+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

Hello, thanks for helping me! this assignment is to write a grant proposal. I already did a part of the paper, I included the appendices and reference list; you don’t have to worry about those. I only need from bullet point ” purpose of the project” to bullet point “Dissemination plan”. The research topic is Chronic Disease manangement in Patients with Diabetes in adults (25-64 years). Your part should only be about 3-4 pages. Please type in the document I already started titled “EBP Grant proposal” attached below. I will attach other helpful resources as well.

Regis College
Informed Consent to be in
Researcher: LB
Introduction
Please read this form carefully. You are being asked to be in a research study of Self-management interventions of chronic disease for patients
with Diabetes. You were selected to be in this study because you have been diagnosed with a chronic disease that requires self-management.
You are not eligible to participate if you are not diagnosed with a chronic disease that requires long term self-management. Please ask any
questions you may have before you agree to be in the study. You will receive copy of this consent form.
Purpose of the Study
The purpose of this study is [Explain the research question and purpose in lay language.].
What Will Happen in the Study
If you agree to be in this study, we will interview you about your knowledge of your disease and how you currently manage it. Over a span of
four months, we will monitor how you manage your disease based on the education we will provide to you by interviewing you once a week and
monitoring your lab results. Interview will only be 30 minutes long every week over virtually. It will be scheduled ay a convenient time for you.
Benefits of Being in this Study
The benefits of being in this study is that you will learn how to self-manage your chronic disease.
Risks and Discomforts of Being in this Study
There are no foreseeable risks participating in this study.
Payments
There is no payment for being in this study.
Cost
There is no cost to you for being in this research study.
Choosing to Be in the Study and Choosing to Quit the Study
It is your choice to be in this study. If you choose not to be in this study, it will not affect your current or future relations with Regis.
You are free to decline to answer questions or quit at any time, for any reason. There is no penalty for not taking part or for quitting.
If you are an employee, participating in the study will have no impact on their employment status as interviews will be held virtually
based on your availability.
Getting Dismissed from the Study
The researcher may dismiss you from the study at any time for the following reasons: If you have not followed the study rules; if you
miss more than two interview meetings in a month; or if study sponsor decided to end the study.
Privacy
The records of this study will be kept private. All electronic information will be coded and secured using a password-protected file.
Only clinicians involved in the study will have access to records. Responses will be anonymous to protect the identity of the
participants. No published reports will include any information that will make it possible to identify you.
Contacts and Questions
The researcher conducting this study is: Lamlat Badaru. The researcher will be available to answer any questions about the study at:
[401-499-5639]. If you have questions or concerns about your rights, you may contact the Regis Institutional Review Board Chair:
Dr. Margaret Oot-Hayes, PhD, RN
781-768-7163
margaret.oot-hayes@regiscollege.edu
Statement of Consent
I have read this form (or have had it read to me). I have been encouraged to ask questions. I have received answers to my questions.
I give my consent to be in this study. I have received (or will receive) a copy of this form. I understand the risks and discomforts
associated with the above study and understand that I may quit the study at any time without penalty.
Signature(s)/Date
[Adult Participant Informed Consent]
Participant Printed Name: ___________________________________
Participant Signature: ___________________________________ Date: __________
[Participant’s Legal Representative]
Participant Printed Name: ___________________________________
Legal Representative Printed Name: ___________________________________
Legal Representative Signature: ________________________________
Witness Printed Name: ___________________________________
Date: __________
Witness Signature: ___________________________________
Date: __________
APA
Reference
Ahmad, A.
A.N.,
Sallehuddin,
A. A. M., Teo,
C. Y. &
Research
Question
What is
nurses’
experience in
providing
education on
Type of Study
The researchers
used qualitative
phenomenologic
al study, semistructured
Research
Design
Ahmad and
colleagues
used a
qualitative
research
Sample,
Sample Size
and How
Selected
The sample
was all
certified
diabetic nurse
educators
Instruments
Used, Reliability
and Validity,
Data Collection
Methods
Results
(including
statistical
analysis
Ahmad et al.
used semistructured
focused group
interviews
Data analysis
revealed that
nurses can use
various
teaching
Limitations
Consistent
with other
Literature)
Ahmad and
colleagues used
a qualitative
approach to the
study, leading to
Rahman, A.
H. (2020).
Self-care
management
of patients
with diabetes:
Nurses’
perspectives.
Journal of
Diabetes &
Metabolic
Disorders,
19(2): 15371542.
self-care
management
to patients
with
diabetes?
interviews, and
thematic analysis
of the data.
design
through semistructured
focus group
interviews
with nurses
from two
referral
hospitals
(2020). The
researchers
conducted
two focus
group
interviews,
recorded the
audio, and
later returned
to the
responders to
affirm their
responses.
(NDEs) from
referral
hospitals in
two health
centers in the
Brunei-Muara
district. A
sample of
eleven (n=11)
DNEs was
selected and
recruited for
the study.
The
participants
were selected
using based
on various
inclusion
criteria. The
first is that
certified
DNEs are
working with
Brunei’s
nursing
board. The
second
criterion is
experience
working and
(2020). They
used pre-testing
participants’
protocol and
questionnaires
before the study
to ensure the
collected data’s
comprehensibilit
y, reliability, and
validity.
methods,
techniques and
strategies to
help diabetic
patients in
self-care to
improve
outcome
(Ahmad et al.,
2020).
Education
session based
on patients’
preferences
and
individualized
teaching plans
were found to
be effective
especially
while
maintaining
standard
content.
Combining
patient
education with
supplementary
material like
leaflets,
drawing,
nongeneralizabl
e results in other
contexts (2020).
Most of the
participants
were young
nurses who may
be considered
partly
inexperienced in
the study area.
educating
diabetic
patients.
pictures and
practical
demonstration
s also
improved
education
outcomes and
the quality of
selfmanagement
for this
population.
However,
nurses
expressed a
lack of
psychological
readiness,
financial
barriers, and
denial from
the patient as
significant
obstacles to
the selfmanagement
plans. The
findings by
Ahmad et al.
(2017) were
consistent with
Reyes et al.
(2017) on
factors that
affect
psychological
preparedness
for self-care in
diabetic
patients.
Reyes, J.,
Tripp-Reimer,
T., Parker, E.,
Muller, B. &
Laroche, H.
(2017).
Factors
influencing
diabetes selfmanagement
among
medically
underserved
patients with
type II
diabetes.
Global
Qualitative
Nursing
Research,
4(2017).
How do
Descriptive
issues related qualitative study
to diabetes
selfmanagement
compare in
people it
good versus
glycemic
control?
Reyes and
colleagues
used a
qualitative
research
design and
focus group
format to
collect data
from the
responders
(2017). They
opted for this
design since it
would help
identify,
examine and
understand
the
underserved
population’s
The
researchers
used a sample
size of 120
participants
recruited, but
44 completed
the study.
They were
distributed in
fifteen
groups, each
with eight
participants.
The
respondents
were from
rural and
urban
underserved
areas.
Apart from the
focus groups,
Reyes and
colleagues used
Single Item
Literacy Screener
(SILS) to assess
the participants’
health literacy.
They recorded
and transcribed
the responses for
further analysis.
Reyes et al.
observed that
self-care
management
was effective
in in glycemic
control and
improved life
quality in
underserved
population
(2017).
However,
patient faced
significant
obstacles like
emotional
distress (fear,
sadness,
anxiety,
depression and
The study is
limited to
focusing only on
participants who
accessed or
were skilled in
accessing public
transportation.
The limitation
explains why
transportation
issues were not
highlighted as
significant
themes in the
focus groups.
The study also
captured the
responses of
English and
Spanish-
beliefs,
motivations,
skills, and
practices in
self-care
plans for
diabetes.
However,
most were
from urban
centers by the
Iowa Primary
Care
Association
(IAPCA),
which
partners with
the
University of
Iowa Institute
for Clinical
and
Translational
Studies.
distress),
which
compared with
the findings by
Ahmed and
colleagues.
Due to the
uniqueness of
this population
(underserved),
they face other
obstacles like
limited access
to healthcare,
medication,
and healthy
diets. Reyes
recommended
open
discussion
between
providers and
patients on
emotional
distress to
improve selfcare
management
plans.
speaking
respondents
from rural sites.
The majority,
comprising 68%
of the
participants,
were women,
implying the
findings mostly
apply to women.
Sayeed, A. K.,
Qayyum, A.,
Jamshed, F.,
Gill, U.,
Usama, M. S.,
Asghar, K. &
Tahir, A.
(2020).
Impact of
diabetesrelated selfmanagement
of glycemic
control in
Type II
diabetes
mellitus.
Cureus
Journal of
Medical
Science,
12(4): e7845
What are the
impacts
related to
selfmanagement
for diabetes
on glycemic
control in
Type II
Diabetes
mellitus?
Sayeed et al.
assessed the
research question
using qualitative
research (2020).
The
researchers’
qualitative
design
involved an
observational
crosssectional
study.
The sample
population
was diabetic
outpatients in
the
department of
a secondary
care hospital
in Karachi,
Pakistan. The
sample size
was n=326,
54.9% males
and 47.9%
females.
Sayeed and
colleagues also
used Diabetes
SelfManagement
Questionnaire
(DSMQ) to
evaluate the
correlation
between patients’
activities of selfcare and their
glycemic control
(2020). DSMQ
has established
validity and
reliability.
Sayeed et al.
found out that
people with
disabilities had
poor glycemic
control, and
patients older
than sixty
years were
likely to have
poor glycemic
controls
compared to
younger
generations
(2020). Many
of the patients
with optimal
glycemic
control had
higher
education
outcomes,
suggesting an
indirect link
between
education and
selfmanagement
outcomes. A
quarter of the
The language
barrier was a
significant
limitation of the
study. The
primary
instrument of
measure,
DSMQ, was
customized to
the Urdu version
(Sayeed et al.,
2018). This
means that all
respondents that
were not
conversant with
the Urdu
language were
automatically
disqualified
from the study.
Since selfmanagement
plans differ with
ethnicity,
Sayeed et al.’s
results are not
generalizable to
other ethnicities.
population
with poor
glycemic
control was
unemployed.
The
relationship
between
unemployment
and poor
glycemic
control can be
linked to cost
obstacles that
Raye et al.
identified and
which limit
individuals’
access to
healthcare
(2017). The
factors include
poor access or
unaffordability
of quality care,
lack of proper
medication,
and healthy
dietary plans
leading to poor
glycemic
control.
Lambrinou, E.
Hansen, B. T.
& Beulens,
W.J. J. (2019).
Lifestyle
factors, selfmanagement
and patient
empowerment
in diabetes
care.
European
Journal of
Preventive
Cardiology,
26(2).
What are the
lifestyle
factors that
affect selfmanagement
and
empowerme
nt in selfmanagement
care in
diabetes
patients?
Lambrinou and
colleagues
conducted a
literature review
to answer the
research
question.
The
researchers
used a
qualitative
research
design using
keywords like
diabetes
mellitus,
cardiovascula
r, lifestyle
factors, and
selfmanagement
education.
Lambrinou et
al. reviewed
eighty-six
articles and
summarized
their
discussion on
the role and
effect of
patient
empowermen
t, lifestyle
modification,
and education
in diabetes
management
(2019). The
inclusion
criteria were
published
between 2010
and 2019.
The other
criterion is
articles
published on
PubMed,
Google
The researchers
had the authority
and scope to
complete the
review since all
are affiliated
with educational
and research
institutions.
The reviewed
study depicted
a positive
correlation
between selfcare plans and
improvement
in diabetes
outcomes.
However,
Lambrinou et
al. found that
providers can
empower
patients
through
supplementary
education,
including
posters and
videos,
especially in
waiting rooms.
The findings
are consistent
with those of
Ahmad et al.
(2020), who
The approach by
Lambrinou et al.
to the study
question has
limitations of
bias that can
cause
misinterpretatio
n of the study
outcomes. A
bias is common
at any stage of
the research. For
example, the
study’s selection
of articles for
review is based
on a few
criteria, each
with the
potential for
many articles. It
is unclear why
the researchers
settled on one
article over
another for
review.
Scholar, and
Cochrane.
Smoorenburg,
N.A.,
Hertroijis, L.
F.D., Dekkers,
T., Elissen,
J.M.A. &
Melles, M.
(2019).
Patients’
perspective on
selfmanagement:
Type 2
diabetes in
daily life.
BMC Health
Service
Research,
19(605).
What are
patients’
perspectives
on selfmanagement
in type 2
diabetes in
their daily
lives?
Qualitative
research design
using semistructured
interviews.
Smoorenburg
et al. used
sensitizing
booklets to
structure
participants’
responders to
trigger their
reflections on
their
experiences
with selfmanagement
of diabetes
(2019). They
also used the
centered
design to
engage with
Smoorenburg
reached out to
sixty people
for the
research, but
only 10
(n=10)
completed the
study (2019).
The
responders
were selected
if they were
diagnosed
with T2DM
in less than
five years,
used
diabetes-
found
individualized
patient
education to
be effective in
improving
patients’
outcomes in
selfmanagement
of diabetes.
Semi-structured
face-to-face
interviews were
conducted, and
listened back
while taking
notes to ensure
the validity of the
responses. The
results were then
condensed to
create statements
within each topic
based on a
general inductive
approach.
Patients with
T2DM had to
decide and
satisfy
complex care
activities daily
to maintain
adequate
glycemic
control.
Patients were
found to
experience
selfmanagement
when recently
diagnosed and
fades away
with time they
The responses in
this study were
from the
patients rather
than health
professionals.
Since the
researchers
focused on
patients’
subgroups with
recent
diagnoses,
adequate
glycaemic
control and selfmanagement
support may be
a more efficient
participants in related care
the interview offered by
quickly.
Dutch
primary care,
and had
stable
glycemic
control
(equals or
below
60mmol/mol)
.
consider
diabetes to be
part of their
daily lives
including
routine
medication.
Smoorenburg
et al. also
found out pain
and fatigue
related to
diabetes also
stirred
psychological
issues like
anxiety,
feelings of loss
of control, and
disappointmen
t. The findings
are consistent
with those of
Rayes et al.
(2017) and
Ahmad et al.
(2020) that
mental health
issues are
significant
obstacles to
and costeffective
treatment
approach than
care led by
providers. The
general
inductive
approach that
the researchers
relied on only
offers the first
description of
important topics
related to selfmanagement
and support.
effective
diabetes selfcare plans.
Eva, J.,
Kassab, W.
Y., Neoh, F.
C., Ming, C.
L., Wong, Y.
Y., Hameed,
A. M. & Hoi,
Y. (2018).
Self-care and
selfmanagement
among
adolescent
T2DM
patients: A
review.
Frontier in
Endocrinolog
y, 18(2018).
Are self-care
and selfmanagement
effective
among
adolescent
patients with
T2DM?
Eva et al. used a
systematic
review approach
to answer the
research question
(2018).
The
researchers
used a
qualitative
research
design to
review and
analyze selfcare and selfmanagement
in the target
population.
The sample
population
for the study
was n=12.
The selection
criteria for
the research
articles
included all
articles
between12 19
years and
derived from
Google
Scholar,
Scopus, or
Medline
alone. The
search terms
were T2DM,
adolescent
diabetes, selfmanagement,
and self-care.
Eva et al.
guaranteed the
reliability of the
study by
identifying
research articles
with relatively
large sample
sizes. However,
using a small
sample size of
twelve articles
dilutes their
study’s validity.
Results
analysis by
Eva et al.
established
that effective
self-care plans
that include
adaptation to
healthy foods,
physical
activities,
glucose
monitoring,
and proper
medication are
necessary for
diabetes
management
in adolescents.
Their
observation
that parental
involvement
and clinicians’
intervention
through patient
education
Most of the
articles the
researchers
reviewed lacked
experimental
trials, and the
available
treatment and
management
recommendation
s were based on
adults’ contexts.
This limitation
makes the
results of their
study
ungeneralizable.
aligns with
those of
Ahmad et al.
(2020),
Lambrinou et
al. (2019),
Sayeed et al.
(2019), and
Rayee et al.
(2017).
Moulaei, K.,
Dinari, Z.,
Dinari, F.,
Jahani, Y. &
Bahaadinbeig
y, K. (2022).
The role of
social network
in diabetes
self-care: A
crosssectional
study. Wiley
Health
Science
Report,
5(e601): 1-13.
What role do
social
networks
play in
diabetic selfcare?
The researchers
used a crosssectional
approach to
answer the study
question.
A qualitative
research
design was
used in this
study. It
involved an
electronic
researchermade
questionnaire.
Moulaei et al.
used a sample
size were
n=218. The
responders
were selected
through
convenience
sampling
based on
inclusion and
exclusion
criteria.
Moulaei et al.
used KuderRichardson and
Cronbach tests to
measure the
reliability of the
test since it had
binary variables,
social networks,
and diabetes selfcare.
Data analysis
revealed that
social media
can improve
clinical
outcomes, life
quality,
behavioral
outcomes, and
self-efficacy
factors. The
results were
consistent with
those of
Rasoul et al.
(2019), who
observed that
weblog
education
improves self-
A limitation of
this study is the
use of a small
sample size,
which reduces
the results’
generalizability.
care outcomes
and patients’
overall life
quality. The
networks offer
fast and
efficient
communicatio
n between
users leading
to cost
reduction and
affordability of
diabetes selfcare.
Rasoul, M. A.,
Jalali, R.,
Abdi, A.,
Salari, N.,
Rahimi, M. &
Mohammadi,
M. (2019).
The effect of
selfmanagement
education
through
weblogs on
the quality of
life of diabetic
Is selfmanagement
education
through
weblogs
effective in
improving
life quality
for diabetic
patients?
Rasoul et al.
used a qualitative
approach in data
collection and
analyzed data
quantitatively.
Mixed
method
design that
involved
diabetes
quality of life
(DQOL), a
short form
clinical
questionnaire.
The
interventions
were
conducted
through a
The sample
size for the
study was
n=98. The
study
population
was selected
through
random
sampling.
The instrument
used, the MannWhitney U test,
is validated and
reliable to enable
researchers to
make different
conclusions on
data based on a
set of
assumptions and
data distribution.
Data analysis
by Rasoul et
al., revealed
that weblog
was effective
in selfmanagement
education
since it
improved
anthropometri
c indicators
like waist
circumference
and BMI in the
The study had a
limitation of
using electronic
education
(weblog) that
was not
available or
common to
many
participants.
Only 20 of the
participants
aged above 47
years could use
the internet or
patients. BMC
Medical
Information
and Decision
Making,
19(205).
weblog, and
the collected
data were
analyzed
using MannWhitney and
SPSS
methods.
participant.
The
intervention
also improved
diabetes life
quality for the
patients. These
results align
with Moulaei
et al. (2022)
that social
networks can
improve life
quality
through selfcare in
diabetic
patients.
had access to the
service. This
resulted in the
partial
implementation
of selfmanagement
education.
Besides, it
targeted only
those patients
who visited
Teleghani
diabetic clinics,
suggesting a
lack of
generalizability
in the study.
Measurement Tool
Multiple tools can be used to measure the change in self-management abilities among patients with diabetes. Some of these notable
EBP tools include:
Adherence and Self-management Monitoring Tool (ASMMT)
This tool primarily focuses on measuring the patient’s Self-management changes in medication and Self-Monitoring of blood glucose
(SMBG). The instrument comprises 16 items (questions) focused on finding out how the patient is undertaking self-medication and
what the patient is doing to self-monitor blood sugar levels over a specific period. This tool will be vital in my research as it will help
me understand how self-management among diabetic patients correlates with their ability to take medication and engage in healthy
habits geared at self-monitoring blood sugar levels. This tool’s face and content validity is backed by a study by Yusuff and Joseph
(2008) on medication adherence among type-2 diabetic patients. They showed that the tool had test-retest reliability of .90.
Diabetes Care Profile (DCP)
This tool measures self-care and diet adherence changes among self-managing diabetic patients. It comprises 8 items using the format
of a 5-point Likert scale. Participants rate their diet and self-care adherence during self-management based on the predefined
measurement scale. This tool will be vital for my research in understanding self-managing diabetic patients’ ratings regarding their diet
adherence and self-care efforts. I have selected this tool due to its vast validity and reliability in measuring the change in perception
about life aspects such as happiness and satisfaction among diabetic patients under self-management. It will be used to monitor the
change in patient ratings about their quality of life as a result of their diet and self-care adherence during their diabetic selfmanagement for improvement of quality of life. According to a study by Fitzgerald et al. (1996), this tool showed a criterion validity
of r=.28/0.15 (GHB), with a concurrent validity of r=-35 and r=.23 for satisfaction and happiness measurement scales. They also
found an internal consistency (reliability) of Cronbach’s α =.70 -.87.
Diabetes Self-care Ability Questionnaire (DSCAQ)
This tool will measure self-management areas such as diet, SMBG, exercise, hygiene, information, medication routine, and following.
It has been chosen due to the depth of content areas that can measure changes in the quality of health among diabetic patients during
self-care. It contains 36 items formatted like a 4-point Likert scale. Its high validity makes it ideal for measuring changes in the quality
of life during diabetic self-management. Partiprajak et al. (2011) found it to have an internal consistency of Cronbach’s = .83, making
it a highly reliable tool for measuring change among diabetic patients under self-management.
References
Ahmad, A. A.N., Sallehuddin, A. A. M., Teo, C. Y. & Rahman, A. H. (2020). Self-care magement of patients with diabetes: Nurses’
perspectives. Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, 19(2): 1537-1542. Retrieved from
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7843803/
Eva, J., Kassab, W. Y., Neoh, F. C., Ming, C. L., Wong, Y. Y., Hameed, A. M. & Hoi, Y. H., Saeker., R. M. (2018). Self-care and
self-management among adolescent T2DM patients: A review. Frontier in Endocrinology, 9(489): 1-7. Retrieved from
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2018.00489/full
Fitzgerald, J. T., Davis, W. K., Connell, C. M., Hess, G. E., Funnell, M. M., & Hiss, R. G. (1996). Development and validation of the
Diabetes Care Profile. Evaluation & the health professions, 19(2), 208–230. https://doi.org/10.1177/016327879601900205
Lambrinou, E. Hansen, B. T. & Beulens, W.J. J. (2019). Lifestyle factors, self-management and patient empowerment in diabetes care.
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 26(2). Retrieved from
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2047487319885455
Moulaei, K., Dinari, Z., Dinari, F., Jahani, Y. & Bahaadinbeigy, K. (2022). The role social network in diabetes self-care: A crosssectional study. Wiley Health Science Report, 5(e601): 1-13. Retrieved from
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/hsr2.601
Partiprajak, S., Hanucharurnkul, S., Piaseu, N., Brooten, D., & Nityasuddhi, D. (2011). Outcomes of an advanced practice nurse-led
type-2 diabetes support group. Pacific Rim International Journal of Nursing Research, 15(4), 288-304. https://he02.tcithaijo.org/index.php/PRIJNR/article/view/6440
Rasoul, M. A., Jalali, R., Abdi, A., Salari, N., Rahimi, M. & Mohammadi, M. (2019). The effect of self-management education
through weblogs on the quality of life of diabetic patients. BMC Medical Information and Decision Making, 19(205).
Retrieved from https://bmcmedinformdecismak.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12911-019-0941-6
Reyes, J., Tripp-Reimer, T., Parker, E., Muller, B. & Laroche, H. (2017). Factors influencing diabetes self-management among
medically underserved patients with type II diabetes. Global Qualitative Nursing Research, 4(2017). Retrieved from
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5476324/
Sayeed, A. K., Qayyum, A., Jamshed, F., Gill, U., Usama, M. S., Asghar, K. & Tahir, A. (2020). Impact of diabetes-related selfmanagement of glycemic control in Type II diabetes mellitus. Cureus Journal of Medical Science, 12(4): e7845. Retrieved
from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7253072/
Smoorenburg, N.A., Hertroijis, L..F.D., Dekkers, T., Elissen, J.M.A. & Melles, M. (2019). Patients’ perspective on self-management:
Type 2 diabetes in daily life. BMC Health Service Research, 19(605). Retrieved from
https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12913-019-4384-7
Yusuff, K. B., Obe, O., & Joseph, B. Y. (2008). Adherence to anti-diabetic drug therapy and self-management practices among type-2
diabetics in Nigeria. Pharmacy world & science: PWS, 30(6), 876–883. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11096-008-9243-2
Hi Lamlat,
Good start. Do you have other references that you have used to underpin your EBP
Project proposal? See comments in the margin. What theoretical Framework on
Self-Management did you choose? Who is the author? Be sure to reference.
(Remember that you will be using the IOWA Evidence-based Practice Model to
guide the project) See your text. All EBP projects must utilize an EBP Practice
model).
Keep up the good work.
Evidence Based Research Topic
Lamlat Badaru
Nur 610
6/12/22
Chronic Disease Self-Management in Patients with Diabetes. See attached for topic
summary.
1. Research Topic
Self-management interventions of chronic disease for patients with Diabetes
2. Research Problem
The effective self-management interventions of chronic disease for treating or managing diabetes
are not well understood.
3. Research Purpose
The purpose of the study is to identify effective self-management interventions of chronic
disease for managing diabetes.
4. Research Objectives/Aims
To investigate the self-management interventions that can be used to manage diabetes.
To evaluate the most effective self-management interventions that can manage diabetes.
To analyze life threatening behaviors for diabetes patients engaging in self-management
interventions.
5. Research Question(s)
What are the available self-management interventions for chronic diseases that can be used
by patients with diabetes?
What are the most effective self-management interventions for patients with diabetes?
What are the best or worst behaviors for diabetic patients engaging in a self-management
approach?
Commented [AF1]: Stay focused on the first 2 questions.
DELETE the 3rd highlighted in yellow
6. Research Hypothesis*
Diabetic patients engaging in self-management behaviors involving physical activity and
healthy eating experience fewer acute or chronic complications.
Diabetic patients that are compliant with medication experience better care outcomes
than incompliant patients.
Patients monitoring blood sugar have better outcomes than those that do not monitor their
blood sugar.
Commented [AF2]: Change to adherent.
Suggest you collapse these r/t statements to one or two
statements.
Cite reference
Diabetic patients who have healthy coping skills and risk-reduction behaviors have fewer
chronic outcomes than those with less coping skills.
7. Select Theoretical Framework: write a brief summary about the theoretical framework
and why it is relevant to your research topic. (We will return to writing about this in more
Commented [AF3]: Look at Ryan & Sawin (2009) for a
Theoretical Framework -Indiv & Fam Self- Management
detail in upcoming weeks
Coping skills
Behaviours
Risk Reduction
behaviour
SelfManagement
Blood Sugar
monitoring
Techniques
Medication
Compliance
Commented [AF4]: Cite the reference immediately under
the schematic.
According to Zeng et al. (2014), self-management involves a set of daily behaviors performed by
a patient to manage their diabetes. Effective self-management has also been linked with better
diabetes-related health outcomes. Studies show that both behaviors and techniques have an
influence on self-management of chronic diseases. Therefore, certain behaviors and techniques
for self-management can be used by patients with diabetes (Zeng et al., 2014). In this case,
behaviors such as coping skills and risk reduction behaviors comprise behaviors that can be used
to self-manage diabetes patients. Similarly, techniques such as blood sugar monitoring and
medical compliance can also be employed to self-manage diabetes.
Reference
Zeng, B., Sun, W., Gary, R. A., Li, C., & Liu, T. (2014). Towards a conceptual model of diabetes
self-management among Chinese immigrants in the United States. International journal of
environmental research and public health, 11(7), 6727–6742.
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph110706727
Commented [AF5]: Center Space References
Format in APA
See APA (2020) 7th ed. Chapter 2 -Student Paper
example.

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

  
error: Content is protected !!