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I have to do an outline on my persuasive speech topic which is due in a few hours. I will attach the rubric that we are supposed to follow as well as a “sample persuasive outline that meets all requirements.”

Sample Persuasive Speech Outline
COM380 Public Speaking
Student’s Name: Erin Solomon (fictitious student)
Course #/Section: 04:192:380:07
Note: Complete all parts of the Persuasive Speech Outline. Review relevant readings and lectures on:
Audience Analysis, Researching Your Speech, Supporting Materials for Your Speech, Organizing Your
Speech, Outlining Your Speech, Persuasive Speaking, & Methods of Persuasion. Also, refer to the
“Sample Persuasive Speech Outline” as an example of an outline that meets the requirements, as well as the
“Persuasive Speech Outline Rubric” to understand the instructor’s expectations and grading criteria.
Planning for the Persuasive Speech with Analysis
Speech Topic:
Organ Donation
Rhetorical Purpose:
To persuade my audience to donate their organs and tissues when they
die and to act upon their decision to donate.
Audience Analysis:
(Refer to chapters on
Audience Analysis &
Persuasive Speaking)
Summarize Audience demographics, prior exposure/knowledge,
common ground/interest, disposition/attitude, and situational
characteristics. Incorporate results of Audience Analysis Survey about
classmates from the Audience Analysis Activity/Discussion in Unit 3.
Also, incorporate techniques on “Tailoring your Persuasive Message to
Your Audience” from the readings on Persuasive Speaking.
Persuasive claims:
(refer to chapter on
Persuasive Speaking)
Organizational
Pattern:
(refer to chapters on
Organizing Your Speech
& Persuasive Speaking)
Recognizing that majority of my audience members are traditional
college students in the 18-24 age group (as noted in the Audience
Analysis survey and in classroom observations), I believe that I can
make this speech relevant and interesting for my audience by reflecting
on my personal experiences as a college student with the topic of organ
donation. This topic does not receive enough attention on the college
campus and I hope to make the speech relevant to my audience of
college students. Also, since majority of the class noted that they value
“family” (as noted in the Audience Analysis survey), I plan to focus on
the importance of the family in making decisions regarding organ
donations. This technique will also appeal to those students who may be
resistant to or unaware of this topic. Once again, it will be important for
me to keep the speech interesting for all of my classmates by
incorporating numerous types of speech support.
Organizing fact claims, value claims, or policy claims? Please explain.
In addition to advancing fact and value claims in this speech, I am
primarily organizing policy claims as they relate to organ donation.
Causal, comparison, categorical, criteria-application, motivated
sequence, problem-cause-solution pattern, or comparative advantage?
Please explain.
Because I am organizing policy claims in this speech, I chose the
problem-cause-solution organizational pattern. To properly advocate
on behalf of particular policy in this speech, the problem-cause solution
pattern allows me to introduce the problem of why there are few organ
donors, articulate some of the causes, and identify audience-centered
solutions to address this problem.
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
1
Message/
Methods of Persuasion
(refer to chapter on
Methods of Persuasion)
How do you plan to use evidence and reasoning (logos), and avoid
logical fallacies? Do you plan to use emotional appeals? (pathos) or
credibility (ethos)? (Note: be aware that presentation aids – e.g.,
PowerPoint – are required for this speech.)
I incorporate a number of credible references in order to build
integrity as a speaker and to persuade my audience members who are
resistant to or unfamiliar of the topic. This speech includes specific and
gripping examples and many of my persuasive appeals rely on
example reasoning. Finally, the use of credible statistics from reliable
sources allows me to avoid logical fallacies.
Types of Supporting
Materials:
(refer to chapter on
Supporting Materials)
What types of supporting materials do you plan to include? (e.g.,
examples, definitions, testimony, statistics, narratives, analogies)
Types of Research
Sources:
(review “Background
Information” for the
Speech Research
Activity)
What types of research sources (e.g., primary, secondary, and/or
tertiary) do you plan to use to support the thesis statement and main
points? Please explain. Note: 5 credible and relevant sources are
required including at least 1 source from a Rutgers University Libraries
periodical database.
This speech includes narrative, statistics, testimony, and various
examples of organ donors to persuade the audience to consider
volunteering to donate their organs when they die.
I use primary sources from journal articles from JSTOR and Academic
Search Premier periodical databases and a reputable website, and
secondary sources from credible hospital brochures to support my
thesis statement and main points.
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
2
Persuasive Speech “Working Outline”
Introduction
I.
II.
Write in complete sentences. Refer to chapter on Outlining Your Speech.
Attention Getter:
How do you feel when you have to wait for something you really,
really want? What if it was something you couldn’t live without?
Well, my cousin was five years old when he found out he needed a
new kidney. He went on the organ waiting list right away. He was
called twice during a six month span that they had a kidney available
only to find out that the kidney wasn’t a good match. He had to wait
again. The third time was a charm. A small adult was in an accident
and his kidney was a good match. This story had a happy ending, but
so many do not.
Thesis Statement:
There is a significant shortage of organ donors both in our nation
and our community and you can play an important role in
addressing this shortage.
III. Connection with
Audience:
One of the people on the waiting list for an organ transplant might
be someone you know.
IV.
Speaker’s Credibility:
This topic is very important to me and my family. As soon as my
cousin needed a new kidney, I started to do more research on this
topic.
V.
Preview of Main
Points:
Today I’d like to talk to you about the problem facing our nation and
our community, three causes contributing to this unfortunate
situation, and three solutions that you can contribute to best address
this increasingly important topic.
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
3
Persuasive Speech “Working Outline” (contd.)
Body
Write in complete sentences. Important: Include evidence and reasoning and other persuasive appeals in sub-points
(refer to source in each sub-point by paraphrasing, quoting, or summarizing with a citation following APA format – 6th
edition), and insert transitions between main points. Refer to chapters on Researching Your Speech, Outlining Your
Speech, and Persuasive Speaking, & Methods of Persuasion.
I.
Main Point One:
Sub-point A:
People around the world are in desperate need of organ transplants and
this shortage is causing many unnecessary deaths each year. According
to LifeSource, 10 people will die each day waiting for an organ
transplant.
Sub-point B:
There is a major shortage of potential donors both in our country. There
are only on the average 5,000 donors nationally per year. As of October
7, 1998, there are over 62,000 people waiting for an organ donation
(LifeSource: Statistics).
Sub-point C:
This problem is not only a national issue, but it is of great concern to our
own community. For example, as of October 7, 1998, 1,422 people from
Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and part of Wisconsin are
included in the organ waiting list (LifeSource: Statistics).
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
II.
(Problem) There’s a severe shortage of organ donations in our country,
which is contributing to many unnecessary deaths both nationally and
locally.
Transition:
Recognizing that this is an increasingly important problem for our
society, let’s explore three causes that are contributing to this situation.
Main Point Two:
(Cause) The cause of this nation-wide organ donation shortage is threefold.
Sub-point A:
First, potential donors have a fear of organ donation. These fears may
include the fear of end-of-life treatment, the fear of surgical incisions,
the fear of reflecting about death, and even the fear caused by religious
or cultural concerns. According to Medcure.org, however, “Most
religions support whole body donation and organ transplantation” and a
number of resources address the aforementioned fears in great depth.
Sub-point B:
Second, there is a general lack of knowledge regarding the steps needed
to volunteer to become an organ donor. As the next section shall
address, the process is quite simple and only takes a few minutes.
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point C:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Finally, families ironically contribute to the ongoing shortage problem
both in our nation and in our community. Families are involved in the
donation arrangements of deceased loved ones. According to Siminoff, et
al. (2001), “The major factor limiting the number of organ donors is the
low percentage of families who consent to donation” (p. 71).
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
4
Transition:
III. Main Point Three:
Now that we have an understanding of the three dominant causes
contributing to this problem, let’s explore three strategies you can take
to best address this problem.
(Solution) There are three ways you can play an important role in
addressing this nation-wide and community-wide problem.
Sub-point A:
Consider signing up to be a donor. Mark your driver’s license so that
your license indicates your intent to donate. Each state varies in their
requirements. Fill out, sign and carry a uniform donor card with you.
This donor card says what organs you wish to have donated and also
has places for your family members to sign as witnesses after you have
discussed your decision with them (Gundersen Lutheran Hospital,
undated brochure). If you do donate your organs, your family and the
people who receive your organs might benefit in a similar way like this
family. A seventeen year old died of head injuries in a car accident. His
mom decided to donate his organs. His heart went to a prison chaplain,
his kidneys went to a mother of 5 children and a Vietnam vet. The
Vietnam vet is “energetic” and finally is getting his college degree. The
teenager gave life to others and his family feels a sense of satisfaction
and comfort that other lives have been touched by his (University of
Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, 1991 brochure).
Sub-point B:
Consider volunteering in your local hospital to assist with their specific
organ donation needs. Whether it is assisting doctors with their unique
needs or volunteering to promote the importance of organ donation, you
can play an important role in addressing this problem. As more
individuals continue to donate their organs, doctors must also adapt to
best serve their patients and their families during this time of crisis
(Klein, et al., 2010).
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point C:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Transition:
Finally, be sure to share the importance of organ donation with your
friends and family. The following poem by Robert Test entitled, “To
Remember Me,” shows the importance of organ donation. “Give my sight
to the man who has never seen a sunrise, a baby’s face or love in the
eyes of a woman. Give my heart to a person whose heart has caused
nothing but endless days of pain… Take my bones, every muscle, every
fiber and nerve in my body and find a way to make a crippled child
walk…Take my cells, if necessary, and let them grow so that, someday, a
speechless boy will shout at the crack of a bat and a deaf girl will hear
the sound of rain against her window” (South Dakota Lions Eye Bank,
undated brochure).
As you can easily see, donating your organs can be one of the most
important decisions you ever make and also the greatest gift you could
ever give.
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
5
Persuasive Speech “Working Outline”
Conclusion
I.
II.
Write in complete sentences. Refer to chapter on Outlining Your Speech.
Summary of Main
I’ve told you about the problem facing our nation regarding the
Points:
shortage of organ donors, three causes contributing to this national
shortage, and three specific solutions for addressing this problem –
both in our nation and community.
Clincher:
What if the person waiting on the list needing an organ transplant
was someone you loved? Imagine if you had a brother or sister who
had unexpectedly died and you were able to meet the person who
received their heart, for example. Think of the satisfaction and
possible comfort knowing that your brother or sister provided life
for somebody else. I’m going to leave you with a short message from
Michael Jordan who is a sponsor for the Iowa LifeGift Coalition on
Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness and appears in their 1996
brochure. “Please make the decision to become an organ and tissue
donor. Remember: Share your life. Share your decision.”
Reference List
Include a complete Reference List (i.e., Bibliography) for at least five (5) research sources including at least 1
source from a Rutgers University Libraries periodical database that was referenced in the Main Points (subpoints). All sources are to meet the 6 criteria: expertise, objectivity, accuracy, currency, origin, and relevancy.
The Reference List is to follow APA format style guidelines (6th edition). Refer to the chapter on Researching
Your Speech, and also the APA Resources at the end of this document.
Full Citation I:
Gundersen Lutheran Hospital:”Life…Pass it on.” Undated brochure.
Full Citation II:
Klein, A. S., Messersmith, E. E., Ratner, L. E., Kochik, R., Baliga, P. K., & Ojo, A. O.
(2010). Organ donation and utilization in the United States, 1999-2008.
American Journal of Transplantation, 973-986. Retrieved from JSTOR.
Full Citation III:
LifeSource: Questions and answers. April 1998. Accessed January 12, 2014 from
www.life-source.org/public.html
Full Citation IV:
Medcure: Fears or Why People Don’t Donate Their Body to Science. January
2014. Accessed January 17, 2014 from http://medcure.org/fears-or-whypeople-dont-donate-their-body-to-science/
Full Citation V:
Siminoff, L. A., Gordon, N., Hewlett, J., & Arnold, R. M. (2001). Factors influencing
families’ consent for donation of solid organs for transplantation. JAMA, 286, 7177. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier.
Full Citation VI:
South Dakota Lions Eye Bank: “No greater gift…Than yourself to others.”
Undated brochure.
*Please note: This sample outline was originally developed by the Cunningham Memorial Library at
Indiana State University:
https://www.cmich.edu/office_provost/AcademicAffairs/CBTC/Documents/SAMPLEOUTLINES.pdf
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
6
Persuasive Speech Outline (Template)
COM380 Public Speaking
Student’s Name:
Course #/Section:
Note: Complete all parts of the Persuasive Speech Outline. Review relevant readings and lectures on:
Audience Analysis, Researching Your Speech, Supporting Materials for Your Speech, Organizing Your
Speech, Outlining Your Speech, Persuasive Speaking, & Methods of Persuasion.
Planning for the Persuasive Speech with Analysis
Speech Topic:
Rhetorical Purpose:
To persuade my audience to . . .
Audience Analysis:
(Refer to chapters on
Audience Analysis &
Persuasive Speaking)
Summarize Audience demographics, prior exposure/knowledge,
common ground/interest, disposition/attitude, and situational
characteristics. Incorporate results of Audience Analysis Survey about
classmates from the Audience Analysis Activity/Discussion in Unit 3.
Also, incorporate techniques on “Tailoring your Persuasive Message to
Your Audience” from the readings on Persuasive Speaking.
Persuasive claims:
(refer to chapter on
Persuasive Speaking)
Organizational
Pattern:
(refer to chapters on
Organizing Your Speech
& Persuasive Speaking)
Message/
Methods of
Persuasion:
(refer to chapter on
Methods of Persuasion)
Organizing fact claims, value claims, or policy claims? Please explain.
Types of Supporting
Materials:
(refer to chapter on
Supporting Materials)
Types of Research
Sources:
(review “Background
Information” for the
Speech Research
Activity)
What types of supporting materials do you plan to include? (e.g.,
examples, definitions, testimony, statistics, narratives, analogies)
Causal, comparison, categorical, criteria-application, motivated
sequence, problem-cause-solution pattern, or comparative advantage?
Please explain.
How do you plan to use evidence and reasoning (logos), and avoid
logical fallacies? Do you plan to use emotional appeals? (pathos) or
credibility (ethos)? (Note: be aware that presentation aids – e.g.,
PowerPoint – are required for this speech.)
What types of research sources (e.g., primary, secondary, and/or
tertiary) do you plan to use to support the thesis statement and main
points? Please explain. Note: 5 credible and relevant sources are
required including at least 1 scholarly source from a Rutgers University
Libraries periodical database.
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
1
Persuasive Speech “Formal Outline”
Introduction
I.
Write in complete sentences. Refer to chapter on Outlining Your Speech.
Attention Getter:
II.
Thesis Statement:
III. Connection with
Audience:
IV.
Speaker’s Credibility:
V.
Preview of Main
Points:
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
2
Persuasive Speech “Formal Outline” (contd.)
Body
Write in complete sentences. Important: Include evidence and reasoning and other persuasive appeals in sub-points
(refer to source in each sub-point by paraphrasing, quoting, or summarizing with a citation following APA format – 6th
edition), and insert transitions between main points. Refer to chapters on Researching Your Speech, Outlining Your
Speech, and Persuasive Speaking, & Methods of Persuasion.
I.
Main Point One:
Sub-point A:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point B:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point C:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Transition:
II.

Main Point Two:
Sub-point A:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point B:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point C:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Transition:
III. Main Point Three:
Sub-point A:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point B:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Sub-point C:
(w/source
citation, if
applicable)
Transition:
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
3
Persuasive Speech “Formal Outline”
Conclusion
I.
Write in complete sentences. Refer to chapter on Outlining Your Speech.
Summary of Main
Points:
II.
Clincher:
Reference List
Include a complete Reference List (i.e., Bibliography) for five (5) research sources including at least 1
scholarly source from a Rutgers University Libraries periodical database that was referenced in the Main
Points (sub-points). All sources are to meet the 6 criteria: expertise, objectivity, accuracy, currency, origin,
and relevancy. The Reference List is to follow APA format style guidelines (6th edition). Refer to the chapter
on Researching Your Speech, and also the APA Resources at the end of this document.
Full Citation I:
Full Citation II:
Full Citation III:
Full Citation IV:
Full Citation V:
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
4
APA Resources
Research sources that will be referenced in your speeches (and cited in the “Speech Outline” and
the Reference List) are to follow APA style format (6th edition). The following resources can assist
you in citing your sources and creating the Reference List (bibliography) following APA guidelines:
•
Rutgers University Libraries – LibGuide: Writing and Citation Formatting Electronic
Reference Sources – See: http://libguides.rutgers.edu/writing
•
The OWL at Purdue Online Writing Lab: Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing (for subpoints) – See: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/owlprint/563/ and
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/
•
The OWL at Purdue Online Writing Lab: In-Text Citations (for sub-points) – See:
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02/ and
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/
•
The OWL at Purdue Online Writing Lab: APA Formatting and Style Guide – Reference List –
See: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/05/
•
The OWL at Purdue Online Writing Lab: APA Formatting and Style Guide – See:
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
•
Hackerhandbooks.com: Research and Documentation Online: APA List of References – See:
http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch09_s1-0002.html
•
Trinity University: Citing Sources (select APA Style and content type from drop-down
menu) – See: http://lib.trinity.edu/lib2/cite.php
•
Cornell University Library: APA Citation Style – See:
http://www.library.cornell.edu/newhelp/res_strategy/citing/apa.html
•
University of Maryland University Libraries: Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Sources –
See: http://www.lib.umd.edu/ues/guides/primary-sources#tertiary
•
Ref Works is Web-based citation management software that can help you to create your
own research database and generate bibliographies or works cited lists in a specified style
such as APA. All of the sources listed under the Finding Journals tab will allow you to export
references. See: http://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/refworks/refworks.shtml
Persuasive Speech Outline Template designed by Denise Kreiger and Ralph Gigliotti, SC&I, 12/13
5

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