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Topic: Learning Objectives

Construct a discussion post that identifies how you feel the learning objectives were met, supported with examples of course materials and course assignments.

For any course objectives you feel were not met during the course, please provide a discussion of why they were not met.

Here are the course learning objectives for your review:

Course Objectives:

MN660-1:

Examine basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology mechanisms with correlation to clinical psychiatric mental health disorders and diseases, trauma and injury, and genetic, developmental, or substance induced disorders in individuals across the lifespan.

MN660-2:

Integrate neurobiology, pathophysiology, and population health in assessment, diagnosis, and management of individuals, groups, and families across the lifespan with acute, chronic, and complex mental health disorders.

MN660-3:

Formulate the use of evidence-based best practices related to pharmacological, non-pharmacological, and complementary therapeutic treatment plans for individuals with acute, episodic, chronic, and complex mental health disorders.

MN660-4:

Appraise the role of the PMHNP to integrate legal, ethical, and evidence-based practices for prescribing and managing psychotropic therapies for individuals across the lifespan with acute, chronic, and complex mental health disorders.

MN660-5:

Evaluate professional collaborations for advocacy, policy development, healthcare promotion and disease prevention, safety, and the management of care for individuals across the lifespan with acute, chronic, and complex mental health disorders.

Provide evidence (citations and references) to support your statements and opinions.

All references and citations should be in APA format where appropriate.

Unit 1 Reading and Resources
Textbook
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapters – 1
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapter – 1-2
Resources
There are several video lectures in unit one for you to watch listed below. The majority should
be a review from your Anatomy and Physiology courses however, they should not be skipped
over. This knowledge is all foundational to your clinical practice as a PMHNP. The estimated
time to complete watching all recording is approximately an hour and a half. The
recommendation if for you to watch 1-3 a day to have them all reviewed before the end of the
week, while still allowing time for you to complete assignments and study the unit’s your quiz.
Watch: Neuroanatomy made ridiculously easy.

Estimated time to complete: 27:43
Watch: Four Lobes of the Brain

Estimated time to complete: 7:42
Watch: The Limbic System

Estimated time to complete: 6:32
Watch: Thalamus, Hypothalamus, and Epithalamus Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 9:45
Watch: Basal Ganglia Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 9:20
Watch: Internal Capsule

Estimated time to complete: 3:52
Watch: Cerebellum and Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 8:50
Watch: Brainstem (Midbrain, Pons, and Medulla) Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 11:38
The Anatomy of the Brain Link to Infographic
Watch: Introduction and Neurotransmitters

Estimated time to complete: 17 minutes
(Image Retrieved from: https://www.compoundchem.com/2015/07/30/neurotransmitters/ )
Throughout the PMHNP program (and clinical practice) everything you learn will come back to
this foundation!
Unit 2 Reading and Resources
Textbook
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapters – 2-3
Resources. (same as unit one)
This is the same list of resources for Unit 1. Watch any videos that you have not yet reviewed
from unit one.
There are several video lectures in unit one-two for you to watch listed below. The majority
should be a review from your Anatomy and Physiology courses however, they should not be
skipped over. This knowledge is all foundational to your clinical practice as a PMHNP. The
estimated time to complete watching all recording is approximately an hour and a half. The
recommendation if for you to watch 1-3 a day to have them all reviewed before the end of the
week, while still allowing time for you to complete assignments and study the unit’s your quiz.
Watch: Neuroanatomy made ridiculously easy.

Estimated time to complete: 27:43
Watch: Four Lobes of the Brain

Estimated time to complete: 7:42
Watch: The Limbic System

Estimated time to complete: 6:32
Watch: Thalamus, Hypothalamus, and Epithalamus Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 9:45
Watch: Basal Ganglia Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 9:20
Watch: Internal Capsule

Estimated time to complete: 3:52
Watch: Cerebellum and Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 8:50
Watch: Brainstem (Midbrain, Pons, and Medulla) Mnemonics

Estimated time to complete: 11:38
Watch: Introduction and Neurotransmitters

Estimated time to complete: 17 minutes
Unit 3 Reading and Resources
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan pages 87-122
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapters – 4 & 5
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform
•
Chapter – 4
Watch: Brief Introduction to Psychosis

Estimated Time to Complete: 9:42
Watch: Schizophrenia – causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment & pathology

Estimated Time to Complete: 8:14
Watch: Schizophrenia Simulation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pr8IyNGAqlw
Estimated Time to Complete: 6:26
Watch: Antipsychotics

Estimated Time to Complete: 23 minutes
Understanding Schizophrenia Infographic Link
Unit 4 Reading and Resources
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
•
Scan pages 123 through 188
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapters – 6 & 8
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapter – 5
Resources
Watch: Bipolar disorder (depression & mania) – causes, symptoms, treatment & pathology

Estimate time to complete: 6:54
Watch: Mood Stabilizers and Anxiolytics

Please stop the video at 13:47.
Estimated Time to Complete: 14 minutes
Bipolar Disorder Infographic Link
Unit 5 Reading and Resources
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
•
Scan pages 132-188
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapters – 6 & 7
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapters – 3
Clinical depression – major, post-partum, atypical, melancholic, persistent

Estimated time to complete: 10:35
Watch: Antidepressants

Estimated time to complete: 21 minutes
Mental Health Illness Prevalence Infographic Link
Unit 6 Reading and Resources
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
•
Scan pages 189-307
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapters – 9
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapters – 6
Watch: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) – causes, symptoms & treatment

Estimated time to complete: 5:32
Watch: Classification mnemonics of ANTI-ANXIETY DRUGs

Estimated time to complete: 1:00
Watch: Mood Stabilizers and Anxiolytics

Estimated time to complete: 6:87
*** Start at 13:46
Mental Health Illness Prevalence Infographic Link
Unit 7 Reading and Resources
Elderly and the Geriatrics Period:
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan pages 591 through 644
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapter 13 pages 420-443
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapter 9
Anxiety, depression, addition and dementia, and other psychiatric mental health issues are NOT
a typical measure of aging. Again, these are NOT a typical measure of aging and should never
be considered as so. When left untreated, they can create chronic illness, extreme fatigue, and
even end in suicide. Statistics show that one in four older adults of the elderly and geriatric
population will experience some psychiatric mental disorder such as anxiety, depression, and
dementia during their lifetime. This number is expected to double to 15 million by 2030 (NCOA,
2020).
These statistics are astounding and. This is why primary care is an essential part of treatment
for this population and the mental health issues they face. The PMHNP must work closely with
primary care providers for best outcomes of patients. This stage in life is unique because it is
often a time of reflection. Reflection of one’s past, which may include joy, regret, and other
emotions that can contribute to psychiatric mental health issues. It is also a stage in life where
transitions are often occurring and creating a constant changing environment. These changes
could include the loss of loved ones; friends and family, change of living situations, loss of ability
to live independently, increasing health problems requiring frequent health care visits and
medication, etc… You can see how the combination of many of these issues can leave the
elderly and geriatric population with a need for psychiatric mental healthcare interventions.
Remember that psychiatric mental health care should always start with the least invasive and
strive to prevent polypharmacy when able. Consider aiding the client to find community
engagement activities to prevent isolation, connect them with a therapist that specializes in this
population, and allow the patient and family to be a part of the treatment planning. Then if
criteria is met for diagnosis and psychotropic treatments needed, start low and move slow in
prescribing. Multiple factors affect metabolism and renal/liver clearance of medications in this
population.
Depression in the Elderly Infographic Link
Review the information below related to caring for this population in relation to their mental
health.
Read the following articles:
•
Social Isolation and Loneliness in Older Adults
•
Differentiating Between Depressions, Delirium, and Dementia in the Elderly
•
Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Dementia
•
The Mass Psychotropic Drugging of the Elderly
Watch:
Depression in Older People
Estimated Time to Complete: 6:31
Watch:
Delirium
Estimated Time to Complete: 7:38
Perinatal Period:
Postpartum depression should be approached as treating any other client, but also from a
different perspective – that the postpartum period is a very vulnerable period for a woman, in
terms of environment, social, emotional, mental, physical, specific hormonal changes, and so
on. It is estimated that 1 in 5 women will suffer from a mental health issue during the perinatal
period. This covers pregnancy, and postpartum for the first year. For this reason, postpartum
depression (PPD) has now been grouped into perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs).
The most important piece of care for this population is to assess and screen often
throughout. This means during pregnancy and the entire first year after pregnancy and
continued through lactation.
Current Screening Recommendations: Tools and Timeline for PMADs
Remember to always inquire about support systems for mothers with young children that go
beyond supporting mother but can also assist with childcare. In our current society, the mother
is still the primary caretaker in a large percentage of our population. Research shows that
children under the age of 5 can experience great trauma from mothers’ experiences of
psychiatric mental health illnesses. Consider collaboration with early intervention
opportunities and any other that can assist families with additional relief during this time of a
mother’s recovery.
As with other clients, have a safety plan in place, assist the client with collaboration methods in
discovering good coping skills that work for them and always acknowledge that the current
feelings are valid but that this is a season. With behavior change and sometimes medication,
the situation will get better. Also, do not discount the power of aiding clients to simply organize
and plan a day or week. Block scheduling of their time can help automate some activities to
ease their minds workload and allow more energy for recovery.
The Blue Dot Project
Perinatal Mental Illness Infographic Link through Better Beginnings FL
Read the following article:
• Pharmacological Treatment of Postpartum Depression
• Postpartum Support International (provider hotline to consult on medication options and
tx)
•
•
•
MCPAP Provider Toolkit for Moms (algorithms for assessment and medication choices
for tx)
Screening for postpartum depression
Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed and Hale’s) (medication database app No link
needed
Watch:
Postpartum Depression
Estimated Time to Complete: 2:54
Pediatrics and Adolescents Period:
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan p. 30-86 and p. 461-480
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapter 12 pages 471-502
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapter 8
Psychiatric mental health disorders among the pediatric and adolescent population are
explained as serious changes in the way the child or teen typically behaves, learns, or copes as
well as displays their emotions which can create issues of distress and difficulties progressing
through the day. Among the more common psychiatric mental health disorders that can be
diagnosed in children and teens are depression, anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
(ADHD), and behavior disorders.
This population is seen often in primary care related to preventative care measures such as
immunizations or common childhood illnesses. This is why approaching mental health care of
this population is so essential to the provider’s role. This may be the only encounter that allows
for proper screening and assessment of these issues to establish treatment.
See statistics here:
Pediatric and Adolescent Mental Health Statistics
Common Sx and Tx for Pediatric and Adolescent Mental Health Issues
Mental Health Facts Children and Teens Infographic Link
Review the following webinars and lectures from American Academy of Pediatrics related to
treating pediatric and adolescents with mental health concerns.
Read the following articles:
• Autism Spectrum Disorder
• Autism Spectrum Disorder Fact Sheet
• ADHD Guidelines AAP
• ADHD Medication Treatment Algorithm
• Treatment of Pediatric Depression and Anxiety
• Treatment of Adolescent Depression and Anxiety
LGBTQ Population:
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan pages 451-459
The National Alliance on Mental Illness offers this content and statistics related to mental health
of the LGBTQ community.
We know that every person has different experiences in life that can contribute to mental
illness. Statistics show that:
•
•
•
•
LGB adults are more than twice as likely as heterosexual adults to experience a mental
health condition
LGBTQ people are at a higher risk than the general population for suicidal thoughts and
suicide attempts
High school students who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual are almost five times as
likely to attempt suicide compared to their heterosexual peers
48% of all transgender adults report that they have considered suicide in the past 12
months, compared to 4% of the overall US population. (NAMI, 2020)
National Alliance on Mental Illness. (2020). LGBTQ. Retrieved from: https://www.nami.org/findsupport/lgbtq
LGBTQI Mental illness Statistics
BIPOP & LGBTQI* Mental Illness Infographic
Read the following article that discusses specific challenges surrounding mental health care for
the LGBTQ community.
LGBTQ Population
• Mental Health Care for LGBTQ
• Transgender Medication Considerations
Immigrants and Migrant Workers Population:
Immigrants and migrant workers experience a variety of aspects that can have effects for their
psychiatric mental health, including having to navigate a new and unacquainted culture and
physical environment, as well as the stress of separation from their family members, country of
origin, and home culture. Tensions and trauma involved in the extensive immigration experience
can directly correlate with psychiatric mental health issues, including anxiety, depression,
substance abuse, PTSD and more. When this population presents for primary care it is
essential to screen, assess, and define a treatment plan that also addresses these mental
health issues. This may also be their only contact with option to assist them with these
needs. This again is an important collaboration effort for the psychiatric mental health provider
with primary care.
Resources specific to this population:
Mental Health Challenges in Immigrant Communities
Minorities:
Black, Indigenous, and People of Color face specific challenges in relation to histories of racism
and females face specific cultural challenges of historical sexism. Our nation has made many
strides toward equality. However, we must recognize that generational practices are deeply
engrained into culture. We must seek cultural competence to understand all aspects of an
individual’s situation when providing treatment.
These same prejudices can be created toward any person though regardless of gender, sex,
race, color, etc…
BIPOP & LGBTQI* Mental Illness Infographic
Ethnicity Considerations in Prescribing:
Ruiz P. (2007). The role of ethnicity in psychopharmacology. International psychiatry : bulletin of
the Board of International Affairs of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, 4(3), 55–56.
Unit 8 Reading and Resources
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan p. 30-86 and p. 461-480.
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
•
Chapter 10 pages 420-443
Chapter 14 – pages 537 – 572
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapter 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
Chronic Pain
As you are aware, pain alerts our bodies to injury or illness. This is often characterized by
acute, episodic occurrences. However, when pain is chronic, it occurs regularly for a greater
than 12 weeks timespan. This is not only physically exhausting for those experiencing this but
mentally and emotionally as well.
For these reasons pain disorders are now included in the DSM5 with specific criteria and listed
as Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders. The shared features of this disorders in this
category is that individuals have “somatic (distinct from the mind meaning body) symptoms
associated with significant distress and impairment. (DSM-5)”
Chronic Pain: A Cycle of Stress and Pain Infographic Link
The infographic points to additional issues that chronic pain can lead to that we have covered in
previous modules to include chronic fatigue, depression, anxiety, insomnia, trauma and then
those covered in this unit; substance use disorders. What creates these issues with acute pain
that cause them to become chronic pain. The obvious conclusion is that some illnesses or
injuries are not managed or are permanent changes to the body. The body must have time to
adapt to the imbalances that have occurred. At times other environmental, emotional, mental,
and physical issues prevent the body from stabilizing. This phenomenon can be discussed in
relation to the Gate Theory of Pain.
Let’s first review the Gate Control Theory of Pain.
Read the article for the history of the Gate Theory:
Constructing and Deconstructing the Gate Theory of Pain
Watch the video:
Gate Control Theory of Pain
Estimated Time to Complete: 5:08
A large portion of pain management treatments in the past have focused on opioids for pain
control. When beginning opioid therapy for chronic pain, providers must prescribe immediaterelease opioids in place of extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioids. When initiating
treatment with opioids, providers should prescribe the lowest effective dosage. Longterm opioid use often begins with treatment of acute pain so consider any, and all other options
before beginning the cascade effect of desensitization of the pain response and building of
tolerance to opioids.
Now let’s review opioids.
Opioids are a class of substances and drugs that include:
•
illegal heroin
and include those available legally by prescription such as:
• synthetic opioids; fentanyl
and pain relievers such as:
• oxycodone (OxyContin)
• hydrocodone (Vicodin)
• codeine
• morphine
• and many others.
Opioid Safety Infographic Link
Watch the videos for a review of mechanisms of action and discussion of addiction and abuse
potential.
Opioids Part 1 Mechanism of Action
Estimated Time to Complete: 11:52
Opioids Part 2: Addiction and Abuse
Estimated Time to Complete: 16:42
The following links discuss the most up-to date prescribing guidelines as of January
2020. These guidelines, however, are constantly being reviewed and are updated regularly
every few years and were last updated in 2018.
2018 CDC Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain (1 hour module, 1 CEU)
Prescribing Guidelines
Tapering Guidelines
Additional Recommended Resources:
Patient Agreement for Opioid Use Template update name
Patient Consent for Opioid Therapy Template
End the Epidemic: Opioid Taskforce Resources
Safe Opioid Prescribing
Clinical Gem: Rate pain at every visit regardless of chief complaint, (any pain anywhere, rate 010.). Avoid polypharmacy as much as possible. Least invasive approach to efficacy and
manageable rates of pain by patient rating. Start with lowest effective dosing and immediate
release when using opioids. Educate patient and create treatment plan with consent for patient
to sign for clear expectations.
With the rise in the opioid epidemic, (1 as practitioners, we must find new ways to treat chronic
pain to avoid abuse potential. Let’s discuss substance use disorders and specific treatments for
them as a whole.
Opioid Epidemic by Numbers Infographic Link
Substance Use Disorders
Substance use disorders and addiction is a critical issue in our society today as we all well
know. As a provider, you will interact with this population more frequently than other specialty
providers at times due to the usual nature of addictions, chronic pain, and mental health
disorders as comorbidities or dual-diagnoses. Primary care is often the first place these patients
will reach out to.
Substance Use Disorders are wide-spread in terms of population age, gender, economic status,
and geographical locations. However, the approach to treatment is often the same and begins
with prevention and education followed by through assessments.
SAMHSA Substance Use Disorder Infographics Link (multiple)
First let’s review pathophysiology for better understanding:
Recall your neurobiology and pathophysiology related to the brain, neurotransmitter functions,
and reward center. Now consider that regardless of the TYPE of substance used and addiction
they all have one collective thread; that is that the drugs of abuse alter the mesolimbic system
aka the reward pathway.
Rewards Pathway in Brain Review (Run Time 8:25)
Current statistics for substance misuse and abuse are staggering. Please review the
information on the SAMHSA website related to misuse and abuse of Alcohol, Tobacco, Opioids,
Marijuana, Methamphetamines, Cocaine, Kratom. Each section has a list of links and resources
to review these substances and their statistics specifically.
SAMHSA Drug Misuse and Abuse Statistics and Links
Specific Substance Use Disorders Overviews Recommended Videos:
Alcoholism
Estimated Time to Complete: 14:45
Cocaine
Estimated Time to Complete: 12:01
Tobacco
Estimated Time to Complete: 11:06
Opioids
13:59
Cannabis/Marijuana
12:08
Medicated Assisted Treatment (MAT)
According to SAMHSA: MAT Effectiveness
In 2013, an estimated 1.8 million people had an opioid use disorder related to prescription pain
relievers, and about 517,000 had an opioid use disorder related to heroin use. MAT has proved
to be clinically effective and to significantly reduce the need for inpatient detoxification services
for these individuals. MAT provides a more comprehensive, individually tailored program of
medication and behavioral therapy. MAT also includes support services that address the needs
of most patients.
The ultimate goal of MAT is full recovery, including the ability to live a self-directed life. This
treatment approach has been shown to:
•
•
•
•
•
Improve patient survival
Increase retention in treatment
Decrease illicit opiate use and other criminal activity among people with substance use
disorders
Increase patients’ ability to gain and maintain employment
Improve birth outcomes among women who have substance use disorders and are
pregnant (SAMHSA, 2020)
Opioid Use Disorder MAT Medications:
• Methadone
• Buprenorphine
• Naltrexone
Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder Link
Alcohol Use Disorder MAT Medications:
• Disulfiram
• Acamprosate
• Naltrexone
2018 APA Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment Guidelines Summary
Tobacco Use Disorder MAT Medications:
• Bupropion
• Varenicline
• Nicotine replacement therapy
Tobaccos Use Disorder Treatment
Vaping Use Disorder:
•
E-cigarette and Vaping Lung Injury Treatment Guidelines
•
Clinicians Address Youth Vaping
***Training for MAT: You will be completing the MAT training in this PMHNP program in a later
course.
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan p. 329-360
Hilbert, A., Hoek, H. W., & Schmidt, R. (2017). Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating
disorders: international comparison. Current opinion in psychiatry, 30(6), 423–437.
Commonly Used Drugs and Treatment Information Charts:
https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/Commonly-Used-DrugsCharts_final_June_2020_optimized.pdf
https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/nida_commonlyuseddrugs_final_printready.pdf
Withdrawal Sx Chart
https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/nida_commonlyabused_withdrawalsymptoms_100
62017-508-1.pdf
Watch: Recreational Depressants

Estimated Time to Complete: 15 minutes
Recreational Stimulants

Estimated Time to Complete: 13 minutes
Hallucinogens

Estimated Time to Complete: 12 minutes
Unit 9 Reading and Resources
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan p. 709-714
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapter 14 – pages 537 – 572
Heldt, J. P., MD. (2017). Memorable psychopharmacology. Create Space Independent
Publishing Platform.
•
Chapter 14 & 15
Read the following articles related:
Crisis Management:
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) Guidelines
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome
Serotonin Syndrome
Adverse Reactions:
Evaluating and Managing Side Effects of Psychiatric Medications ppt Managing Common Adverse Reactions in Psychiatric Mental Health Care
Stroup, T. S., & Gray, N. (2018). Management of common adverse effects of antipsychotic
medications. World psychiatry: official journal of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), 17(3),
341–356. https://doi.org/10.1002/wps.20567
Complimentary, Alterative, Integrative and Functional Medicine:
Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Psychiatric Mental Health Care
Supplements:
Natural Supplements for Mental Health Overview of Most Used
Managing Stress with Magnesium (Run Time 2:11)
Light Therapy (this can be prescribed)
According to the Mayo Clinic there are three key elements for effectiveness when using
light therapy to replicate sunlight:
Light therapy is most effective when you have the proper combination of light intensity, duration
and timing.
∙
∙
∙
Intensity. The intensity of the light box is recorded in lux, which is a measure of the amount of
light you receive. For SAD, the typical recommendation is to use a 10,000-lux light box at a
distance of about 16 to 24 inches (41 to 61 centimeters) from your face.
Duration. With a 10,000-lux light box, light therapy typically involves daily sessions of about
20 to 30 minutes. But a lower-intensity light box, such as 2,500 lux, may require longer
sessions. Check the manufacturer’s guidelines and follow your doctor’s instructions. He or she
may suggest you start with shorter sessions and gradually increase the time.
Timing. For most people, light therapy is most effective when it’s done early in the morning,
after you first wake up. Your doctor can help you determine the light therapy schedule that
works best. (Mayo Clinic: https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/light-therapy/about/pac20384604)
Functional & Integrative Medicine in Psychiatric Mental Health Care
Unit 10 Reading and Resources
Textbook
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders
(5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
• Scan p. 361-422
Stahl, S. M. (2013). Stahl’s essential psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific basis and practical
applications (4th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
•
Chapter 11 – pages 444 – 470
Sleep Disorders & Insomnia
The causes, symptoms and severity of insomnia vary from patient to patient Insomnia may
include:
∙ Difficulty falling asleep
∙ Difficulty staying asleep throughout the night
∙ Waking up too early in the morning
∙ Waking multiple times through a specific period
Insomnia incorporates both a sleep disturbance and daytime functioning disturbances. The
effects of insomnia can negatively impact almost every facet of life. Several research studies
show that insomnia negatively affects work performance, impairs decision-making and can
damage relationships. In most cases, people with insomnia report a worsening of symptoms
and effects over time.
As with any other health related issue, insomnia can be assessed, diagnosed, and managed
from a cooperative approach between patient and primary care provider.
Read the following factsheet and articles:
Treatment of Insomnia with Comorbid Mental Illness, Can’t Sleep? Issues of Being an
Insomniac [PDF]
American Academy of Sleep Medicine Factsheet
Vitamin D and Melatonin for Insomnia
Watch the following informational Video (s):
Insomnia (Run time 4:46)
Insomnia Infographic Link
Watch – Pharmacology of sleep disorder management
Final Thoughts: Self-Care for the Provider
Tips sheet: This tip sheet for self-care was written by the American Psychiatric Nurses
Association organization specifically for psychiatric nurses. However, this applies to ALL
providers in healthcare. Self-care is essential so that you can be healthy to continue to provide
services for others to be healthy. PLEASE CARE for YOURSELF!!!
APNA Self Care Tip Sheet
Self Care

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