind yourself of what control measures you should be undertaking when doing potentially hazardous activities. Finally, If, during your research, if you feel that a risk has significantly increased, please notify your supervisor as you may need to complete a new risk assessment. Section 7. Presentation and Formatting Good presentation is important because it ensures that all your hard work is efficiently and effectively communicated to the reader. It implies neatly set out work; a well-organised, clear and logical structure; and clear, understandable analysis. In particular, it is important to ensure that you: • Write clear, grammatically correct English without spelling mistakes. Remember the Study Skills and Language support available (see details at http://www.sbsaob.soton.ac.uk/study-skills-and-language-support/). • Make use of chapters, helpful headings, and subheadings to structure your work clearly (see example above). Number your chapters, and number sections within each chapter. Don’t forget page numbering throughout. • Format pages, headings and paragraphs to make the text easy to read. • Clearly cite ALL sources of information and list FULL details of ALL cited sources in a list of references. 19 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) • Logically order material across and within individual chapters. • Tables, graphs and figures are effective ways of presenting data, especially in the results and analysis sections of your dissertation. You should label tables and figures clearly and refer to them consistently in the table of contents and text of your dissertation. Be sure to cite the source of any figures or tables (if you have not developed them yourself). • If possible, try not to split tables over two pages. You may need to use a slightly smaller font in tables, or format column headings to read vertically in order to do this. Formatting requirements by the Southampton Business School All dissertations must be in Arial size 12 font typescript at 1.5 line spacing. Double spacing may be used at a candidate's discretion for parts involving formulae. The page size should be A4 (210 x 297 mm). Exemption from the use of this size can only be granted by the School in cases where the subject matter of the project renders the A4 size unsuitable. Margins should not be less than 38mm. Pages should be numbered consecutively. Tables and diagrams must be numbered serially in typescript. Word Limit: The word limit for your dissertation is 15,000 words. Unless stipulated by the Module Leader, 15,000 (±10%) words is deemed to be acceptable. Any text that exceeds an additional 10% will not attract any marks. The relevant word count includes items such as cover page, executive summary/abstract, title page, table of contents, tables, figures, in-text citations and section headings, if used. The relevant word count excludes your list of references and any appendices at the end of your dissertation submission. Beyond the above points, if you are not sure about whether something is included or not in the relevant word count, please do ask the programme leader. 20 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Appendices: Appendices are not always needed or expected, but they can be a useful way of providing supplementary material which your dissertation draws on but which is not essential for the reading of the dissertation. It may include background material, supporting evidence or synthetic visuals. Additionally, appendices may contain detailed quantitative, statistical and/or qualitative data, which might be important for further reference but is not directly related to the main thrust of your argument. The attention of the reader should be drawn to the content of the appendices at the relevant parts of the dissertation. Statistical and other analysis of direct relevance to the written text must be included in the main body of the dissertation, possibly as graphs or histograms. Appendices are not a dumping ground for material that you are uncertain how to use and you should be critical about whether the material adds value to your dissertation. You should always include the word count (from Microsoft Word), at the end of your dissertation, before your list of references. Section 8. Academic Integrity By now you should be familiar with the requirement for academic integrity in all the work you do. Given the nature of the dissertation, it is particularly important that you are careful to avoid breaching academic integrity in your dissertation. In previous years students have received significantly reduced marks (in some cases zero) as a result of breaching academic integrity, with consequent significant implications for achieving their qualification overall. It is your responsibility to ensure that your dissertation meets the University regulations for Academic Integrity. These are available at: http://www.calendar.soton.ac.uk/sectionIV/academic-integrity-regs.html Apart from plagiarism, there are also some other breaches of Academic Integrity regulations. If you would like to understand more about the academic integrity regulations, please visit the updated University advice here: 21 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) https://www.southampton.ac.uk/~assets/doc/calendar/Academic%20Integrity%20 Regulations.pdf. The following are definitions of breaches of Academic Integrity from the University Calendar. In extreme cases, these may result in failure of the dissertation module or your overall programme: • Plagiarism: is the use of ideas, intellectual property or work of others without acknowledgement or permission, as appropriate. • ‘Cutting and pasting’: Cutting and pasting of textual material is poor practice and is best avoided altogether, even if you cite material properly and put everything in quotations. The presence of large amounts of cut and pasted material usually demonstrates lack of understanding, lack of originality, rushed work. • Cheating/Collusion: is any action before, during or after an assessment or examination or assessment by which the student seeks to gain unfair advantage or assists another student to do so. • Falsification: is any attempt to present fictitious or distorted data, evidence, references, experimental results or other material and/or knowingly to make use of such material. • Recycling: is where a piece of work which has already been used in one context is used again (without declaration and without the University's permission) in another context. • Breaching ethical standards: is failing to comply with your ethical obligations when carrying out your Academic Work as set out in the University Ethics Policy and the applicable ethical requirements for your subject area, such as failing to obtain free and informed consent. • Misconduct in Research: includes any of the above examples in relation to research and/or other factors including a failure to comply with regulatory, legal and professional obligations such as a breach of confidentiality, infringement of intellectual property rights, failure to take due care for participants in research or of personal data, and abuse of research subjects or materials (including artefacts). • External Authorship/Assistance: is where somebody else, outside of the university, contributes towards your work. This can be either paid or 22 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) unpaid. Only submit your own work – presenting others’ work as your own is cheating. Additional guidance on recycling Recycling (sometimes known as 'self-plagiarism') is an academic offence and is defined in the University academic regulations as: “where a piece of work which has already been used in one context is used again (without declaration and without the University's permission) in another context.” (University of Southampton Calendar) Southampton Business School gives you permission to use material from any research proposal that you may have previously submitted as assessed coursework for your current programme of study. This is acknowledged in the declaration of authorship (see example title page above) and, as long as you have included this declaration on your title page you do not need to further reference work from your research proposal. If you include material from assessed coursework other than research proposals, (for example essays relating to the subject of your dissertation) then you must acknowledge this as a source in your references. Material that has been previously submitted for assignments (other than research proposals) will not attract marks for your dissertation. It is good academic practice to expand and develop on previous work and acknowledge the original source, even if it is your own work. You can refer to your own work in the Harvard Referencing style as follows: Surname, Initial. (Year of submission) 'Title of essay/assignment', Module code: Module title. Institution. Unpublished essay/assignment. For example: Bloggs, J. (2016) 'Globalisation has increased the complexity of managing people in the 21st century. Briefly summarise why this is and, where possible, illustrate your understanding of this complexity with reference to real world examples.', MANG6212: Essay Writing Skills. University of Southampton. Unpublished essay. 23 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Referencing It is essential that you indicate clearly throughout your dissertation the source of any material you refer to including papers, textbooks, websites, interviews, newspapers, questionnaires, etc. This applies to all text, diagrams, data, tables, and appendices in your dissertation. You should refer to the latest version of the Business School Harvard Referencing Guide produced by the library. This is available from https://library.soton.ac.uk/sash/referencing Section 9. Submission guidance Specific guidance on how to submit your dissertation via e-assignment will be provided in advance of the submission date. Your dissertation will be marked by two examiners, one of whom is normally your supervisor. Marking follows the University of Southampton Double-Blind Marking and Moderation Policy. Late Submission Late submissions will be penalised in accordance with the standard University of Southampton regulations that apply to your programme. Extension Requests There are strict criteria for granting extensions. You will need to fill in a form available on the Student Hub – full advice on this is given here but you should consult your supervisor and personal academic tutor as advised. Extension requests, along with supporting evidence, should be submitted prior to the submission date. Extensions can only be granted for circumstances beyond your control. Further information regarding the regulations governing extension requests can be accessed via the Calendar: http://www.calendar.soton.ac.uk/sectionIV/special-considerations.html Full guidance on Extensions can be found on the Quality Handbook: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/quality/assessment/special_considerations.page Special Considerations If you believe that illness or other circumstances have adversely affected your academic performance, you must complete a Special Considerations form. All 24 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) claims must be substantiated by written documentary evidence, for example a medical certificate or GP/consultant letter, self-certification or a statement from your academic tutor. The purpose of asking for supporting documentation is for you to be able to corroborate the facts of your submission. All claims will be reviewed by the Faculty’s Special Considerations Board. Information regarding the regulations governing Special Considerations can be accessed via the Calendar: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/calendar/sectioniv/index.page The Special Considerations Request Form can be found on the Student Hub and you will find full guidance there, including advice to talk to your supervisor or tutor. The Quality Handbook contains further guidance: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/quality/assessment/special_considerations.page? Attendance Requirements Tier 4 Visa holders should be aware that there are strict requirements until their programme end date. More information is available at: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/studentservices/visa-and-immigration/duringyour-studies/attendance-and-absence.page Section 10. Additional resources and support links Section 10.1. Recommended software, where needed  The University recommends and offers support for various survey software. Microsoft forms is recommended for simple surveys – see the iSolutions page at this link (https://sotonac.sharepoint.com/teams/IT/SitePages/Survey - Applications.aspx?cid=b75c1fb9-65de-4445-8700-1e50b1f5c920)  Qualtrics is also available for conducting more complex on-line surveys. To register a Southampton Qualtrics account you need to follow this link (https://soton.eu.qualtrics.com/login) by using your University email account. Please note that the Faculty discourages students from surveying University of Southampton staff or/ and students. If you decide to do so, you will need to obtain a permission from the Head of School or the Dean. 25 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Section 10.2. Library support and databases  Guidance on literature sources and library support is available from: http://library.soton.ac.uk/business/home  Guidance on the databases available to support your dissertation research is available from:  http://library.soton.ac.uk/business/databases  Specific guidance on financial databases is available from Finlab and there will be further support offered in the summer. Additional Resources: you can find more Databases information in Appendix 6. Section 10.3. Study Skills and Language support Southampton Business School students can access a wide range of support to help you to develop study skills and improve your academic English as you complete your dissertation. There will be lots of relevant resources on your Blackboard module for S4B. LinkedIn Learning is a library of high-quality video tutorials on a wide range of software and business topics. Your University account gives you access to all of it for free. A series of materials relating to research methods can be found here: https://generic.wordpress.soton.ac.uk/researchmethods/ Section 10.4. One-to-one Data Analysis Support Sessions The Education Development Office (EDO) at Southampton Business School will offer a series of tutorial sessions to support PGT students in doing data analysis for their dissertations. Specifically, qualitative/quantitative/financial data analysis and ERGO will be covered in these sessions. Students can book one-to-one sessions to speak to a data tutor, and each session runs for 20 minutes. Students will receive an email when these sessions become available. 26 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Appendices Appendix 1. Example of a typical Dissertation Structure PLEASE NOTE: the dissertation structure may vary depending on the type and subject of the research. The University of Southampton 2021/22 Faculty of Social Sciences Southampton Business School MSc Dissertation (Title of your dissertation) ERGO number: (your ERGO reference number) Student number: (your student registration number) Presented for MSc (your degree programme) This project is entirely the original work of student registration number (your student number). I declare that this dissertation is my own work, and that where material is obtained from published or unpublished works, this has been fully acknowledged in the references. This dissertation may include material of my own work from a research proposal that has been previously submitted for assessment for this programme. Word Count: xxxxx words [INCLUDE A PAGE BREAK AFTER EACH SECTION] 27 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Abstract The abstract is a brief summary of your dissertation (normally no more than 300 words) that includes: a summary of the situation or problem you have researched; an overview of the methods you have used to investigate it; what you found out and your main conclusions and recommendations. Acknowledgements This section is optional and provides an opportunity to thank those who have supported you with your dissertation (for example friends, family, academics, or participants) Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction……………………………………………………………………..1 Chapter 2: Literature Review………………………………………………………………2 2.1 Sub section……………………………………………………….……………..3 2.1.1 Sub sub section etc……………………………………….………….4 Chapter 3 Methodology…………………………………………………………………….5 etc… List of Tables Table 4.1. Example of a table in a dissertation document……………………….……..6 etc… List of Figures Figure 4.1 Graph showing the relationship between one thing and another thing…..6 etc. Chapter 1: Introduction 1.1 All dissertations should have an effective introduction which may include the following: • A brief explanation of the nature and significance of the dissertation topic, and the problems or issues implicit in the dissertation title. Some contextual statistics/general information may be useful here. • What your interest/motivation for working on this topic is (for example, relevant previous work experience, or personal links with a company or issue). 28 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) • The objectives of your dissertation. • An outline of the approach/methodology you have adopted. • An overview of the line of argument your dissertation will follow (not simply a list of what each chapter contains). Chapter 2: Literature review 2.1 Discusses prior research in order to: identify relevant theories and concepts; describe the extent of current understanding and identify outstanding problems/issues. An effective review will critically analyse the literature to support the rationale for your dissertation research by: • Comparing and contrasting different perspectives in the literature • Evaluating the relevance, reliability and validity of the sources • Identifying any limitations or biases that may have affected the research • Identifying connections between the literature and how knowledge of the subject is structured • Identifying how the literature is relevant to the topic of your dissertation Chapter 3: Methodology 3.1 Expands on the literature review to provide a rationale for the research and its objectives and describe the research method that has been used. For example, if you have used a questionnaire, your methodology may: • Identify the pros and cons of questionnaires to explain your reasons for choosing this methodology • Explain the rationale for the questions asked, relating this to your literature review, and giving reasons for the questionnaire structure adopted (e.g. multiple choice, Likert scales etc.) • Provide a complete list of questions either in the text or in an appendix • Explain who was involved, how and why they were selected (ie. your sampling) • Explain how the questionnaire was delivered and why (e.g. online) Chapter 4: Results and Analysis (sometimes called Findings) 4.1 Present results in as complete, clear and helpful way as possible, analyse results in a 29 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) useful way, critically comment on the quality of responses and the reliability/limitations of the findings. It is common to use tables and figures in this section to communicate your data clearly and concisely. Tables and figures should be numbered and titled. Refer to tables and figures in your text by using the table or figure number. For example (see Table 4.1 or see Figure 4.1 below). Table 4.1: Example of a table in a dissertation document Category Result 1 Result 2 Category 1 Data 1 Data 2 Category 2 etc… Data 3 Data 4 6 Another thing 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 One thing Figure 4.1 Graph showing the relationship between one thing and another thing Chapter 5: Discussion 5.1 Relate your findings back to the literature review, discuss similarities and differences. Explain the implications of your findings for managers and decision makers. Chapter 6: Conclusion 6.1 All dissertations need a conclusion chapter that adds value, rather than merely summarises previous chapters. An effective conclusion should include: • A brief summary of key points made in the dissertation. 30 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) • A ‘so what?’ section which discusses the implications of the dissertation for: (a) a given organisation context, (b) organisations in general and (c) concept/theory/technique development. There may also be implications for any stakeholder, such as policy makers. • Limitations of the scope, quality, and validity of the analysis undertaken in the dissertation. • Recommendations for further research. • Personal reflections on any challenges in designing and carrying out your research (if any), and what you have learnt. References A single list of all sources used in your dissertation using Harvard referencing. You should consult the library webpages for guidance on how to reference with Harvard using the examples in Cite Them Right (available online via the library webpages or in hardcopy). See http://library.soton.ac.uk/sash/referencing for more information. Appendix 1 Label each appendix using roman numerals (e.g. Appendix I, Appendix II, Appendix III etc.) and pages numbered within the appendix (I1, I2, ... II1, II2 etc). 31 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Appendix 2. Dissertation Writing Schedule Use this schedule template to help you to plan your dissertation writing process. You may find the following tips helpful: • It is best to start with the submission date and work backwards. • Plan to submit your dissertation at least two weeks before the final deadline to give you some protection against delays caused by unexpected problems. • Include in the schedule any other major commitments you may have during the dissertation-writing period (e.g., examination revision). • Once you have drafted your schedule, think about when would be the best times for you to meet with your supervisor, agree the dates with your supervisor and insert them into the schedule. Stage of the dissertation writing process Number of days/ weeks needed Start date End date STAGE ONE: Reading and research a) Seek to identify an original, manageable topic b) Reading & research into chosen topic STAGE TWO: The detailed plan a) Construct a detailed plan of the dissertation STAGE THREE: Initial writing a) Draft the various sections of the dissertation b) Undertake additional research where necessary STAGE FOUR: The first draft a) Compile and collate sections into first draft of dissertation b) Check the flow of the dissertation c) Check the length of the dissertation d) Undertake any additional editing and research STAGE FIVE: Final draft a) Check for errors b) Prepare for submission c) Final proof-read and final editing d) Compile reference list e) Submit your dissertation 32 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Appendix 3. Example of a Research Proposal The University of Southampton Business School MSc Dissertation – Research Proposal, Ethical Approval and Risk Assessment This will be the basis for initial discussion as to the ethics and/ or risk approval (ERGO) you need. Please check the ‘Proposal/ Topic Submission’ folder in the Blackboard Dissertation module for guidance on how to submit for your programme and print out a copy for your first meeting with your supervisor. (Please note: you are not required to do this if you are conducting an industry-sponsored project). Once completed the proposal should be approximately 2-sides of typed A4. NAME (in full): ............................................................... Student No.: …......................... Programme: ................................................................................................................... Proposed Dissertation Title: …………………………………………………………………………... a) Briefly explain your research question(s) b) Briefly explain your methodology and your reasons for choosing it. c) Give two key references (research papers or books?), which you have used to inform your choice. 33 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) d) According to your research design above, do you need ethical approval for working with human participants (e.g. surveys) or potentially sensitive secondary data (e.g. combining data from multiple sources)? YES/ NO (NOTE all dissertation research must be entered on the UoS ethics approval system, ERGO) Supervisor Comments - This section may be used by your supervisor to provide feedback after your first meeting. Please note: some supervisors may provide feedback in other ways. (To be printed for discussion and signature: one copy may be retained by supervisor) Student Signature Supervisor Signature Print name Print name 34 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Appendix 4. Supervision Meeting Notes Use this template for recording your supervision meetings. Meeting Date: General notes: Agreed action points: Action Deadline Supervisor: Date: Signed ______________________ Student: Date: Signed_______________________ 35 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Appendix 5. Risk Forms 1. University of Southampton Health & Safety – Research Risk Review Form Please tick the box that applies to you - Undergraduate ☐ Postgraduate (Taught) ☐ Degree programme/Certificate : Name: University email address: Supervisor : Other researchers /collaborators (if applicable): Title of Study: Expected start date and duration: 1. Does your research involve collecting your own (primary) data? Specifically, do you intend to use: Interviews/ Focus Groups: YES ☐ NO ☐ 2. Questionnaires/Surveys: YES ☐ NO ☐ 3. Physical Observation/ Company Visits: YES ☐ NO ☐ If you have answered ‘NO’ to all of the above you do not need to do a full risk assessment.. If you answered ‘YES’ to any question please answer question 2 2. You have indicated above that you will collect your own data – how will you collect it? Method of data collection (please tick all relevant boxes): a) OFF-SITE research ☐ b) ON-CAMPUS interviews ☐ c) Teams or online: ☐ d) Telephone ☐ e) Email/Web ☐ f) Post ☐ If your answer to a) or b) above is yes, you will need to complete a full risk assessment. If you are collecting data remotely, by phone, online or by post, you are not at any additional risk in comparison to normal university activities. If your planned research requires on-campus interviews you need to consider all possible risks. This also applies for travel and off-site visits, when you must also understand if your activities will be covered by University insurance or if you need to have your own cover. Due to COVID19 t he current university advice is that only absolutely essential travel of any kind is permitted. 3. If you are intending to collect data face to face during a visit what travel will this involve? Nature of travel (please tick all relevant boxes): a) Day visits within the UK ☐ b) Overnight stays within the UK: ☐ c) Day visits in home country ☐ d) Overnight stays within home country ☐ e) Other ☐ If your planned research requires travel and off-site visits, and in particular overnight stays, you need to consider all possible risks and understand if your activities wi ll be covered by University insurance or if you need to have your own cover. Due to COVID19 the current university advice is that only absolutely essential travel of any kind is permitted. Student Signature: Date Supervisor Signature: Date 36 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) 2. SBS OFF-SITE Dissertation Generic Risk Assessment *Generic Risk Assessment for Southampton Business School Students carrying out OFF-SITE research for their dissertations NOTE: Students undertaking research for their dissertations may be involved in visiting organisations or companies to carry out int erviews or gather data. This risk assessment is intended to ensure students consider and mitigate these risks and any involved in t ravelling or other activities connected to it. 1. The Supervisor may sign either this unaltered generic document, or one which includes additional low risk hazards in PART G, which are not identified in PARTS A-F. The title above must be changed from *Generic to Specific. 2. Any proposed additional hazards of concern/higher risk should be referred to the Head of School. If approved, then a specific risk assessment must be completed by the Student, independently or together with the Supervisor. This document can b e used as a template, but the title above must be changed from *Generic to Specific. Before you commit to this form: 1. Read through this generic risk assessment and decide whether all hazards relevant to the proposed research are covered 2. If existing hazards are identified as needing further controls for ANY category, then these must be entered in the further controls column 3. If there is any additional hazard not included in this risk assessment, it must be added in Part G 4. Once all hazards have been recognised, residual risks must be calculated depending on the individual situation and control measures. Refer t o the assessment guidance at the bottom of this document to calculate the risks Important: • • It is an essential requirement that a copy of the final version of this risk assessment is kept by the student and by the supervisor An incident/accident report must still be completed where incidents occur out of the office, but whilst working on University business, whether in the UK or overseas. LINK: Incident Reporting Information to assist with determining generic/specific requirements TRAVEL/ACTIVITIES that may require further/specific assessment due to an increased, may include but are not restricted to: ◼ Travel Warnings ◼ Health Warnings ◼ Terrorist Warnings ◼ Natural Disasters ◼ Political unrest ◼ Extreme Weather ◼ Any other warnings – so please check as requested. ◼ Personal Physical/Mental Health support/requirements ◼ Organisational Risks (ie. Factories/Construction Sites) ◼ Overseas Research 37 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Risk Assessment for the Activity of Research for UG or PGT dissertations Note of declaration for this Generic Risk Assessment: After careful consideration of the content of this document and the proposed overall low risk research, the Student and Supervisor have both confirmed that this is a suitable & sufficient risk assessment in each of the following categories - PARTS A-G inclusive. It is mandatory for the Student and Supervisor to read and understand this generic risk assessment, and for the Student to adhere to the controls for all the relevant hazards that will/may apply. Note of declaration for a Specific Risk Assessment: After careful consideration of the content of this specific risk assessment and the proposed research, the Student and Supervisor have both confirmed that this is a suitable & sufficient risk assessment in each of the following categories - PARTS A-G inclusive. It is mandatory for the Student and Supervisor to read and understand the specific risk assessment, and for the Student to adhere to the controls for all the relevant hazards that will/may apply. Student Name University of Southampton School/Programme/Year Student Signature and date Supervisor Name If permission for travel or specific activities needed: Date Signature Date Signature Date Head of School/Dean of Faculty Name NB When filling in this risk assessment there may be sections within PARTS A-F which are not relevant to your research activity. If both you and your supervisor agree, then you may strike through those you have identified as unnecessary, for your individual research. But be aware that any condition/ situation identified as HIGH RISK will require further careful consideration and will need a specific risk assessment. 38 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) 1. Lack of awareness of area/location of organisation and associated accommodation Threat to personal safety due to evident lack of confidence in unfamiliar surroundings/ locations 2. Adverse weather conditions Delays, anxiety, additional costs, Injury Student 3. Terrorism, natural disasters, hostage/political/re ligious situations Injury, imprisonment etc. Student, those nearby, those in the vicinity, members of the public Likelihood Score (3) Risk management Residual Further controls (use the assessment guidance, page 11) Impact (2) Risk assessment Inherent Control measures (use the assessment guidance, page 11) Score Who might be harmed (Student; those nearby; those in the vicinity; members of the public) Student Impact (1) Risk identification Hazard Potential Consequences Likelihood PART A – Research Location/Area (where visits to organisations/ companies are required) Students should be aware that studying or working offsite is not in itself a dangerous experience but, like every person travelling, you may need to be more aware of your personal safety than when you are at home. While you are offsite: • don’t take any unnecessary risks • seek local advice where necessary, such as local areas to avoid • be alert when travelling alone or at night • consider buildings and persons you are visiting • consider clothing and behaviour, prior to planning research/study trips • be aware of laws, tradition, religious and cultural customs, depending on both your destination and research Students is advised to: • research possibility of adverse weather conditions prior to travel, keeping updated with news coverage and weather forecasts, it may include your destination. • ensure they are adequately prepared for extreme weather conditions, either hot, cold, fog, flood, ice, snow etc… • travel to their destination, only if it is safe to do so Student is advised to: • keep updated with news coverage, it may include your destination/ location • be aware of suspicious behaviour, particularly near public buildings, structures or bridges, also inside buildings at specific entry/exit points, stairwells, hallways or fire escapes • be aware of vehicles parked in suspicious circumstances, possible watching of buildings or structures, also slow moving vehicles, near public buildings, structures or bridges • Know how to react 39 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) 1. Fire, Incident, Accident at destination with no available contact information and/or communication Damage to belongings, injury, death. University unable to establish student’s safety and health. Student, others 2. Loss or theft of passport, driving licence, money, belongings Stress, isolation, inconvenience and financial loss due to loss, theft or fraud Student 3. Travelling without insurance details. Unable to make contact with the University’s Insurance Office/University’s insurers. Unable to get medical treatment, resulting in the worsening of medical conditions/injuries Student (For Specific queries contact: insure@soton.ac. uk 023 8059 2417 or 023 8059 4790) Likelihood Score (3) Risk management Residual Further controls (use the assessment guidance, page 11) Impact (2) Risk assessment Inherent Control measures (use the assessment guidance, page 11) Score Who might be harmed (Student; those nearby; those in the vicinity; members of the public) Impact (1) Risk identification Hazard Potential Consequences Likelihood PART B – Emergency Preparedness Student will: • adhere to health and safety information provided by the designated organisation(s), to include the location of fire exits/routes and assembly points at both the workplace and accommodation visited and any further instructions provided. • lodge their itinerary and contact details with their academic tutor/supervisor Student is advised: • to keep important documents/items on hand, or secured, if possible • to use secure storage in accommodation, do not leave valuables on display, carry documents, cards or cash discreetly; carry bags across body rather than on shoulder • to have back-up arrangements and contact number in case of theft • to have access to a copy of passport/driving licence, as proof of identity, and an appropriate credit card that can be used to pay for expenses if money is lost or stolen • to have access to emergency numbers to cancel lost or stolen cards and make arrangements to obtain alternative monies Prior to departure, student should: • research whether the trip is covered for the area(s) visited and the activities that are undertaken, (planned and un-planned). • have access to and understand, the cover provided under the University’s travel insurance details throughout the trip. (overnight stays and longer) • have access to and understand the cover provided under the University’s Liability insurance details for single day trips. 40 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) 1. Travel accident/ incident when commuting in own or hired vehicle, bicycle or walking Accident/Incident, resulting injury to self, loss of property or worse Student, members of the public 2. Travel and commuting using public transport Accident/Incident, resulting injury to self, loss of property or worse Student, members of the public Likelihood Score (3) Risk management Residual Further controls (use the assessment guidance, page 11) Impact (2) Risk assessment Inherent Control measures (use the assessment guidance, page 11) Score Who might be harmed (user; those nearby; those in the vicinity; members of the public) Impact (1) Risk identification Hazard Potential Consequences Likelihood PART C – Travel/Transport required for research Student will • be aware of and consider weather conditions, laws, rules and road safety, prior to travelling If using own or hired form of transport at any stage: • driving licence must be valid and in date and suitable for the vehicle being used and ensure own cars, scooters or motorbikes are fit for purpose, roadworthy with adequate and valid insurance cover, the same will apply to the hiring of scooters and motorbikes, however this should be avoided if possible. Ensure bicycles are roadworthy • wear protective clothing and equipment including crash helmets and good working lights - visibility to be of utmost importance • must be fully aware of other road users when using a bicycle, and remain vigilant of vehicles and use marked crossings where possible when walking Student is advised to: • be aware that coach and rail stations are often in less reputable areas of cities/towns • plan journey from arrival point using pre-booked coach/taxi or recognised public transport; avoid travelling alone if possible • travel in occupied parts of carriages or buses; arrange to arrive in daylight if possible – if after dark then arrange to be met and avoid walking alone • keep important documents/items hidden and out of sight when travelling • always carry a mobile phone to make calls to friends, family or emergency services if necessary 41 MANG6550 Dissertation (DSIE) Handbook 2021/22 (Part 2) Likelihood 3. Travelling alone or to unknown areas for research Getting lost or stuck, working remotely and unable to ask for help Student Student is advised to: • plan trips in advance, always travel during the day and check in with the organisation/accommodation when arriving and leaving. • have a contact number at the organisation/accommodation for further assistance • take a physical map and phone for directions • avoid taking lone trips wherever possible • check government and local advice on travel ... Purchase answer to see full attachment

  
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