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Imagine you are head of the HR department and you have been asked to review five applicants for the sales clerk position at your company. During the interview process, you learn the following about each applicant:

THE APPLICANTS

Alice

Alice has 10 years of experience in sales but can be distracted easily. She will not work on commission and cannot work weekends. She can be a little obstinate but has an excellent job history. She also requires ADA accommodations due to an injury sustained during military service.

Mary

Mary has just one year’s experience, but she is very congenial and loves working with people. Her work schedule is very flexible but she can become a little stressed at times and periodically needs to leave quietly and regroup for a short time. Mary also considers herself a human rights advocate with an emphasis on race relations, and is known to voice her opinions related to racial injustice to others.

James

James has seven years’ experience, a master’s degree in business, and aspirations of owning a company in the near future. James is a devout Christian. He is known to make biblical references often, encourages others to attend his church, and has requested 80 hours in advance to attend religious conferences within the next six months.

Sam

Sam has six years’ experience and is willing to work all shifts. Sam is transgender, prefers gender-neutral pronouns (they/them), and is looking for a new job due to bullying at a previous workplace.

Justin

Justin has five years’ experience, is hardworking, flexible, and has a great job history. Justin is also someone you met in college, dated briefly, and have not seen in a few years.

CANDIDATE SELECTION

Decide which candidate would be the right fit for the sales clerk position.

Describe the thought process that led to your decision and your reasons for not selecting one or more of the other candidates.

Justify your choice, including all of the considerations or factors that influenced your selection.

After reading both classmates’ posts, reply to those from whom you learned something new or posts to which you have something constructive to add. For example:

Discuss what you learned.

Ask probing questions or seek clarification.

Explain why you agree or disagree with your classmate’s main points, assertions, assumptions, or conclusions.

Suggest research strategies or specific resources on the topic.

You must complete one original post and at least one reply to both classmate. Join the discussion early and post often.

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FORUM: WEEK 3 DISCUSSION

THREAD: WEEK 3 DISCUSSION

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Imagine you are head of the HR department and you have been asked to review five applicants for the sales clerk position at your company. During the interview process, you learn the following about each applicant:

THE APPLICANTS

Alice

Alice has 10 years of experience in sales but can be distracted easily. She will not work on commission and cannot work weekends. She can be a little obstinate but has an excellent job history. She also requires ADA accommodations due to an injury sustained during military service.

Mary

Mary has just one year’s experience, but she is very congenial and loves working with people. Her work schedule is very flexible but she can become a little stressed at times and periodically needs to leave quietly and regroup for a short time. Mary also considers herself a human rights advocate with an emphasis on race relations, and is known to voice her opinions related to racial injustice to others.

James

James has seven years’ experience, a master’s degree in business, and aspirations of owning a company in the near future. James is a devout Christian. He is known to make biblical references often, encourages others to attend his church, and has requested 80 hours in advance to attend religious conferences within the next six months.

Sam

Sam has six years’ experience and is willing to work all shifts. Sam is transgender, prefers gender-neutral pronouns (they/them), and is looking for a new job due to bullying at a previous workplace.

Justin

Justin has five years’ experience, is hardworking, flexible, and has a great job history. Justin is also someone you met in college, dated briefly, and have not seen in a few years.

CANDIDATE SELECTION

Decide which candidate would be the right fit for the sales clerk position.

Describe the thought process that led to your decision and your reasons for not selecting one or more of the other candidates.

Justify your choice, including all of the considerations or factors that influenced your selection.

After reading a few of your classmates’ posts, reply to those from whom you learned something new or posts to which you have something constructive to add. For example:

Discuss what you learned.

Ask probing questions or seek clarification.

Explain why you agree or disagree with your classmate’s main points, assertions, assumptions, or conclusions.

Suggest research strategies or specific resources on the topic.

You must complete one original post and at least one reply to a classmate. Join the discussion early and post often

Linnie Harrington

Hello Everyone,

We were asked to review the following candidates for possible employment and explain why or why not they were chosen. Choosing your employees carefully is very important. Who you add to your team effects not only team culture but organizational culture as well. Employee selection is the process of testing and gathering information to decide whom to hire. Effective selection provides many benefits. Selecting the right employees can improve the effectiveness of other human resource practices and prevent numerous problems. For instance, hiring highly motivated employees who fit with the organizational culture can reduce disciplinary problems and diminish costs related to replacing employees who quit. HR has to find the appropriate combination of Job Fit and Organizational Fit needs to manifest an effective hiring strategy. Stewart, G., & Brown, K. 2019. Let’s take a look at our potential candidates.

The Applicants:

Alice

Alice has 10 years of experience in sales but can be distracted easily. She will not work on commission and cannot work weekends. She can be a little obstinate but has an excellent job history. She also requires ADA accommodations due to an injury sustained during military service. I would not choose Alice due to her not having schedule flexibility. Most retail positions require you to work your share of rotating weekends and Holidays. They do not tend to be typical Monday through Friday banker’s hours positions. As a hiring manager, I am always looking for people with open availability, and if the sales-clerk position was one that included a percentage of commission-based sales, she would not be the proper candidate either. I would not have a problem with providing her the necessary ADA accommodations if she met the other position criteria.

Mary

Mary has just one year’s experience, but she is very congenial and loves working with people. Her work schedule is very flexible, but she can become a little stressed at times and periodically needs to leave quietly and regroup for a short time. Mary also considers herself a human rights advocate with an emphasis on race relations and is known to voice her opinions related to racial injustice to others. Mary would be a candidate that I would choose to hire. Being that she does come with experience, is congenial and people person, and those are both qualities that are very important in sales I would be willing to accommodate her need for mental health breaks. The ADA provides specific protection to individuals currently suffering from a disability. The law also protects people in two other categories: those who have a record of having a disability in the past and those who are regarded as having a disability, even if they do not. Stewart, G., & Brown, K. 2019. I would ask her if she would be willing to go more in depth and talk with me regarding her stressors, and triggers, and develop a plan to assist her and help her be successful in her role so that it is not an undue hardship for the company and other employees. Tolerance and mental health awareness trainings should have already been completed within the organization, if not then a strategy can be put into place to ensure that those trainings become a part of the program.

James

James has seven years’ experience, a master’s degree in business, and aspirations of owning a company in the near future. James is a devout Christian. He is known to make biblical references often, encourages others to attend his church, and has requested 80 hours in advance to attend religious conferences within the next six months. I love the fact that James has so much experience as well as a master’s degree in business, which makes him a bit over-qualified in the eyes of some people, his religious preferences are his own and I would respect them, however people tend to view religion in many different ways and those references really do not have a place on the sales floor as they can be offensive to some people. If he was chosen, that is a conversation that must be had. However, the fact that he needs to 2-weeks off for conferences during his first 6-months of employment is a bit much from a business and operarational standpoint. He would be in probationary training for 90- days and still really becoming acclimated to his position. Religious accommodations can be made for regular occurrences such as his Sabbath day, but His absence on the sales floor for those extended periods could present an undue hardship on the company and other employees. That much time off is generally only granted after a full year of service for tenured employees. Examples of burdens on business that are more than minimal (or an “undue hardship”) include: violating a seniority system; causing a lack of necessary staffing. EEOC, 2022. Also, being that his main goal is to open his own business, I have to wonder about his prospective longevity in the position. The cost of hiring and onboarding is one of the largest expenses that companies have due to turnover rates. I would not offer James the position.

Sam

Sam has six years’ experience and is willing to work all shifts. Sam is transgender, prefers gender-neutral pronouns (they/them), and is looking for a new job due to bullying at a previous workplace. As a supervisor, due to Sam’s experience and open availability, I would choose to hire to hire Sam. I would fully support Sam’s usage gender-neutral pronouns as it is their right to be addressed as they choose to be. Diversity and Inclusion is a large part of any team that I supervise, and it should be within any company. Sensitivity training can also be done to help better prepare existing staff for Sam’s addition to the team if it has not already been completed. To better assist customers, Sam’s pronouns can be added under his name on his nametag. We may even find that other employees would appreciate this inclusionary action on theirs as well.

Justin

Justin has five years’ experience, is hardworking, flexible, and has a great job history. Justin is also someone you met in college, dated briefly, and have not seen in a few years. While Justin is a great candidate, I do not feel as if it would be proper to hire him under my supervision due to our past history with one another. That type of situation could cause issues in the future such as other employees feeling that I am giving Justin preferential treatment, or Justin feeling as if I am treating him unjustly due to our past if he ever needs to be reprimanded and false sexual harassment or discrimination allegations. What I would do is pass his resume and my interview notes on to another hiring department with a different supervisor as I feel that he may be a good addition to the organization, just not to my personal team.

Thank you for reading,

Linnie Harrington

Stewart, G. L., & Brown, K. G. (2019). Human Resource Management (4th Edition). Wiley Global Education US.

https://strayer.vitalsource.com/books/978111949217…

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. What You Should Know: Workplace Religious Accommodation, 2022. Retrieved on July 10, 2022. From,

https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/guidance/what-you-should…

Shannon Garrett

Week 3 Discussion

Hello Classmates,

Here is my review of each candidate and my decision on hiring:

Alice – I did not choose Alice because while she is experienced, she is not flexible (cannot work weekends, cannot work on commission). For a sales position, the pay is usually commission-based.

James – I decided to hire James because he has seven years of experience with a master’s degree. His religion is protected by Title VII of the Civil rights of 1964, so his faith cannot be factored into hiring decisions. If his time-off request does not create hardship, we must accommodate the time-off request. I would review the company PTO policy and discuss with management regarding his requested accommodation. He might be an HR concern if his biblical references and encouraging people to go to church make them feel uncomfortable. However, he still cannot be treated differently because that might be a “concern.”

Sam – I would hire Sam because they are the most flexible and has six years of experience. His gender-neutral pronouns are not a factor. His pronouns should be communicated to the team upfront to ensure they honor him.

Justin – I would recommend Justin to be hired because they are experienced, hardworking, and flexible. But I would disclose that I know Justin personally to ensure that I am upfront about any biases in my decision. I would give his information to another hiring manager to make the final decision.

Mary – Mary has the least experience, but I would hire her because she is a people person with a good personality that would make her a good fit for the position. Her views on racial injustices were not factored into my decision.

My immediate decisions were based on experience, but much more goes into making a hiring decision. Which candidate is an excellent addition to the team? Are we looking for someone who will be with the company long-term? If so James may not be a good fit since he is looking to have his own company one day. In my judgment, I would consider diversity. I want to make sure the team is diverse. For example, If we have already hired ten other men, it may be necessary to hire a woman or vice versa.

Shannon Garrett

  
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