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9/07/2022
Outline
Week 2 lecture
Stakeholder Engagement
Reflecting on your career planning
workbook
Why engage with stakeholders?
Principles of stakeholder
engagement
Levels of engagement
HSH212 Professional Practice T2
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“I still don’t know what I want to be when I grow up” Claudia Strugnell
Position descriptions
Reflecting on
your Career
Planning
Workbook
Community Engagement Officer – Victorian Public Tenants
Association
Tackling Indigenous Smoking Coordinator– Wurli‐Wurlinjang Health
Service
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https://www.smh.com.au/opinion/the‐future‐of‐work‐17‐jobs‐and‐five‐different‐careers‐20170728‐gxko39.html
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What is a
stakeholder?
Any individual, group or institution that:
Who are the Stakeholders?
• School children
has an interest (or stake) in a project
• Parents/guardians
• Principals
is affected by a project in a positive or
negative
way, or
• Teachers/School
staff/Crossing
supervisor(s)
whoresidents
are critical to the success of a project
• Local community
• Local Council
• Police
• Can you think of any others?
Partnerships are the collaborative relationships we develop with our stakeholders.
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9/07/2022
Stakeholder engagement is…
Why engage with stakeholders?
It enables organisations to develop and deliver:
…the meaningful and purposeful involvement in the process of decision‐making by
people or groups who have a vested interest in the health issue, in the decisions made
and/or its outcomes
better policies
better programs
The opportunity for people to have a say on issues that matter to them is fundamental
to the democratic process.
better services
It is ‘a way to bridge the gap between people and the services that we provide and the
policies that we deliver’
Aboriginal Policy & Stakeholder Engagement Branch October 2012
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Renton (2011)
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Continuum of Health Promotion Practice
Stereotypical Examples
Decide
Announce
Announce
What might be some of the benefits/ fallouts
from this approach?
Defend
Discuss
Decide
What might be some benefits/
fallouts of this approach?
Source: Northern Territory Health Promotion Framework. Department of Health Darwin, 2013
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HP Action Areas
Principles of stakeholder engagement
Purposeful We begin every engagement with a clear understanding of what we want to achieve
WHO’s Ottawa Charter and the Jakarta Declaration identified 10 key action areas for health promotion:
1.Build healthy public policy.
Inclusive We identify relevant stakeholders and make it easy for them to engage
2.Create supportive environments.
3.Strengthen community action.
4.Develop personal skills.
5.Reorient health services towards primary health care.
6.Promote social responsibility for health.
7.Increase investments for health development to address social inequities leading to poor health.
8.Consolidate and expand partnerships for health.
9.Strengthen communities and increase community capacity to empower the individual.
Timely We involve stakeholders from the start and agree on when and how to engage
POLICY
ADVOCACY
COLLABORATION
CROSS‐SECTOR
ENGAGEMENT
Transparent We are open and honest in our engagement and set clear expectations
10.Secure an infrastructure for health promotion.
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Respectful We acknowledge and respect the expertise, perspective, and needs of stakeholders
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9/07/2022
Purposeful We begin every engagement with a clear understanding of what we want to achieve
Inclusive We identify relevant stakeholders and make it easy for them to engage
• We identify and enable the participation of those people and organisations who contribute to,
influence, or are affected by our work. This includes those that may be harder to reach for
reasons such as language, culture, age or mobility.
• While our engagement will be driven by our strategic priorities, we must be aware of our
stakeholders’ objectives, environment, expertise and level of influence.
• When we know why we need to engage and we agree on what success looks like, it is easier to
conduct focused and meaningful engagement.
• We provide our stakeholders with the information they need to participate in a meaningful way
• By planning our communication and managing expectations, we aim to build lasting goodwill with
stakeholders participating in the process and develop an understanding about their capacity to
engage.
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Timely We involve stakeholders from the start and agree on when and how to engage
Transparent We are open and honest in our engagement and set clear expectations
• We will clearly identify and explain the engagement process, and negotiate with
stakeholders, where possible, as to timelines.
• We will provide information so stakeholders can participate in a meaningful way and will foster
a culture of sharing ideas.
• This includes meeting schedules, and response times for information requests or feedback.
• We will clearly identify and explain the engagement process, the role of stakeholders in the
engagement process, and communicate how their input will inform the project.
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Respectful We acknowledge and respect the expertise, perspective, and needs of stakeholders
Levels of engagement
• We understand that engagement is a two‐way process. We take care to be open to alternative
views and to listen as well as speak.
• We respect our stakeholders’ expertise and appreciate the benefits of mutual learning.
• We recognise the different communication needs and preferences of stakeholders and endeavour
to meet these wherever possible.
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9/07/2022
Engaging in the real world ‐ examples
Planning
Capacity Building
Networking, partnering, collaborating
Conducting needs assessments
stakeholder
engagement
Evaluating
Disseminating findings and key messages
Stakeholder Engagement Framework Department of Education
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The Chasm diffusion model
Common mistakes
• Making a decision that impacts your stakeholders, without gaining their opinion.
• Failing to make stakeholder engagement a top priority.
• Looking at the issue through your eyes.
HP
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H
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S
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• Allowing the vocal few to dominate
• Believing that what’s said the most, is also most important.
• Communication ‐ too much, too little, too promotional, too simplistic, and not disseminated in a
way that will reach the intended audiences.
(McLachlan, 2014)
Source: https://thinkinsights.net/strategy/crossing‐the‐chasm/
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Preparation for next week
There are a few important readings you will need to complete over for next week. These will help you to get a
better understanding of capacity building and will assist you with the field visit (AT1) and grant application (AT2).
• Victorian Foundation for Survivors of Torture
(Foundation House) 2017. A Framework for
community capacity building.
• Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade,
Developing local capacity and effective
partnerships.
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7/30/2022
Lecture 5
Community engagement
HSH212 Professional Practice
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https://iap2.org.au/covid‐19/
https://www.phrp.com.au/wp‐content/uploads/2021/03/PHRP3112101.pdf
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Readings for week 5
Framework for Community Engagement – NSW Police
Position descriptions
Community Engagement Coordinator‐ National Stroke Foundation
Engagement and Activation Officer – City of Melton
Consumer and Community Engagement Framework ‐ Health Consumers
Queensland
* We expect you to have read these prior to your seminar this week
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What is Community Engagement?
Stakeholder: Any individual or group of people with a
specific stake in the outcome of a decision.
‘’…providing a range of opportunities for a
Engagement can include…
two‐way exchange. Community engagement
• one‐way communication or information delivery
strengthens relationships, shapes decisions
and enables us to learn from each other.’
• consultation
‘…a long‐term process through which we try to involve people ‐
Hard‐to‐reach: Individuals and groups that are more
difficult to involve in community engagement and have
multiple barriers to engagement.
• involvement and collaboration in decision‐making
individuals or groups in identifying problems and shaping and
• empowered action in informal groups or formal
partnerships
implementing decisions and programs that affect them’.
Deliberation: An engagement process with a select
group of community members. The process focusses on
a defined issue, weighs up options and provides
Sustained Engagement is used to refer to the culmination of the process, implying that the process has come to
recommendations to decision‐makers.
fruition and that the intended shared outcomes are reached.
Source: Framework for Community Engagement ‐ NSW Police, Framework for Community Engagement – City of Ballarat
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Source: Framework for Community Engagement ‐ NSW Police, Framework for Community Engagement – City of Ballarat
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7/30/2022
Community and engagement
from successful engagement?
Government, councils or organisations…in the following ways:
• a planned process with the specific purpose of
working with identified groups of people to address
issues affecting their well‐being
• a broad term used to define groups of people
• there are different kinds of communities:
communities of place, interest, belief and
circumstance.
• Stronger policies
• Services are delivered more effectively
• Keeps in check with the relationship ‐ is the organisation meeting the needs of
the community?
• Linking the term ‘community’ to ‘engagement’ serves
to broaden the scope, shifting the focus from the
individual to the collective.
• communities are dynamic—they change over
time and interact in different ways.
• Highlights potential issues
Source: Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government
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What issues do we need to engage about?
from successful engagement?
• Is the organisation required by legislation to engage the community about the issue?
• Is it an issue where the quality of the outcome will depend on stakeholder input?
• Is it an issue where the quality of the outcome will depend on the motivation and commitment of the
community to comply with the organisations’s decision or direction?
For stakeholders and communities…in the following ways:
• Opportunities for voices to be heard
• Is it an issue where the quality of the outcome will depend on the cooperation and collaboration of individuals
or organisations in the community?
• Get regular feedback
• Opportunities to highlight priorities
• Is it an issue that the local government has any power or discretion over?
• Sense of belonging
• How complex is the issue?
• Can lead to proactive and empowered community members
• How significant will the impact of the decision be on the community?
• How politically sensitive is the issue in the community?
Source: Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government
Source: Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government
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City of Yarra community vision for 2036
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5Jg99J6tZI Community Engagement: City of Canning (WA)
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7/30/2022
Community Engagement at Deakin
https://www.yarracity.vic.gov.au/news/2021/07/21/yarras‐first‐ever‐community‐vision‐adopted‐by‐council
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https://www.deakin.edu.au/collaboration/community‐engagement
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Different ways of engaging
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In preparation for week 6
(after the intra‐trimester break)
No readings
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…..take a break from study (for this unit at least)
7/23/2022
Lecture 4 –
Partnerships
HSH212 Professional Practice
Week 4, T2
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Volunteer Mentor – Refugee Migrant Children Centre
(Sunshine/online)
Australian Volunteers – Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist
Organisation : Refugee Migrant Children Centre
Location : Melbourne, Online (Sunshine)
Time required : 2‐3 hours a week
Duration of project : A minimum period of 6 months
Skill area : Advocacy, Community Services, Digital
Volunteering, Education & Training, Mental / Health
Counseling, Other, Program Coordination &
Management, Social & Support Work
Sector : Children, Community Development, Community
Engagement, Community Support Services, Education &
Training, Families, Homelessness & Affordable
Housing, Humanitarian, Law, Justice & Human
Rights, Mental Health, Youth & Young People
Application closing date : 17 Aug, 2022
Organisation : Australian Volunteers/Australian Aid
Location : Timor‐Leste
Time required :Full‐time
Duration of project :12‐months
Skill area : Monitoring and Evaluation, Volunteering, Data
Collection, Data Analysis, Capacity Building
Sector : Children, Families, Health, Youth & Young People
Living allowance: $2813/month
Application closing date : 4 Aug, 2022
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7/23/2022
Partnerships
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So…what do we mean by partnerships?
Partnerships involve:
• shared vision
• ensuring effective communication and information sharing
• articulating measurable objectives and strategies agreed on by all partners
• investing time in developing trust among members of the partnership
• recognising common and overlapping health promotion goals of partner organisations
• supporting ways health promotion can be made relevant to different goals of partner organisations
• recognising the different experience and perspectives from partners
• ensuring effective communication and information sharing
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7/23/2022
9 Local Public Health Units (LPHUs) across Victoria
Geographic Boundaries of LPHU
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Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion
individuals, communities and governments working in partnership
• Mediate: the prerequisites and prospects for health cannot be
ensured by the health sector alone.
• Health promotion demands coordinated action by all concerned:
by governments, by health and other social and economic
sectors, by non governmental and voluntary organisations, by
local authorities, by industry and by the media.
• People in all walks of life are involved as individuals, families and
communities.
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7/23/2022
Activity 1: Partnerships Analysis Tool
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Activity 2: local government partnerships
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7/23/2022
Next week
These readings will help you to get a better handle on the concepts around community engagement
and will assist you with AT1 and AT2.
Framework for Community Engagement – NSW Police
Consumer and Community Engagement Framework ‐ Health Consumers Queensland
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5
16/07/2022
Overview
•Discuss this week’s Position Descriptions Briefly
•Define Capacity Building
•Examine Outcomes from Capacity Building
•Unpack a community‐based capacity building example
HSH212 Professional Practice
Lecture 3, T2
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Position descriptions
Capacity building is…
An approach to the development of sustainable skills, organisational structure, resources and commitment to
health improvement in health and other sectors, to prolong and multiply health gains many times over.
• An approach
• A collaborative process of shared power, resources, knowledge and experiences
• Reflects diversity of people and groups
• A negotiated engagement
Greater Shepparton City Council – Healthy Ageing Officer
Source: SA Health, Government of South Australia
Community capacity building is about promoting the ‘capacity’ of local communities to develop, implement and
Australian Heart Foundation– Heart Health Educator (Warrnambool)
sustain their own solutions to problems in a way that helps them shape and exercise control over their physical,
social, economic and cultural environments.
Source: Western Australian Department for Community Development
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CB is more than just training people
It includes the following:
A ‘means to an end’
Human resource development
And end in itself
A process
Organisational development
Institutional and legal framework development
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Outcomes of community
capacity building
Capacity Building
with a focus on…
Organisational Development
• Encourages inclusive community participation
• Strengthens individual skills
• Enhancing community decision making and
problem solving processes
• Encourages a shared understanding and vision
• Building the skills and confidence of individuals
and groups
• Facilitates consistent, tangible progress
toward goals
• Implementing practical strategies for creating
change
• Expands leadership base
• Promoting inclusion and social justice
Workforce Development
Build Capacity
Infrastructure
Resource Allocation
Program sustainability
Partnerships
Problem solving
Leadership
Context
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Organisational development
Workforce development
• Policies and strategic plans
• Organisational management structures
• On the job learning including incidental and informal learning opportunities
• Management support and commitment
• Course development
• Recognition and reward systems
• Professional Development (PD) opportunities
• Information systems – monitoring and evaluation
• Tertiary degrees
• Quality Improvement systems
• Professional support & supervision
• Informal organisational culture
• Performance management systems
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Resource allocation
Partnerships
• Financial Resources
• Shared goals
• Human Resources
• Relationships
• Access to information
• Planning
• Specialist advice
• Implementation
• Decision making tools and models
• Evaluation
• Physical resources
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16/07/2022
Leadership
How can you build capacity for HP now ?
• Interpersonal skills
As a teacher I am helping to build your capacity to promote health
‐ build knowledge, skills, values and increase the size of the sector
• Technical skills
• Personal qualities
• Strategic visioning
As a student, explain to friends/family why health promotion is important
‐ e.g. that prevention is better than a cure
• Systems thinking
• Visions for the future
• Organisational management
As a student joining a HP professional/student network
‐ e.g. build financial resources through subscription, volunteer skills and knowledge
• Communication skills
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Capacity building: for whom?
Rationale for Capacity Building
Multiply health gains
Three different actors in capacity building
Visibility
• Government or non‐government (NGO) – design the programs or offering funding
Accountability
• HP practitioners – implementing programs, usually employed by above
Responsive systems
• Community members, individuals/groups who are program targets or otherwise encouraged to
Address inequity
become participants
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Reorient health services
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Building community capacity in a remote Aboriginal
community in the Northern Territory
Resource mobilisation
Participation
Leadership
Links to others
Problem assessment
Outside agents
example:
Building and measuring community capacity
Asking why
Program management
Organisational structures
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