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Hello attached is my article

https://www.jstor.org/stable/41103940?origin=JSTOR…

READING ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT
Professor Sherry C.M. Lindquist
GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Read and analyze a scholarly article or book chapter that meets
the criteria listed on the Topic Selection Questionnaire (TSQ).
Instructions: Download this Assignment from Western Online and use the template for your
typed, finished assignment. DON’T MAKE THIS INTO A FORMAL PAPER; JUST PROVIDE
EXPLANATIONS IN ORDER AS INSTRUCTED. Use the headings; you can skip or delete the
instructions, explanations, tips, and examples. Make sure you provide a response where you
find blue highlighting/dotted underline.
Template for your Assignment:
1. Citation and Approval ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
Provide a full bibliographic reference for your article/chapter (see the TSQ PowerPoint): ….. 2
Note here how the article was approved…………………………………………………………………………. 2
2. Summarizing Statements: ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 2
3. Author’s organizational strategy: ………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
4. Write a Summary of the whole article in your own words: ……………………………………………….. 3
5. Assess the author’s use of evidence: ………………………………………………………………………………. 4
6. Your evaluation:………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5
7. Generate a potential research question: …………………………………………………………………………. 5
8. Come up with some key words and research themes relevant to the topic of your article. …….. 7
9. Rethink, revise, explain your revision …………………………………………………………………………… 7
EXPLANATION OF EACH SECTION:
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1. Citation and Approval
Provide a full bibliographic reference for your article/chapter (see the TSQ PowerPoint) and note
here how the article was approved (online feedback, email, etc.):
2. Summarizing Statements:
Instructions: Quote from 2-4 passages where you think the author is stating his or her main
argument (provide page numbers) and *star the one you think is most likely the author’s main
thesis statement.
Tips:
•
•
For summarizing statements, look in the introduction, conclusion and abstract (if there is
one). Look at the beginnings and ends of major sections.
Be aware that there is a difference between a topic statement and a thesis statement (some
articles have both):
A topic statement identifies the main topic of the article. A thesis statement identifies
what the author is trying to prove. Although the thesis statement is probably summarized
in the abstract (if there is one), find the one in the actual text of the article. Sometimes the
title of the article will help you identify the author’s argument. Sometimes an author will
pose a series of questions at the beginning in lieu of a topic statement and summarize the
article’s conclusions at the end.
3. Author’s organizational strategy:
Instructions: Convey the author’s organizational strategy by noting how the author divides their
work into sections. Briefly summarize each section. Do not quote in this section—put in your
own words. This is normally the longest part of the assignment.
Further explanation:
•
•
If the author has headings: list the headings and briefly summarize the argument/main
point of each section.
If the author does not have headings: you must take the step of figuring out how the piece
breaks down into sections. Give each section a descriptive heading and briefly summarize
the argument/main point of each section. Do NOT analyze at the micro level (paragraph
by paragraph). Come up with a few major sections and summarize them.
Tips:
•
Summaries should include specifics: pretend as though your summaries will be used to
help people find key words to use in database searches.
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Sometimes organizational divisions are indicated by graphics (extra spaces, dots, or
symbols).
Examples and discussion:
Both of these summaries describe the same section of the same article. Which do you think is
better and why?
“The author goes into depth talking about how the Tale of Genji is such a significant canon for
Japanese art and what the album depicts as far as Japanese culture, government and religion. This
section talks about how the album was constructed and how the calligraphy it depicts a narrative
in the album.”
“Now attributed to the famed Tosa Mitsunobu, the album form, calligraphy, and painting style of
the recently rediscovered Harvard Genji album are revealing about the taste and aspirations both
of the aristocracy and the rising warrior class who patronized such objects at the imperial court in
Kyoto during the Muromachi period.”
Discussion: The first summary identifies the basic topic of the section, but it is rather vague. The
second summary gives many more specifics about the who, what, when, and why—and in about
the same number of words.
4. Write a Summary of the whole article in your own words (2-4 sentences):
Instruction: Summarize the author’s main argument(s) in your own words (2-4 sentences). Do
not quote from the author or closely paraphrase his/her summarizing statements.
Further Explanation: It’s a trick to be able to briefly summarize a complicated argument or idea,
and a very important skill that can be used in almost any kind of intellectual work. It is tempting
to make the job easier simply by describing the topic rather than the specific argument and to be
vague rather than specific. If I have approved your article, it has an argument (so do not make the
claim that the article has no argument). What is the author trying to prove?
Student examples and discussion:
Good: In her article, “Predatory Goddesses,” Mary R. Lefkowitz argues against the idea that
abduction scenes of Eros represent the dangers of female sexuality. Instead, Lefkowitz argues
that these scenes are meant to remind viewers that the gods and goddesses are extremely
powerful and that they have the ability to alter human lives.
Good: Serving both ideological and propagandistic purposes, the language of gesture–referring
to all nonverbal communication– in the narrative art of Assyria communicated to the Assyrian
people specificities regarding the characteristics of Assyrian power, particularly dominance over
non-Assyrian people, who were understood to be abnormal, lesser beings.
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Pretty Good: The argument in this work is that despite the assumptions made by previous
historians, the purpose of the creation of the Pantheon was to show Hadrian’s place as a god
among men. Here you get a sense of what is being argued about this specific monument, but it
could be more specific still.
Suggestion for revision: Although previous historians have emphasized the Pantheon’s function
as a temple to all the gods, Joost-Gaugier argues that Hadrian embedded Pythagorean principles
of cosmic order into the design of the building as a way of asserting his exalted place in the
universe: as a god among men.
Not specific enough (bad): “This discusses the argument of the article and reflects on how there
are patterns and customs that we know of that support the argument.” This conveys almost no
information and could be written about almost any scholarly article.
Suggestion for Revision: Funerary objects discovered in Koryo graves clearly show that they
served to forge a relationship with the dead. Burials were inflected by the social class and
religious beliefs of the deceased (e.g. geomantic, Buddhist, Neo-Confucian), these graves
demonstrate a variety of practices: bodies were cremated or interred, placed in both stone
chambers or pit graves. In contrast to later Neo-Confucian burials, there seemed to be no strict
rules about burials in this period.
5. Assess the author’s use of evidence:
Instructions:
•
Explain how the author used a primary source to support their argument. A primary source is
archeological or other kinds of raw data, documents from the time period studied, or works of
art themselves. Follow link for more about identifying primary sources. Provide
page/illustration number.
•
Explain how the author used a secondary source (the work of other modern scholars) to
support their thesis. Provide page/note number.
Examples and discussion:
Good: (primary Source): The author uses two diagrams, Magunus Hundt’s Antropologium (1501)
and Guido de Vigevano’s Anothomia designata per figuras (1345). Pg. 88. In her argument she
explains how the diagrams show that the womb is divided up into six cells, like the inside of that
statue is divided up into six different panels. . . By describing the statue in a more biological way, it
helps argue the relationship between the Madonna and Christ.
Pretty Good (primary source): “Each picture would be a primary source. She uses figures 1 and 2 of
the “Dance of Death” in Lübeck and in Reval to expose the differences in the contextual meanings
and how these slight changes made a difference in how the ‘Dance of Death’ may have been read.”
Good, but I would like to know just a little more about what she says about these works, what the
differences are, and how they might have been read.
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Good (secondary source): “Likewise, Casteret (1934) argued adamantly that although some of the
handprints were of medium size, most were very small hands, smaller than those of the average
person today. Casteret observed that since Paleolithic skeletons are not appreciably smaller in size,
the small handprints might well be those of women or children” (Guthrie 126). This secondary
source was able to support the author’s argument by describing from a different point of view the
same idea that he had about children being much more prevalent than many have described before
him.
Pretty Good (secondary source): “Prado-Vilar uses the work of Erica Cruikshank Dodd (“The image
of the Word: Notes on the Religious Iconography of Islam.”) in conjunction with H. Pérès’ analysis
of poetry to support his ideas of vegetal motifs as symbols of fertility (p.21).” Again, just a little
more is needed. How exactly did the author use the work of these scholars to support them?
6. Your evaluation:
Instructions: Write 1-2 paragraphs commenting on the strengths and/or weaknesses of the article.
Comment on more than one of the following: a particularly well-argued point, something that
inspired you, an illustration of a new way of thinking about the topic, a compelling example, an
inconsistency, an unsupported conclusion, an instance in which the author did not consider a
relevant counter example, an error in logic. Cite specific passages and provide page numbers.
Examples:
Not specific enough: The argument as a whole is very well supported, so no flaws can be seen
in broad assumptions that the author makes without factual support. This was not accompanied
by a discussion of the evidence the author presents and why it is convincing, so I have no idea
why the student thinks the argument is well supported. This language is vague and generic
enough to be applied to another article altogether.
Good: I did notice that a lot of the similarities that he pointed out were between some previous
Assyrian works of art and the Persepolis scene (for example, the idea for the throne leg that he
alleges the Apadana artist came up with on his own even after contemplating the motif of
Assurbanipals’s couch and adjacent table leg). That being said, I wondered if his argument
should have been more inclined to propose that the Persepolis scene was more definitely inspired
by a number of Neo-Assyrian review scenes and not just one particular scene—the one at Til
Barsip. This is especially good because it demonstrates the student’s thoughtful attention to the
works of art discussed in the article.
7. Generate a potential research question:
This section demands creative engagement with what you read. Being able to find inspiration in
what you read (and experience), and to imagine how you can build on it is a valuable skill in any
field.
Instructions:
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•
Come up with one or more interesting questions grounded in your article that could serve
as a starting point for beginning your own research project on a related topic (these are
questions that are not asked or answered by the article). This is an art history class, so
your research question should be about art.
•
Comment on how, if followed up on, your question has the potential to confirm, expand,
revise or refute the author’s argument.
Further Explanation: Do not repeat or rephrase questions that the author of your article already
asked (or perhaps even answered). If you do this, it can lead me to believe that did not read the
article closely enough to know that you are reusing the author’s ideas. Try to ask questions that
might take this research a step further, that will test, expand, or complement it. Ask interpretive
questions. Don’t ask simple factual questions that you can easily look up. Also, if the question
can be answered with “yes” or “no” it is probably not a good research question. If a yes/no
question occurs to you, try to revise it, flesh it out, build on it.
Examples and discussion:
Question: Was turning a bridge into a sort of street (with a row of shops) typical for the late
medieval time period? Answer = yes. This question is not framed in such as way convey why it
might be worth further investigation.
A better question from the same person: What was the purpose of a piazza and why were they
so common? This question involves determining the meaning of public space, which has lots of
implications for urban design and architectural history as well as social and cultural history.
Another possibility: What role did bridges and piazzas play in defining public space and shaping
social interactions in early modern Europe?
The best questions reveal a lively and specific engagement with the ideas in the article and with
the objects it treats.
More examples of good questions from students:
• An interesting point Lewis brings up is that through pottery, art historians have
determined that relationships between fathers and daughters in Athens were not as close
or intimate in comparison to other places, such as Sparta. What kind of proof is there to
back this up? It’d be interesting to make a comparison between pottery from various
places depicting father/daughter relationships.
•
[In her study on the goddess Eros abducting young men] Lefkowitz explains that there
are instances of gods choosing male lovers [on Attic vases], a clear show of
homosexuality. Did goddesses ever choose to abduct female mortals for lovers? Why or
why not might this be?
•
[about an article on Pissarro’s landscapes] Does Pissarro’s use of partiality, obscurity,
and embodiment show in his figure paintings? If so, how? If not, why not?
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•
The sexual nature of these figures is not addressed. The pubic area was often painted, and
they are nude and often depicted with small breasts. This is hardly mentioned except in
reference to Egyptian bride dolls, which these are most likely not. They might have to do
with puberty, fertility, or goddesses, but is there any research into which it is?
8. Come up with some key words and research themes relevant to the topic of your article.
For example, if this were your article: Camille, Michael. “‘For Our Devotion and Pleasure’: The
Sexual Objects of Jean, Duc de Berry,” Art History 24, no. 2 (2001): 169-94.
Possible themes might include: The Très Riches Heures of the Duke of Berry, the Grandes
Heures of the Duke of Berry, the Hours of Jean D’Evreux, the Moralized Bible by the Limbourg
Brothers, The Limbourg Brothers, Books of Hours, social class in late medieval manuscripts,
calendar pages, sexuality in medieval manuscripts; medieval manuscripts and the collecting
impulse, art and political power in medieval manuscripts, representing the human body in
medieval manuscripts, erotic humor in medieval manuscripts, gender in late medieval
manuscripts, etc.
9. Rethink, revise, explain your revision (for the final version only)
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•
•
•
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Remember that all writing can be improved through revision, and the point of this part of the
assignment is to take it to the next level.
Rethink and revise your assignment according to instructor comments on your draft of parts
1-8 of the assignment.
Detail how you revised your assignment in response to instructor comments. List the things
you changed: how you responded to feedback, how you clarified your summary, how you
sharpened your analysis of evidence, what specifics you added to your explanations, how you
rethought one of your questions.
When grading this, the first thing I do is to read my comments on your draft and then read
your explanation of how you incorporated them.
If you don’t turn in both a serious draft and a serious revision, it is almost impossible to
get higher than a “C” on the assignment.
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