+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

Description

An explanation of some point in the performance management course.

Chapter 9
Performance Management
Leadership
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-1
Overview
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Coaching
Coaching Styles
Coaching Process
Coaching, Development, and
Performance Review Meetings
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-2
Coaching: Definition
â—¼
Collaborative ongoing process in
which the manager interacts
with his or her direct reports
and takes an active role and
interest in their performance
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-3
Coaching: Definition
â—¼
Involves:
•Directing employee behavior
•Motivating employee behavior
•Rewarding employee behavior
•Concerned with long-term
performance
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-4
Successful Coaching
Actionable Functions, and Specific
Behaviors of Coaching
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-5
Coaching Styles
Task and
fact oriented
People
oriented
More
assertive
Less
assertive
Driver
Analyzer
Persuader
Amiable
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-6
Adaptive Coaches Use All Styles
According to Employee Needs
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Sometimes providing direction
Sometimes persuading
Sometimes showing empathy
Sometimes paying close attention
to rules and established procedures
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-7
Coaching Process
9-8
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
Coaching Culture
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Establishing a Coaching Culture
What are the benefits for performance
management of developing a coaching
culture?
What is the difference between
criticizing employee performance and
coaching?
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-9
Company Spotlight
â—¼
â—¼
Becton, Dickinson, and Company values a
coaching culture as an integral part of a
performance management by managers
Three key steps:
• Corporate leaders model coaching as a way to
improve performance
• Leaders at all levels are coached, and
expected to coach the development of others
• Coaching and development is one of the key
responsibilities and deliverables for all leaders
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-10
Coaching Process:
Steps Covered in Chapter 8
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Set developmental goals
Identify developmental activities
and needed resources to
implement developmental goals
Implement developmental
activities
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-11
Coaching Process:
Overview of Remaining Steps
â—¼
â—¼
Observe and document
developmental behavior and
results
Give feedback
• Praise
• Negative feedback
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-12
Observe and Document Developmental
Behavior and Results
Constraints:
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Time
Situation
Activity
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-13
Company Spotlight
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Hallmark is using training to help managers
become performance management leaders
Used self-assessment, small group roleplaying, and viewing video clips
Focused on gaining the trust of employees
as well as their involvement and ownership
in business outcomes
Follow-up resources were made available
for managers to continue to improve their
leadership competency
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-14
Reasons to Document Performance
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Minimize cognitive load
Create trust
Plan for the future
Provide legal protection
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-15
Best-Practices for Documentation
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-16
Giving Feedback
â—¼
Main purposes:
• Help build confidence
• Develop competence
• Enhances engagement
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-17
To Be Effective, Feedback Should Be…
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-18
Guidelines for Giving Praise
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Be sincere—only give praise when it
is deserved
Give praise about specific behaviors
or results
Take your time
Be comfortable with act of praising
Emphasize the positive
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-19
Giving Constructive Feedback
Managers often avoid giving negative
feedback because they:
â—¼ Anticipate negative reactions and
consequences
â—¼ Have had negative experiences in the
past
◼ Dislike of playing “God”
â—¼ Like having irrefutable and conclusive
evidence
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-20
Constructive Feedback Is Most
Useful When It…
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Identifies warning signs and
performance problem is still
manageable
Clarifies unwanted behaviors and
consequences
Focuses on behaviors that can be
changed
Comes from a credible source
Is supported by hard data
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-21
Generational Differences
Regarding Feedback
â—¼
â—¼
Younger individuals think of time as openended
• Have work goals that are future-oriented:
knowledge acquisition, career planning,
and the development of ability and skills
Older individuals think of time as limited
• Have work goals that are present-oriented:
regulating their emotions to be positive
and the pursuit of positive social
relationships at work
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-22
Generational Differences
Regarding Feedback
â—¼
â—¼
Giving Feedback to Different Generations
Think of feedback you have received or
given. How might that message be
adapted for different generations?
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-23
Individual Differences
Regarding Feedback
â—¼
Feedback-Seeking Behavior
• Extent to which they proactively ask peers,
supervisors, and others for feedback, and
also, in the extent to which they
proactively monitor their own performance
themselves
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-24
Disciplinary Process and
Termination
â—¼
Formal disciplinary process
involves
• Verbal warning
• Written warning
… which may lead to termination
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-25
Disciplinary Process and
Termination (continued)
â—¼
Optional step prior to formal disciplinary
process:
• Decision-making leave
A decision-making leave is a “day of
contemplation” that is paid and allows the
employee to stay home and decide whether
working in this organization is what he or
she really wants to do.
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-26
Disciplinary Process and
Termination: Pitfall #1
â—¼
â—¼
Acceptance of poor performance
Suggestion: Do not ignore the
problem, address it immediately
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-27
Disciplinary Process and
Termination: Pitfall #2
â—¼
â—¼
Failure to get the message through
Suggestion: Be specific about the
performance problem and the
consequences of not addressing it
effectively
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-28
Disciplinary Process and
Termination: Pitfall #3
â—¼
â—¼
Performance standards are
“unrealistic” or “unfair”
Suggestion: Remind employees of the
fairness of the performance standard and
provide documentation of the poor
performance
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-29
Disciplinary Process and
Termination: Pitfall #4
â—¼
â—¼
Negative affective reactions
Suggestion: Do not let emotional
reactions derail you from your missions
of describing the nature of the problem,
what needs to be done, and the
consequences of not doing so
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-30
Disciplinary Process and
Termination: Pitfall #5
â—¼
â—¼
Failure to consult Human
Resources
Suggestion: Consult with Human
Resources regarding legal requirement
prior to termination
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-31
Disciplinary Process and
Termination: Meeting
â—¼
Suggestions for termination meeting:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Be respectful
Get right to the point
Let the employee grieve
Wish the employee well
Send the employee to HR
Have the employee leave immediately
Have the termination meeting at the end of
the day
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-32
Supervisory Roles in Managing
Performance
â—¼
Judge
• Evaluate performance
• Allocate rewards
â—¼
Coach
• Help employee solve performance
problems
• Identify performance weaknesses
• Design developmental plans
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-33
Performance Review Formal
Meetings
Possible types of formal meetings:
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
System Inauguration
Self-Appraisal
Classical Performance Review
Merit/Salary Review
Developmental Plan
Objective Setting
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-34
Steps to Take Before Meeting
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Give at least two weeks notice
Block sufficient time
Arrange to meet in a private
location without interruptions
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-35
Merged Performance Review
Meeting Components
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Explanation of meeting purpose
Employee self-appraisal
Supervisor and employee share rating and
rationale
Developmental discussion
Employee summary
Rewards discussion
Schedule follow-up meeting
Approval and appeals process discussion
Final recap
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-36
Possible Defensive Behaviors of
Employees
â—¼
â—¼
Fight response
• Blaming others
• Staring at supervisor
• Raising voice
• Other aggressive responses
Flight response
• Looking/turning away
• Speaking softly
• Continually changing the subject
• Quickly agreeing without basis
• Other passive responses
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-37
Prevent/Reduce Defensive
Behaviors
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Establish and maintain rapport
Be empathetic
Be open-minded
Observe verbal and nonverbal cues
Minimize threats
Encourage participation
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-38
When Defensiveness Is
Unavoidable
â—¼
â—¼
Recognize it
Allow its expression
• Accept employee’s feelings
• Ask for additional information and clarification
(if appropriate)
â—¼
If situation becomes intolerable:
• Reschedule the meeting for a later time
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-39
Overcoming Defensiveness
â—¼
â—¼
â—¼
Coaching “Difficult” Employees
Why might employees become defensive
during performance review meetings?
What are pitfalls to avoid when dealing
with defensive employees?
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-40
Quick Review
Coaching
â—¼ Coaching Styles
â—¼ Coaching Process
â—¼ Coaching, Development,
and Performance Review
Meetings
â—¼
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
9-41
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in
any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior
written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United
States of America.
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
Copyright © 2019 Chicago Business Press
1-42
Coaching is an important process in organizations. As explored in Chapter 9
of the textbook, there are various competencies associated with effective
coaching. However, many individuals do not have the competencies to be an
effective coach. In fact, researchers continue to debate about the necessary
competencies needed for effective coaching.
Within your response this week, focus on the four guiding principles of
successful coaching. Then, explain, in your own words, what techniques you
would utilize to create a strong coaching relationship:
•
•
•
•
How would you ensure the development of a good coaching relationship between yourself and your employee?
How would you reinforce the employee’s role in his/her growth and advancement?
How would you recognize the uniqueness of the employee?
How would you describe your role as a facilitator during coaching?
In addition to the questions above, what competencies do you believe you
need to further develop to be a better coach? Why?
Embed course material concepts, principles, and theories, which require
supporting citations, along with two scholarly, peer-reviewed references in
supporting your answer. Keep in mind that these scholarly references can be
found in the Saudi Digital Library by conducting an advanced search specific
to scholarly references.
Be sure to support your statements with logic and argument, citing all sources
referenced. Post your initial response early and check back often to continue
the discussion. Be sure to respond to your peers’ posts as well.
Answer all questions posted by students and your professor. These post
replies need to be substantial and constructive in nature. They should add to
the content of the post and evaluate/analyze that post answer. Normal course
dialogue doesn’t fulfill these two peer replies but is expected throughout the
course. Answering all course questions is also required.
References should include Chicago Business Press 2019

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

  
error: Content is protected !!