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HELLO THE STORY IS ABOUT THE dolls house and i want an answer with optional 1 from the story and make sure please the questions are about 6-7 sentences long. The second one I would like a reply to answer from classmate and the question is on top of the answer.

Answer to this question :

OPTIONAL 1: Examine the stage directions at the beginning of the play (before the dialogue begins). This is the description of the set, or stage design—it describes how the stage look at the beginning of the play, what kinds of objects should be seen by the audience, etc., and also Nora’s entrance, which begins the play. Consider what Ibsen includes and why. What do the specifics he mentions convey to us (the audience) about the the house, the characters, their circumstances, and what atmosphere or mood does the set and Nora’s entrance create (and how)?

A REPLY TO THIS ANSWER:

QUESTION

Look at interactions between Nora and Torvald in the earlier parts of the play, paying attention to how Nora is interacting with Torvald. Pay particular attention to points at which she is asking for something or wants something from Torvald, or where she wants to draw his attention away from something else. What approach does she use to accomplish what she wants?

ANSWER

W

henever Nora wants to change the topic with Torvald she starts to act like a clueless doll (he loves that) and compliments him or she mentions some sort of fun event that they are planning on attending. When Nora lies to Torvald and says that Krogsdad was not in the house talking to her and he gets upset, she tells him that she can’t wait for the Stenborgs’ costume party and they start talking about her “surprise”. Immediately after this, she wants to know what Krogsdad did that is so bad, so she compliments Torvald’s taste and asks him to pick her costume for the party, now that he feels flattered she asks him about what Krogsdad did and why he must be punished. Also at the start of act 2, when Nora wants to ask Torvald to not fire Krogsdad she starts to compliment the costume that he picked for her, and then she starts to ask him by calling herself his “little squirrel”, “lark”, and “elf maid”, and that she will dance and sing for him. These are pet names that he gave her earlier in the play.

The four questions/topics are posted below and on the discussion forum. Choose one of the four
to respond to. On the forum, click on my post with the corresponding number (and first few
words—you’ll see the full question in my post). Click on “reply” in my post and write your post
in the message box that opens. Once a question has three replies (you can see how many there
are before you click to open my post) you need to choose one that has fewer than three, until they
all have at least four; if that happens before you make your first choice, respond to the one that
has the fewest responses at that point.
Next, you’ll write a response or addition to one of the other discussions. If you make your first
post early, before others have posted, wait a while until there are at least a couple of posts for
each of the questions (so you have some other posts to read and respond to, and so the initial
numbers are indicating actual responses, not just those posting for access). As you did on the
previous forum, you need to post a “gaining access” post to each of the three questions you
didn’t respond to, and, after waiting for the editing time to pass, read what your classmates have
posted and choose one of the other three discussions to join by writing a post that responds to
and/or adds to what has been written so far. Try to keep the number of responses to each
question fairly balanced; by this point you’ll need to look at the actual posts to see which are
responses and which are only “gaining access,” and choose one that has fewer actual posts
(unless they are all fairly equal).
When you have finished these two posts, you should have access to the second discussion forum.
It has only one topic which everyone should respond to. Don’t forget to go back to read through
the other responses once everyone has posted.
OPTIONAL 1
Examine the stage directions at the beginning of the play (before the dialogue begins). This is the
description of the set, or stage design—it describes how the stage look at the beginning of the
play, what kinds of objects should be seen by the audience, etc., and also Nora’s entrance, which
begins the play. Consider what Ibsen includes and why. What do the specifics he mentions
convey to us (the audience) about the the house, the characters, their circumstances, and what
atmosphere or mood does the set and Nora’s entrance create (and how)?
OPTIONAL 2
Make a list of some of the words or terms (nicknames) Torvald uses for Nora when he speaks
with her). Nicknames used in relationships are often called “terms of endearment” or “pet
names” (“pet” comes from a Scottish term that meant “favorite” or “specially cherished”). What
impression do you get, both from the nicknames and from the dialogue between them? How does
Torvald see Nora and their relationship? What do you think about the nicknames and the way he
speaks to and interacts with Nora? What does this suggest about how he sees their relationship
(or their roles in the relationship)?
OPTIONAL 3
Look at interactions between Nora and Torvald in the earlier parts of the play, paying attention to
how Nora is interacting with Torvald. Pay particular attention to points at which she is asking for
something or wants something from Torvald, or where she wants to draw his attention away
from something else. What approach does she use to accomplish what she wants?
OPTIONAL 4
At the end of the play, Nora tells Torvald that she doesn’t love him. Do you think this is true? Do
you think she ever loved him? Do you think that he loved her? Provide specifics from the play
that give form the basis for your answers in your explanation..
REQUIRED (RESPOND TO THIS AFTER YOU HAVE POSTED YOUR FIRST TWO
POSTS):
Audiences of Ibsen’s time often saw Nora’s decision to leave her family and her marriage as
selfish. Do you think she is being selfish? Find the specific reasons Nora states for why she feels
she must leave, and use these to explain why you do or do not see her decision as selfish.
Ibsen once said, in reference to The Doll’s House:
…I must disclaim the honor of having consciously worked for the women’s rights
movement…True enough, it is desirable to solve the woman problem, along with all the
others; but that has not been the whole purpose. My task has been the description of
humanity.” (Ibsen, Letters).
Some writers and scholars, in reviews or analysis of The Doll’s House (especially during Ibsen’s
time, but others since then as well), don’t want to see Ibsen’s play as an argument for women’s
rights (because it suggests that societal views of women and marriage of the time—the status
quo—was wrong). One even went so far as to suggest that, after having spent hours in close
examination of the play, that Ibsen was actually writing a comedy; the audience was supposed to
realize the absurdity of the idea of Nora going out on her own and laugh at her childish slamming
of the door, knowing she would be back home almost immediately, once she realized what she
was giving up. But consider these two quotes (one of which you’ve already read in the materials
I posted) from Ibsen and whether they suggest the emphasis in his quotation might be on it not
having “been the whole purpose” of the play—that it extended to anyone whose rights were
limited.
TO SHARE AS COMMENTS—to the question about why she leaves–
These women of the modern age, mistreated as daughters, as sisters, as wives, not educated
in accordance with their talents, debarred from following their real mission, deprived of
their inheritance, embittered in mind—these are the ones who supply the mothers for the
next generation.What will result from this?
NOT USED
The literary definition of a villain is often just the character who causes difficulty for the hero.
Using this definition, Krogstad would definitely be a “villain.” However, phrases used to define
a villain are “a person who is wicked or evil,” “one who is guilty of or likely to commit great
crimes,” “a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or crime,”
“an extremely depraved person, or one capable or guilty of great crimes.” Using these definitions
and making references to specifics from the play, support your view.
You can also look more broadly at their dialogue and interaction to examine their relationship—
how they view each other, how they respond to each other, and what these things tell us about
their relationship (roles and interactions in their marriage). Be sure to reference specifics and
point out some words or phrases as examples as you discuss.
NOT FINISHED/NOT USED
While writing The Doll’s House, Ibsen wrote “A woman cannot be herself
in modern society, which is exclusively a masculine society, with laws written by men,
and with accusers and judges who judge feminine conduct from the masculine standpoint.”
A Doll’s House Words on Plays (2004) – Nanopdf
https://nanopdf.com › download › a-dolls-house-…
PDF
Feb 8, 2004 — Ibsen and A Doll’s House: Observations by and about the Playwright and His Play.
Compiled by Carolyn Joy Lenske.
“Notes for A Modern Tragedy,” Rome, October 19, 1878
There are two kinds of moral laws, two kinds of conscience, one for men and one, quite
different, for women. They don’t understand each other; but in practical life, woman is
judged by masculine law, as though she weren’t a woman but a man.
The wife in the play ends by having no idea what is right and what is wrong; natural feelings
on the one hand and belief in authority on the other have altogether bewildered her.
A woman cannot be herself in modern society. It is an exclusively male society, with laws
made by men and with a judicial system that judges feminine conduct from a masculine
point of view.
She has committed forgery, and is proud of it; for she has done it out of love for her
husband, to save his life. But this husband of hers takes his standpoint, conventionally
honorable, on the side of the law, and sees the situation with male eyes.
Moral conflict.Weighed down and confused by her trust in authority, she loses faith in
her own morality, and in her fitness to bring up her children. Bitterness. A mother in modern
society, like certain insects, retires and dies once she has done her duty by propagating
the race. Love of life, of home, of husband and children and family. Now and then, as
women do, she shrugs off her thoughts. Suddenly anguish and fear return. Everything
must be borne alone. The catastrophe approaches, mercilessly, inevitably. Despair, conflict,
and defeat.
Quoted in “A Doll’s House Words on Plays”
A whole bunch of quotes from A Doll’s House: Words on Plays (link above—pdf in 2208 Master
The moment she leaves her home is the moment her life is to begin. . . . In this play there
is a big, grown-up child, Nora, who has to go out into life to discover herself.
With the view of her marriage which Nora has formed this night it would be immoral
of her to continue living together with Helmer; This she cannot do and therefore she
leaves.
Ibsen writing about Nora ( January 1880), quoted in
The Cambridge Companion to Ibsen, edited by James McFarlane
A year after A Doll’s House appeared, a Scandinavian woman came to Rome, where the
Ibsens were living. She had left her husband and small daughter to run away with her
lover. The Norwegian exile community considered this unnatural and asked Ibsen what he
thought. “It is not unnatural, only it is unusual,” was Ibsen’s opinion. The woman made it
a point to speak to Ibsen, but to her surprise he treated her offhandedly. “Well, I did the
same thing your Nora did,” she said, offended. Ibsen replied quietly: “My Nora went
alone.”
Joan Templeton, Ibsen’s Women
critique of A DOLL’S HOUSE
I ask you directly: is there one mother among thousands of mothers, one wife among
thousands of wives, who could behave as Nora behaves, who would desert husband,
children, and home merely in order to become “a human being”? I answer with conviction:
no and again no!
Critic and theater manager m. w. Brun (December 21, 1879)
[I have] never sat out a play more dreary or illogical as a whole, or in its details more
feeble or commonplace. It is as though someone had dramatized the cooking of a Sunday
dinner.
Theater review in the Sporting and Dramatic News, London (1889)
37
Just as Nora appears in the final scene, free and unfettered by any bond, divine or human,
without commitment or obligation to the man whom she has given her promise or to the
children she has brought into this world—likewise we will find the wife in the modern
marriage, from beginning to end. . . . The emancipated woman has taken her place at the
door, always ready to depart, with her suitcase in her hand. The suitcase—and not, as
before, the ring of fidelity—will be the symbol of her role in marriage.
Sermon cautioning parishioners about the dangers of the “emancipated woman,”
by Rev. m. j. Faerden (1884)
She to whom love is everything, above the letter of the law, public opinion, even religion,
of which she knows as little as most things learned by rote, discovers that his love is a convenience,
not a commitment of the self. Thus her love for him is destroyed. . . .
Can we even today maintain that there no longer exist among us, and in considerable
numbers, our Noras and husbands very much like hers? And are there none left who do
not somehow resent the play?
Harold Clurman, Ibsen (1977)
Critics still sometimes write about A Doll’s House as though it were a play about women’s
rights, despite Ibsen’s repeated protests to the contrary. Its theme, [Ibsen] stressed, is the
need of every human being, whether man or woman, to find out who he or she is and to
strive to become that person. . . . A Doll’s House is no more about women’s rights than
Shakespeare’s Richard II is about the divine right of kings, or Ghosts is about syphilis, or An
Enemy of the People about public hygiene. Its theme is the need of every individual to find
out the kind of person he or she really is and to strive to become that person.
Michael Meyer, Ibsen: A Biography
Right up to the final showdown Nora has clung to the notion of “the miraculous,” to the
dream that Helmer will take upon himself the complete and full responsibility for her
actions and thereby courageously defy the threat of society’s condemnation of her. Her illusory
picture of the husband is valid only for some romantic-patriarchal dream world. The
real Helmer is in his mental make-up much less liberated than Nora herself; he reveals
himself as being a pitiable and egotistic slave of the male society of which he is so conspicuous
a defender. It is not the human being in him which speaks to Nora at their final
confrontation; it is society, its institutions and authorities, which speak through him.
Bjørn Hemmer, Ibsen and the Realistic Problem Drama (1994)
38

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